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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Washington, D.C., Pitches New Bridge Park As A 'Model For Social Equity'

A rendering for the planned 11th Street Bridge Park in Washington, D.C.
OMA and OLIN

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 10:39 am

Washington, D.C., moved a big step closer this week toward building its own "bridge to the future." Two well-known design firms — OMA and OLIN — were selected as the winners of a competition to conceptualize the 11th Street Bridge Park.

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Generation Listen
12:39 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Generation Listen Heads to Life is Beautiful

NPR's Neda Ulaby will interview Nadezhda (Nadya) Tolokonnikova and Maria (Masha) Alekhina of Pussy Riot.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 12:19 pm

As our mantra goes: Stories are everything. A good story can change a life. A great story can change the whole world. It's why we listen.

We'll be taking in a number of stories at the Life is Beautiful festival's Learning Series next week. A robust roster of speakers will share their work, experiences, and groundbreaking ideas.

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Shots - Health News
12:30 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Spike In ER, Hospital Use Short-Lived After Calif. Medicaid Expansion

One rationale for extending Medicaid coverage to more people is to help them get to a doctor or clinic before a minor illness becomes a medical emergency.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 11:02 am

While the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act may lead to a dramatic rise in emergency room use and hospitalizations for previously uninsured people, that increase seems to be largely temporary and should not lead to a dramatic impact on state budgets, according to an analysis from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research released Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Citing Previous Rulings, Federal Judge Throws Out Arizona Gay-Marriage Ban

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 12:07 pm

In a process that will surely be repeated across the United States, a federal judge in Arizona ruled that the state's ban on gay marriage was unconstitutional.

U.S. District Judge John W. Sedwick said that the legal opinion in his circuit is clear: The Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit decided state bans on gay marriage are unconstitutional and the Supreme Court has refused to hear appeals for those cases.

For that reason, Sedwick ordered that the state "permanently cease enforcement of those provisions of Arizona law declared unconstitutional by this order."

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Author Interviews
10:58 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Brings Lessons From Space Down To Earth

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 10:48 am

The former International Space Station commander achieved Internet stardom with his in-space rendition of David Bowie's "Space Oddity." After three missions and a total of six months in space he shares what he's learned in a new book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth.

Originally aired Oct. 30, 2013.

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Author Interviews
10:58 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Brings Lessons From Space Down To Earth

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 10:48 am

The former International Space Station commander achieved Internet stardom with his in-space rendition of David Bowie's "Space Oddity." After three missions and a total of six months in space he shares what he's learned in a new book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth.

Originally aired Oct. 30, 2013.

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Florida 'Loud Music' Shooter Michael Dunn Gets Life In Prison

Michael Dunn talks with a member of his defense team during the first break in his retrial at the Duval County Courthouse in Jacksonville, Fla., in September.
Bob Self AP

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 11:14 am

A Florida man convicted of first-degree murder for fatally shooting a teenager during an argument over loud music has been sentenced to life in prison.

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The Salt
10:46 am
Fri October 17, 2014

At London's Tincan, Eating Canned Fish Is The Height Of Luxury

There's a strong element of buying with your eyes at Tincan. Rows of gourmet-quality tins, beautifully packaged in collectible-worthy cans, are displayed at eye level.
Paul Winch-Furness Courtesy of Tincan

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 11:40 am

In the heart of London's Soho sits a gleaming new restaurant — Tincan. The premise is simple: No kitchen, very few staff, and the menu all comes out of a can. Specifically, canned fish.

To many people, canned food conjures up images of stocking up for winter, emergency rations, or — for Brits — the deprivations of World War II.

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Fri October 17, 2014

White House Appoints An Ebola 'Czar'

Ron Klain (left), then chief of staff for Vice President Joe Biden, talks with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse on Capitol Hill in December 2009.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 10:59 am

Ron Klain, a former White House adviser, has been appointed to head U.S. efforts to combat Ebola.

A White House official says Klain "will report directly to the president's Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco and ... National Security Adviser Susan Rice as he ensures that efforts to protect the American people by detecting, isolating and treating Ebola patients in this country are properly integrated but don't distract from the aggressive commitment to stopping Ebola at the source in West Africa."

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NPR Ed
9:34 am
Fri October 17, 2014

New Research Suggests Small High Schools May Help After All

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 1:05 pm

Findings from a new long-term study of small high schools in New York City show the approach may not only boost a student's chances of enrolling in college but also cost less per graduate.

The city began an intensive push to create smaller learning communities in its high schools in 2002. That year, the city's education department rolled out a districtwide lottery system for high school admission.

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The Salt
9:34 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Startup's New Sprays Promise Longer-Lasting Fruit, Fewer Pesticides

Apples were beginning to ripen Aug. 26 on trees at Carter Hill Orchard in Concord, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 5:08 am

Scientists at startup Apeel Sciences have figured out the secret to doubling lifespans. Not our lifespans, alas, but those of fruits and veggies. And they do it naturally.

It's a big deal. Worldwide, we throw away about a third of our food, some $750 billion per year — and the percentage is even higher in the United States. One reason is rot: Food goes bad before we can bite in.

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StoryCorps
9:33 am
Fri October 17, 2014

For Father-And-Son Locksmiths, The Key Is Hard Work

When Phil Mortillaro dropped out of school in eighth grade, he started work as a locksmith. Now he and his son, Philip Jr., run their own shop in Manhattan.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 5:53 am

Phil Mortillaro and his son, Philip Jr., run Greenwich Locksmiths in Manhattan. The elder Mortillaro has been practicing the trade since he dropped out of school after eighth grade.

"I was one of those kids who would show up when school first started," Phil tells his son on a visit to StoryCorps in New York. "Then they would see me again around Christmastime. And then they would see me in June to tell me that I had to do the grade over again. So dropping out of school was — it was inevitable."

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Monkey See
9:33 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Transparent' And Pop Culture Debuts

NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 5:39 am

For a couple of lovely weeks in October, our dear pal Ari Shapiro — who has long since forgiven us for making him watch the VMAs and Olympus Has Fallen for a prior episode — was back at NPR HQ to host Weekend Edition. While we had him here, we grabbed him up for a conversation about Transparent and pop culture debuts.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Nigerian Truce With Boko Haram Raises Hopes For Schoolgirls' Release

"Bring Back Our Girls" campaigners march during a rally calling for the release of the Abuja schoolgirls who were abducted by Boko Haram militants in Borno state in August.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 10:52 am

Nigeria's army has reportedly reached a cease-fire deal with the extremist group Boko Haram that could lead to the release of more than 200 schoolgirls who were abducted in April and whose release quickly became an international cause.

According to NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, Nigeria's official news agency is quoting the country's defense chief, Air Marshal Alex Badeh, as saying a truce has been reached. Badeh announced the truce and ordered his troops to immediately comply with the agreement, according to The Associated Press.

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Ebola
9:18 am
Fri October 17, 2014

3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse

After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse.
Anders Kelto NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 3:28 pm

Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.

"The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who's in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.

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