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The Two-Way
11:28 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Suspect In Five Seattle Killings Dead, Hospital Says

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 9:03 pm

Seattle police say a gunman suspected of killing three people at a café and one in an apparent carjacking may have shot himself Wednesday as officers closed in on him.

As NPR's Martin Kaste is reporting for our Newscast unit:

"It's not confirmed that the man who shot himself in west Seattle is, in fact, the suspect, but right now that's certainly how things are looking, in terms of what the Seattle Police Department is saying."

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Privatizing liquor
9:28 am
Wed May 30, 2012

Idaho: How will Washington law affect cross-border booze runs?

Could Washington's liquor laws become a boon to Idaho? Photo by Tom Banse

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Washington retailers are getting ready for the 78-year-old state monopoly on liquor sales to end this Friday. It’s not yet clear what privatization will do to the price of alcohol in Washington. One entity with a big stake in the matter … is the state of Idaho.

Some of Idaho’s most profitable state-run liquor stores just happen to be along its northwestern border.

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The Salt
10:00 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Nuclear Tuna Is Hot News, But Not Because It's Going To Make You Sick

A Tokyo sushi restaurant displays blocks of fat meat tuna cut out from a 269kg bluefin tuna.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 2:17 am

What snarky headline writer could resist a story about "hot tuna?" Or how about "tuna meltdown?"

Really, it seems just plain daffy to ignore a new study that says some Pacific bluefin tuna picked up traces of radioactive material from the Fukushima nuclear disaster last year and brought it across the Pacific Ocean.

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Fake drugs
6:54 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Fake Adderall pills hit the market

If the label of ingredients on the Adderall pack says "singel entity," that's a tip-off for trouble.
FDA/Flickr

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 5:48 am

A shortage of Adderall began last year, sending millions of people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy on perpetual wild goose chases to find drugstores with the pills they need to stay alert and focused.

So it's not surprising that Adderall counterfeiters have seized a big marketing opportunity. What is surprising is their clumsiness.

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NPR Tech/Business
2:48 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Facebook stock falls another 9 percent

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 1:52 pm

Facebook's stock fell $3.07 to end the day at $28.84. That's first time it's fallen below $30 since the stock went public.

That price is also 24 percent below its opening price of $38.

The Wall Street Journal that the drop had to do with negative sentiment about the stock, as well as the fact that today traders were able to trade on derivatives.

The Facebook stock saw so much trading, the Journal reports, that it triggered Nasdaq's short sale circuit-breaker.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:52 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Did Life On Earth Originate From Zombie Microbes?

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 12:56 pm

I just wanted to put up a link to a nice story on panspermia, the idea that life began elsewhere in the universe and was somehow transported to Earth. The story comes from a Wired article I stumbled across and gives a new twist to an old idea.

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Afghanistan
7:09 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Afghan Female Boxers Strike A Blow For Girl Power

An Afghan girl takes part in a boxing training session around in a training room at the Kabul stadium, in Kabul in January 2011.
Shah Marai Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 5:52 pm

When Saber Sharifi goes out recruiting girls and young women for his female boxing team in Afghanistan, he encounters a lot of skeptical parents.

"I reassure them that their daughters will not have broken noses on their wedding day," he says with a smile.

Sharifi launched his recruiting campaign in girls' high schools back in 2007. After three months of relentless speeches and presentations, he could only get two girls to sign up.

But he didn't give up. After two more years, he had eight more members on the team.

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Veterans
10:41 am
Mon May 28, 2012

In sweat lodge, vets find healing 'down to the core'

Veterans make preparations for a sweat lodge ceremony at Salt Lake City's Veterans Affairs center.
Taki Telonidis for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 4:38 am

Substance abuse. Violence. Even thoughts of suicide. These are some of the problems that many veterans returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are struggling with.

Today it's called post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, but it has affected veterans going back much farther. While doctors and researchers put enormous efforts into developing new treatments, one group of veterans in Salt Lake City is finding relief in a very old tradition: a Native American sweat lodge.

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Economy
8:39 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Alaska Airlines tries do-it-yourself luggage tagging

Alaska Airlines will try out a new do-it-yourself luggage tagging system at SeaTac. Photo courtesy Alaska Airlines

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 4:49 pm

Alaska Airlines is trying out a new luggage-tagging system at SeaTac Airport. It relies on customers using new kiosks to weigh their own bags and print out and attach labels.

Travelers still must drop off luggage with agents and show I.D. But airline spokeswoman Bobbie Egan says the change should save some time. She says Alaska and its sister carrier Horizon tried out the system last year in Bend.

"We wanted to roll it out very slowly so that we could work out any kinks and basically interact with our customers and find out how they like it."

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NPR tech news
9:52 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

In A World Where One Teen's Voice Is An Internet Hit

Jake Foushee's "movie trailer" voice went viral when he was 14. Now he may be headed for the big screen.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 6:17 pm

Jake Foushee had a cold.

He was 13 at the time, at his home outside Chapel Hill, N.C.

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The Salt
12:02 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

Clean Your Grill, And Other Hot Holiday Tips From Food Network's Alton Brown

Food science guy Alton Brown says the last thing you want to see is flames touching food on the grill.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 12:40 pm

If there's one grilling tip to remember this Memorial Day weekend, it should be this: Flame is bad.

"Flame does nasty things to food," food historian and science guy Alton Brown tells NPR's Scott Simon in the kick-off segment of Weekend Edition's "Taste of Summer" series.

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Air travel
9:35 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Delayed at the airport? They're working on it

An air traffic controller works at the Atlanta TRACON, or terminal radar approach control, facility in Peachtree City, Ga. The FAA's NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 7:52 am

When the summer travel season begins, airline passengers typically brace for delays as vacationers fly in larger numbers and the inevitable weather-related disruptions occur.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the nationwide system of air traffic control, is hoping to make some of those delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls "Next Generation" technology. The NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.

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Health
3:35 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

State audit finds unexplained gaps in children's mental health care

Oregon auditors have found that girls under age 13 and Hispanic youth are using using mental health services at a disproportionately low rate. Photo by HHS.gov

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 3:11 pm

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon needs to do a better job at making sure that low-income children are getting the mental health services they’re eligible for. That's the finding of a new audit by the Oregon Secretary of State's office.

The report applauds the Oregon Health Authority for bringing tens of thousands of additional children into the Medicaid-funded Oregon Health Plan over the past three years.

But auditors found that some groups of children were using mental health services at a disproportionately low rate. They include girls under age 13, and Hispanic youth of all ages.

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War in Afghanistan
3:30 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

UW grad is latest Washington- based soldier killed in Afghanistan

2nd Lt. Travis Morgado was “kind and considerate” says his mother. Photo courtesy of Andrea Velasquez Kessler

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 2:22 pm

The cemetery at Joint Base Lewis-McChord will be the site of a Memorial Day ceremony to honor fallen service members. A University of Washington graduate is among the latest Washington-based soldiers to die in Afghanistan. Army records indicate eight soldiers from the Army post near Tacoma have been killed in action so far this year.

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Health news
7:54 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Dispatchers' CPR coaching saves lives when every minute counts

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her son Ryan when she passed out. Her husband performed CPR for six minutes with the help of a dispatcher before medics arrived.
Courtesy of Medic One Foundation

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 7:09 am

Your chances of surviving a sudden heart attack may depend on where you live; some American cities have survival rates five times higher than others. One difference can be 911 dispatchers.

If they coach someone over the phone to give CPR, the chance of surviving goes up. There's now a push to make it universal, but some cities are slow to implement the necessary training.

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her fourth child when she collapsed against the bathroom door. It was January 2011 in the Seattle suburb of Woodinville.

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