News From NPR

Pages

The Two-Way
9:11 am
Tue January 31, 2012

Stephen Colbert Says His SuperPAC Raised $1 Million

Comedian Stephen Colbert at a campaign stop in Charleston, South Carolina.
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 7:44 am

"I'm rolling seven digits deep!" is what Stephen Colbert told the Federal Election Commission in his superPAC's filing this morning.

The comedian said that as of January 30, his political action committee had collected $1,023,121.24 in donations.

Read more
The Salt
5:04 pm
Mon January 30, 2012

Here's a pie in your eye: A brief history of food fights

Communist party lawmaker Liana Kanelli enters her car after protesters threw yogurt on her face as she tried to reach the Greek parliament during a 48-hour general strike in Athens in 2011.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 3:19 pm

Last week, 500 tacos appeared at the mayor's office in East Haven, Conn. But they weren't intended for a casual luncheon.

Instead, this truckload of tacos was meant to be a symbol of discontent. An immigration reform group sent the fare in protest to what they said was an insensitive comment from Mayor Joseph Maturo in reference to Latinos and tacos.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:59 pm
Mon January 30, 2012

What The FBI Wants In A Social Media Monitoring App

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 9:02 pm

The FBI has raised eyebrows in the tech world with a public document that asks for advice on how to harvest information from social networking sites.

Read more
Fighting Depression
10:57 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Could a club drug offer 'almost immediate' relief from depression?

Ketamine has been used as an anesthetic for decades. It's also a widely popular but illegal club drug known as "Special K." When administered in low doses, patients report a rapid reduction in depression symptoms.
Huw Golledge flickr

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 9:01 pm

There's no quick fix for severe depression.

Although antidepressants like Prozac have been around since the 1970s, they usually take weeks to make a difference. And for up to 40 percent of patients, they simply don't work.

As a result, there are limited options when patients show up in an emergency room with suicidal depression.

The doctors and nurses at Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston say they see this problem every day.

Read more
Economy
8:49 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Boeing makes its largest-ever European sale

Oslo-based Norwegian Air Shuttle is the first European carrier to buy Boeing's revamped 737 MAX. Photo courtesy of Boeing

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 2:49 pm

The Boeing Company ended 2011 having sold about half as many airplanes as its France-based rival, Airbus. Now, less than a month into the new year, Boeing has inked its largest deal ever with a European airline. The aerospace giant is on track to overtake Airbus for the first time in years.

Oslo-based Norwegian Air Shuttle is the first European carrier to buy Boeing's revamped 737 MAX — 100 of them. The deal is seen as another industry vote of confidence in the updated version of Boeing's workhorse model.

Read more
Digital Life
4:39 pm
Sun January 29, 2012

Can capitalism keep Google from becoming evil?

A sign for Google is displayed behind the Google android robot, at the National Retail Federation, in New York. The announced changes to Google's privacy policy has drawn both positive and negative attention.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 2:28 pm

Let's start with a quick Google experiment.

Read more
Digital Life
2:24 pm
Sun January 29, 2012

On Amazon, an uneasy mix of plagiarism and erotica

An article in Fast Company magazine looks at plagiarism in the world of self-published ebooks on Amazon.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 9:26 am

Unlike traditional publishing companies, self-publishing programs like Amazon's Kindle Select lack the keen eyes of publishers, leaving room for copyright violations — and plagiarism.

Sharazade is the pen name of a writer and editor who is a rising star on Amazon's erotica section.

"I do a lot of traveling, and most of my stories are travel-based in some way, either set in an exotic location or having to do with modes of transportation ... or airports, airplanes, buses," she tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

Read more
All Tech Considered
9:35 am
Sun January 29, 2012

Clean up or quit: Facebook timeline brings back the past

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg shows Timeline during the f/8 conference in San Francisco in September.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 1:17 am

Facebook's Timeline — the long-anticipated overhaul of the site — is rolling out across the world this week.

Timeline allows friends to surf through all your posts going back to the beginning of Facbeook time. Graphically it can be a beautiful thing. Mark Zuckerberg calls it a chance for users to tell the stories of their lives. And over the next few weeks users across the world will get it on their profile.

Read more
Religion
9:22 am
Sun January 29, 2012

In France, 'de-baptism' seen as backlash to pedophile scandals

Though marginal, the de-baptism movement is growing, observers say.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 2:57 am

In France, an elderly man is fighting to make a formal break with the Catholic Church. He's taken the church to court over its refusal to let him nullify his baptism, in a case that could have far-reaching effects.

Seventy-one-year-old Rene LeBouvier's parents and his brother are buried in a churchyard in the tiny village of Fleury in northwest France. He himself was baptized in the Romanesque stone church and attended mass here as a boy.

Read more
Business
6:35 pm
Sat January 28, 2012

Made in the USA: Saving the American brand

General Motors, headquartered in Detroit, recovered from near disaster after a financial bailout from the federal government.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 2:16 pm

A majestic building still dominates the skyline of Rochester, N.Y., the word "Kodak" shining brightly from the top. It's the legacy of George Eastman — the founder of the Eastman Kodak Co. — a company that helped Rochester thrive and gave it the nickname "Kodak Town."

In 1976, Kodak sold 90 percent of the film around the world. The company basically invented digital photography, but it couldn't figure out how to make the transition from film quickly enough to out-compete its Asian rivals. Of the 20 best-selling digital cameras in the U.S., not a single one is from Kodak.

Read more
Books
6:28 pm
Sat January 28, 2012

'The Snowy Day': Breaking color barriers, quietly

With special permission from The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 7:13 am

One morning many years ago, a little boy in Brooklyn named Peter woke up to an amazing sight: fresh snow.

Peter is the hero of the classic children's book by Ezra Jack Keats, The Snowy Day, which turns 50 this year. Peter has a red snowsuit, a stick just right for knocking snow off of trees, and a snowball in his pocket. And, though this is never mentioned in the text, Peter is African-American.

Read more
Art & Design
11:40 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Pollock's legend still splattered on art world

Influenced by Mexican and Native American art, Pollock popularized action-painting and drip style, as seen in Number 7, 1951.
Pollock-Krasner Foundation, National Gallery of Art/Artists Rights Society

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 10:55 am

Even a century since his birth, American "splatter artist" Jackson Pollock still provokes heated debate about the very definition of art.

Was a man who placed a canvas on the floor and dripped paint straight from the can actually creating a work of art?

"It's very hard if you try to build the paint up to this extent with this many colors and not achieve mud," says National Gallery of Art curator Harry Cooper.

Read more
Election 2012
9:41 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Why new photo ID laws mean some won't vote

Stickers at a Nevada polling place on Election Day 2010.
Max Whittaker Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 9:55 am

The argument over whether voters should have to present photo identification at the polls usually splits along party lines. Republicans who favor the requirement say it prevents ballot fraud. Democrats and election rights groups who oppose it say it is meant to suppress turnout.

And people of all political stripes wonder what all the fuss is about.

Read more
The Salt
9:38 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Deception diet: How optical illusions can trick your appetite

The Delboeuf illusion makes one dot appear larger than the other. But they're the same size. Your brain is misled by comparing the dots to the surrounding circles.
Washiucho Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 11:12 am

Think you know how to avoid overeating? Think again.

Research suggests that choices, like how much to eat during a meal, are often made subconsciously. Trouble is, our brains are hard-wired to mislead us in lots of little ways, which can have a big impact on our diets.

Take the Delboeuf effect, an optical illusion first documented in 1865. It starts with two dots of equal size. But surround one dot with a large circle and the other dot with a small one, and suddenly the second dot looks bigger.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
11:22 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Study: 1 in 14 People Has Oral HPV Infection

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 9:50 am

So how many people have human papillomavirus in their mouths?

Quite a few, say researchers who got more than 5,000 volunteers across the country to spit into a cup and answer detailed questions about their sex lives.

The bottom line: 6.9 percent of people in the U.S. (ages 14 to 69) have oral infections with HPV. Some types of HPV are linked to cancer and genital warts.

Read more

Pages