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NPR Economy
8:47 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Are today's Millennials the 'screwed generation'?

Graduates attend a ceremony at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Writer Joel Kotkin notes that many recent college grads are saddled with high debt and dim job prospects.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 3:18 pm

U.S. student loan debt tops $1 trillion, and young people face disproportionately high unemployment. Writer Joel Kotkin points to these numbers when he claims today's millennial generation is getting the short end of the stick. Kotkin speaks with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about his Newsweek/Daily Beast article on what he calls the "screwed generation."

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First Listen
8:30 pm
Sun September 2, 2012

First Listen: David Byrne & St. Vincent, 'Love This Giant'

David Byrne and St. Vincent's new album, Love This Giant, comes out Sept. 11.
Andreas Laszlo Konrath Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 8:47 am

Audio for this feature is no longer available.

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Remembrances
2:00 pm
Sun September 2, 2012

Rev. Moon, A 'Savior' To Some, Lived A Big Dream

Moon and his wife are introduced during the Affirmation of Vows part of the Interreligious and International Couple's Blessing and Rededication Ceremony, 2002, at New York's Manhattan Center. Some 500 to 600 couples participated in the New York ceremony, and an estimated 21 million couples participated worldwide via a simulcast to 185 countries.
Stephen Chernin AP

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 3:57 pm

Rev. Sun Myung Moon died Sunday at age 92. The controversial founder of the Unification Church was known for attracting young converts in the 1970s and for conducting mass weddings.

Sun Myung Moon was born in 1920 to a poor family in what is now North Korea. His life took a dramatic turn on Easter Sunday, 1936, when, he says, Jesus appeared before him. As he told cartoonist and interviewer Al Capp, Moon recognized Jesus from a vision he had had at age 3. Moon said he spoke with Jesus in Korean.

"We carried conversation with mind-to-mind, heart-to-heart," Moon said.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Sun September 2, 2012

Rev. Sun Myung Moon, Founder Of Unification Church, Dies

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 2:44 pm

Rev. Sun Myung Moon, the founder of the Unification Church, has died in South Korea. He was 92.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:16 am
Sun September 2, 2012

An 'amusing' set of 19th century riddles

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 7:01 am

On-air challenge: Answer riddles from The Amusing Puzzle Book, published circa the 1840s:

  • I know a word of letters three, add two, and fewer there will be.
  • Without a bridle or a saddle, across a thing I ride astraddle. And those I ride, by help of me, though almost blind, are made to see.
  • What is that which has been tomorrow and will be yesterday?
  • Clothed in yellow, red and green, I prate before the king and queen. Of neither house nor land possessed, by lords and ladies, I'm caressed.
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Asia
6:52 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Pakistan's Lone Brewery Sets Sights On India

Isphanyar Bhandara, the head of Pakistan's only brewery, Murree Brewery, sits at his grandfather's desk at the headquarters in Rawalpindi, near Islamabad. Bhandara's grandfather was a director at the brewery when Pakistan gained independence in 1947, and he bought a controlling stake in the company. The brewery has been run by the Bhandara family ever since.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 8:46 pm

Islamic Pakistan has just one brewery, but it has a rich history.

Bottles of beer have been rolling off Murree Brewery's assembly line since 1860, when the company was founded outside the capital Islamabad — making it Pakistan's oldest private company.

"The brewery was here before Pakistan was here," says CEO Isphanyar Bhandara.

Sitting at his grandfather's desk, he tastes new samples and describes how he ended up running a brewery in a Muslim country, where alcohol is virtually banned.

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Weather
9:24 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Dry spell likely to continue in Northwest

This summer in the Northwest has been one of the driest on record. Photo by Chris Phan via Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 4:47 pm

Northwesterners heading out for the Labor Day weekend have a pretty good chance of staying dry. The region is in the midst of one of the driest streaks on record. And there's little chance of that changing soon.

It hasn't been your imagination. It's been really dry in the Northwest this summer. In fact, it's been mid-July since Seattle, Portland and Boise have recorded any measurable precipitation.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' Author Richard Bach Injured In Plane Crash

A file photo of author Richard Bach, in 1975.
Associated Press

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 1:02 pm

Pilot and author Richard Bach was hurt Friday when the small plane he was flying tangled in power lines as he attempted to land, according to media reports.

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

White House releases two of Obama's favorite beer recipes

President Obama drinks a beer — that's presumably not from the White House — as he watches the U.S. men's basketball team play Brazil in an Olympic exhibition game in July.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 2:48 pm

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2012 elections
4:19 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

New age spiritual leader risks 'ridicule' to support Washington Dems

The gate to Ramtha's School of Enlightenment, Yelm, Washington. Photo by Richard David Ramsey via Wikipedia

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 3:49 pm

She is perhaps the Northwest’s most famous new age spiritual leader. JZ Knight of the Ramtha School of Enlightenment in Southwest Washington. Now Knight has a new role: major political donor. She recently wrote a $50,000 check to the state Democratic Party.

JZ Knight says she’s always been political. But she was reluctant to associate herself with the candidates she supports.

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News
11:26 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Wash. Supreme Court Ruling Clears Way For Lawsuit Over Tribal Gas Stations

Gas station owners in Washington say the tax refund the state gives tribal gas stations gives the tribes a competitive advantage. Photo by Kristen Steele

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 7:52 am

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Gas station owners in Washington have won the right to proceed with a lawsuit against the state. They’re challenging the policy of gas tax refunds to Native American tribes who operate their own gas stations.

Non-tribal gas station owners in Washington are on edge. They’ve witnessed a sharp growth in the number of tribally-owned gas stations in the state. There are now more than 50.

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NW Forest health
10:59 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Scientists look for ways to restore Northwest's sick forests

Scorched earth and trees from the Taylor Bridge fire not far from Liberty, Wash. Photo by Anna King

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 8:06 am

LIBERTY, Wash. – This week fire crews declared the Taylor Bridge fire 100 percent contained. Now that the massive blaze in central Washington is controlled forest scientists say Northwest residents should brace for more large fires like this. Munching insects, parasitic plants and global climate change are part of the problem.

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2012 elections
5:16 am
Fri August 31, 2012

A Fine Night For Romney, But No Game Change

Mitt Romney accepts the Republican nomination for president at the party's convention Thursday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 10:17 pm

It's been the political world's obsession for weeks leading into the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

Would nominee Mitt Romney manage what would be miraculous for any candidate, and in a handful of days and one big speech wash away the problems of a modern candidacy?

Turns out Romney's moment Thursday night was a fine one, if not a great one.

His speech continued the campaign's concerted effort to reach out to skeptical female voters, reminding the audience that his strong mother ran for Senate.

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Diversions
7:18 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Pet Food Bank Faces Challenging Transition

Portland's Pongo Fund, one of the nation's largest pet food banks, is moving to a new location. Image by The Pongo Fund

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:08 pm

One of the nation's largest pet food banks is being forced to move. The Pongo Fund distributes tons of pet food to low-income animal lovers each year in Oregon and Washington. But problems at its central distribution center will mean a break in distributing pet food this fall.

Larry Chusid was inspired to start the Pongo Fund three years ago when he learned that many struggling, hungry pet owners would give a portion of their human food to help sustain their pets.

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NPR science
5:28 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Pinky DNA Points To Clues About Ancient Humans

A replica of the pinky bone fragment found in a Siberian cave. Researchers used the bone bit to extract and sequence the genome of a girl who lived tens of thousands of years ago.
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:09 pm

Scientists in Germany have been able to get enough DNA from a fossilized pinky to produce a high-quality DNA sequence of the pinky's owner.

"It's a really amazing-quality genome," says David Reich of Harvard Medical School in Boston. "It's as good as modern human genome sequences, from a lot of ways of measuring it."

The pinky belonged to a girl who lived tens of thousands of years ago. Scientists aren't sure about the exact age. She is a member of an extinct group of humans called Denisovans. The name comes from Denisova cave in Siberia, where the pinky was found.

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