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If you want to know whether Hillary Clinton will stay close to Bernie Sanders in New Hampshire on Tuesday or are looking for an early hint of how the Republican race will end up, here's a tip: Keep an eye on Rochester.

Two passenger trains crashed in southern Germany on Tuesday, killing at least 10 people and wounding 80 — 17 of them critically. According to Bavarian police, one person is still missing. The accident in Bavaria happened shortly before 7:00 a.m. local time.

The chances of being struck and killed by space debris are minuscule, but that's no comfort to the family of a bus driver in India, who died yesterday after being hit by what local officials say was a meteorite.

The man, identified as V. Kamaraj, who drove a bus for Bharathidasan Engineering College in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, was walking near "the area where the object struck," The Wall Street Journal reports. It adds:

The wife of a dead ISIS leader has been charged with having a "role in a conspiracy that resulted in the death of American citizen Kayla Mueller in February 2015," Justice Department documents say.

Nisreen Assad Ibrahim Bahar, also known as Umm Sayyaf, is an Iraqi citizen and was the wife of ISIS leader Abu Sayyaf before he was killed in a U.S. military operation last year.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee has cancelled a series of regularly scheduled meetings with the Republican leader of the state Senate. The move follows Friday’s surprise vote by Senate Republicans to oust Inslee’s Secretary of Transportation.

Customers of Portland-based health insurance company Moda should rest assured their policies will be honored. That was the message from state regulators Monday after they announced a consent order meant to keep the company afloat.

The privatization of retail liquor sales in Washington state has delivered a sustained boost to the state liquor divisions in neighboring Idaho and Oregon.

The problems with high lead levels in Flint, Mich.'s water started in April 2014, when the city switched water sources and began drawing its supply from the Flint River. The new water was harder, and government officials allowed it to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water.

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada will cease its airstrikes against self-proclaimed Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria by Feb. 22.

It will remain part of the coalition targeting the militants.

Until very recently it was thought that just one bacterium was to blame for causing Lyme disease in humans. But it turns out that a second, related bug can cause it too.

In 2013, during routine testing of bacterial DNA floating around in the blood samples of people suspected of having Lyme disease, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., realized they were looking at something different.

If you watched Sunday's Super Bowl, how did you get it? Over cable? Rabbit ears? (Yes, those still work.) Or did you stream it online?

Do you know any global health stories that should be getting coverage — but are overlooked by the media?

The Gulf of Mexico is now open for commercial fish farming.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last month that, for the first time in the U.S., companies can apply to set up fish farms in federal waters.

The idea is to compete with hard-to-regulate foreign imports. But opening the Gulf to aquaculture won't be cheap, and it could pose environmental problems.

A plan to hike Oregon's minimum wage is moving forward in the Oregon Legislature. A measure cleared a committee Friday and is headed for a vote on the Senate floor.

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi rolled up with his motorcade over a massive red carpet to the opening of a social housing project, sparking outrage about apparent wastefulness in a country suffering from high levels of poverty.

According to local media reports, the red carpet was rolled out in 6th of October City, a suburb of Egypt's capital Cairo.

Forget about the conventional wisdom that female genital mutilation, or FGM, rarely takes place outside of Africa and the Middle East. Recalibrate that to 30 countries on several continents, according to a new statistical analysis by UNICEF that calculates that at least 200 million females today have undergone some form of the procedure.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee took the gloves off Monday and launched a full-throated attack on Senate Republicans for sacking his Secretary of Transportation in a surprise move last Friday afternoon. 

The Stream is your source for news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in New Hampshire. For more coverage and analysis visit NPR Politics or elections.npr.org.

Former President Bill Clinton levied an extended criticism of Bernie Sanders at a campaign stop in which he took issue with "sexist" attacks against his wife.

In the stretch run before the New Hampshire primary, the former president accused Sanders' supporters of slinging vitriol toward Clinton's female supporters, citing the tale of one female blogger who was bullied online.

At more than 1,100 feet long, it's large enough to hold more than 6,100 people — but on Sunday, a 168,000-ton Royal Caribbean cruise ship was tossed around by a winter storm that damaged the craft and left four people with minor injuries.

Photos sent by passengers aboard the Anthem of the Seas show high winds, turbulent seas and leaning decks.

Out for dinner with a group of friends, Christina Dierkes, a science writer with Ohio Sea Grant in Columbus, was feeling adventurous. It took some steely courage to order the Caribbean Roll at Mr. Sushi's. Not so much for the tuna and avocado on the inside — that's a combination that's appealing to many of us. But the tuna sushi in this spectacularly Americanized roll is topped with a deep-fried banana, honey, mayonnaise and a generous dash of coconut crumbs. Yum?

At midnight Tuesday the residents of tiny Dixville Notch, N.H., will welcome camera crews for the quadrennial ritual of casting the first votes in the nation's first presidential primary.

The remote town near the Canadian border is so small that it has only a roomful of registered voters and zero racial diversity. Its votes in recent cycles have been unreliable indicators of who will win the primary.

But the cameras will be there, nonetheless, because it is first, and because it is a tradition.

Tweeting an image of football cleats hanging on a wire and one emoji — of a peace sign — was all running back Marshawn Lynch needed to do to get people thinking that he's retiring from football. Lynch, whose reticence regarding the media is legendary, was quickly saluted by his Seattle Seahawks teammates.

The Seahawks haven't officially said Lynch is retiring, and it's highly unlikely that he would hold a news conference to make his plans known and to banter with reporters about his favorite moments in the NFL.

After an airplane passenger set off a bomb last week, the pilot managed to land the plane safely in Mogadishu, Somalia. Now CCTV footage released by the Somali government indicates airport workers may have been in on the attack.

The only casualty of the attack was the bomber, who apparently was sucked out of the hole in the side of the plane.

NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast unit that the bomber was originally scheduled to fly on a Turkish Airlines flight. Here's more from Gregory:

Police Add Warning To Refuge Roadblock

Feb 8, 2016

The new lighted sign changes from "Road Closed" to "No Unlawful Entry" to "Subject To Arrest."

It's the latest indication that the coalition of law enforcement guarding the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have no interest in additional militia members, media or curious members of the public getting within five miles of the headquarters.

On the southwestern tip of the Korean Peninsula, laid out across ferry-filled harbors and rolling hillsides, is a vibrant port city called Mokpo.

Famous for its Japanese colonial architecture and for being the jumping-off point to scenic islands like Heuksan and Jeju— the "Hawaii of Korea" — Mokpo is also known for its fishing industry and its local seafood delicacy: hongeo.

For more than two decades, New Hampshire has been a place of redemption for the Clintons. That could come to an end Tuesday night.

The Granite State revived Hillary Clinton's 2008 campaign after a devastating Iowa loss to Barack Obama. That victory helped her become the new "Comeback Kid" — the same moniker her husband claimed after his strong finish in the state in 1992 jump-started his road to the Democratic nomination.

Only a few people survived when a boat carrying migrants capsized in the Aegean Sea on Monday, Turkish Coast Guard officials say. More than two dozen people perished — including about a dozen children.

Taiwanese President-elect Tsai Ing-wen is promising extensive safety checks of old buildings two days after an earthquake killed at least 38 people, according to local media. New questions emerged after stacks of cans were found in the walls of a 17-story building that was the scene of all but two of those deaths.

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