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Shots - Health News
11:40 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Middle East Virus Spreads Between Hospitalized Patients

The new coronavirus has a crown of tentacles on its surface when viewed under the microscope.
NIAID/RML

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 11:06 am

It's been eight months since a Saudi Arabian doctor described a previously unknown virus related to SARS. And for most of that time only germ geeks paid much attention.

But in the past few days the new virus — which some would like to call MERS-CoV, for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus — has been making up for lost time.

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Shots - Health News
9:50 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Teens Who Text And Drive Often Take Other Risks

Dylan Young, then 18, posed for a photo as a vehicle cruised by North Arlington, N.J., in June 2012. Young was in a fender-bender accident caused by being distracted while texting and driving.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 8:21 am

Almost half of teenagers cop to texting while driving. And those texting teens are more likely to make other risky moves while in the car, too.

That includes not wearing seat belts, drinking and driving, and riding with a driver who's been drinking, a study just published in the journal Pediatrics finds.

Car crashes have long been the leading cause of death for teenagers, even before texting entered the scene.

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Art & Design
11:36 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Litterbugs beware: Turning found DNA into portraits

Self portrait by Heather Dewey-Hagborg. Portrait generated from her own DNA.
Heather Dewey-Hagborg Heather Dewey-Hagborg

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 2:22 pm

Heather Dewey-Hagborg was sitting in a therapy session a while ago and noticed a painting on the wall. The glass on the frame was cracked, and lodged in the crack was a single hair. She couldn't take her eyes off it.

"I just became obsessed with thinking about whose hair that was, and what they might look like, and what they might be like," she says.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
9:50 am
Sun May 12, 2013

A Mother's Day gift that makes you feel better, too

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 1:41 pm

Dear reader,

Mother's Day is upon us and I'm here to share some news with you. While there's nothing wrong with a well-chosen gift, recent research in psychology suggests your time might be better spent writing a well-crafted card to mom.

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The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
9:57 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Sequester Has Air Force Clipping Its Wings

To save money, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina is keeping some of its pilots out of the sky.
Airman 1st Class Aubrey White U.S. Air Force

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:58 am

The Pentagon says the automatic budget cuts known as sequestration could leave the U.S. with a military that is simply unprepared for the most challenging combat missions. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told Congress in April that the military is eating its seed corn.

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Shots - Health News
10:54 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Kids with autism detect motion twice as fast

Did you see that?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 4:37 am

Children with autism see simple movements twice as fast as other children their age, a new study finds.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the University of Rochester were looking to test a common theory about autism which holds that overwhelming sensory stimulation inhibits other brain functions. The researchers figured they could check that by studying how kids with autism process moving images.

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The Salt
6:15 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Wrigley: Maybe we won't sell caffeinated gum after all

Wrigley took its new Alert Energy Caffeine Gum off the market after it prompted FDA scrutiny of caffeinated foods.
Wrigley Incorporated

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:20 am

Less than two weeks after launching its Alert Energy Caffeine Gum, the Wrigley Company decided that maybe the world wasn't ready for amped-up chewing gum after all.

On April 30, the day after Alert Energy launched, the Food and Drug Administration said it was going to take a "fresh look" at caffeinated foods, particularly their effect on children and teenagers.

Being out front on caffeinated confections evidently wasn't a comfortable place to be.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:49 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Cultural sexism: What if Amanda Knox had been Andrew Knox?

Amanda Knox listens to questions during her trial in Perugia, Italy, on June 12, 2009.
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 10:49 am

Sexual thrill-seeker. Sex-mad flatmate.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Using Bacteria To Swat Malaria Inside Mosquitoes

More than a hundred different species of Anopheles mosquitoes can transmit malaria to people.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 8:10 am

It's a bit like probiotics for mosquitoes.

When scientists infect mosquitoes with a specific bacterium, the insects become resistant to the malaria parasite.

Sounds like an easy way to stamp out malaria, right? Just introduce the infected mosquitoes into an area and let the bugs take over the natural population.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:58 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Moths that drive cars—no, really!

YouTube

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 7:07 am

What you are about to see — and I'm not making this up — is a moth driving a car.

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Politics
10:43 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Push to end teens' distracted driving targets parents, peers

A screengrab from Brittany Anne Devasure's winning Project Yellow Light video, aimed at discouraging distracted driving.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:55 pm

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It's All Politics
3:14 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Census: Black voting surpassed white in 2012

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at Cleveland Avenue Baptist Church in Kansas City, Mo., on Nov. 6, 2012.
Julie Denesha Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 7:46 pm

Black voters showed up at the polls at higher rates than whites in last year's presidential election, driving the rate of minority participation to historic levels, a new government report shows.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Syria gets its Internet back

Syrians check e-mails, chat and connect to their Facebook accounts in 2011 at an Internet cafe in Damascus.
Muzaffar Salman AP

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 11:22 am

Internet access appears to be returning in Syria after an outage hit most of the war-torn country, according to web monitoring firm Renesys.

It estimates the web blackout began Tuesday night and lasted for nearly 20 hours but tweeted Wednesday afternoon that "platform traffic to the country is increasing."

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Global health
1:06 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Why Bill Gates Thinks Ending Polio Is Worth It

There's no better deal than getting polio cases down to zero, philanthropist Bill Gates says.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 1:28 pm

Some critics say that ending polio has become Bill Gates' "white whale."

Why not just settle for the huge drop in polio cases that we've seen over the past decade and then spend money on other things that kill so many more kids, like diarrhea and malnutrition?

"Polio is special," Gates tells NPR's Robert Siegel on All Things Considered. "Once you get it done, you save $2 billion a year that will be applied to those other activities. There's no better deal economically to getting to zero."

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The Salt
5:45 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Bee Deaths May Have Reached A Crisis Point For Crops

A bee inspector checks on a frame of bees to assess the colony strength near Turlock, Calif., in February. More than 30 percent of America's bee colonies died off over the winter.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 7:56 pm

According to a new survey of America's beekeepers, almost a third of the country's honeybee colonies did not make it through the winter.

That's been the case, in fact, almost every year since the U.S. Department of Agriculture began this annual survey, six years ago.

Over the past six years, on average, 30 percent of all the honeybee colonies in the U.S. died off over the winter. The worst year was five years ago. Last year was the best: Just 22 percent of the colonies died.

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