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The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

WATCH: Moore Tornado As Seen From Space

A NOAA satellite image of the Moore tornado.
NOAA

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 2:23 pm

When it became clear that the conditions over Moore, Okla. were ripe for a huge tornado, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration put its GOES-13 satellite into high gear.

Instead of imaging the earth every 30 minutes, it was doing it every 5 minutes. The images it beamed back are stunning. Here's a time-lapse video that NOAA put together and released today:

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The Salt
12:28 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Vertical 'pinkhouses:' The future of urban farming?

This "pinkhouse" at Caliber Biotherapeutics in Bryan, Texas, grows 2.2 million plants under the glow of blue and red LEDs.
Courtesy of Caliber Therapeutics

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 2:58 pm

The idea of vertical farming is all the rage right now. Architects and engineers have come up with spectacular concepts for lofty buildings that could function as urban food centers of the future.

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Technology
10:58 am
Tue May 21, 2013

My Social Security Number Is Posted Where?

The private information Linda Mendez submitted to get discount cellphone service appeared on a publicly accessible website.
Matt Anzur Scripps Howard News Service

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 11:26 am

Sensitive personal information belonging to thousands of applicants to a government phone program was exposed to the public on the Internet, according to a new investigative report from Scripps Howard News Service.

The federal program is called Lifeline, and it reimburses phone companies for providing service to low-income Americans.

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The Picture Show
10:37 am
Tue May 21, 2013

'Nanogardens' sprout up on the surface of a penny

Nanoflowers, each smaller than the thickness of a dollar bill, sprout up spontaneously on a surface dipped in salts and silicon.
Courtesy of Wim Noorduin/Harvard University

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 2:36 pm

April showers bring May flowers. But in this case, the blossoms are too small for even a bumblebee to see.

Engineers at Harvard University have figured out a way to make microscopic sculptures of roses, tulips and violets, each smaller than a strand of hair.

To get a sense of just how small these flower sculptures are, grab a penny and flip it on its back. Right in the middle of the Lincoln Memorial, you'll see a faint impression of Abraham Lincoln. These roses would make a perfect corsage for the president's jacket lapel.

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The Two-Way
7:51 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

A Brief History Of Oklahoma Tornadoes

Destruction at Midwest City, Okla., one of the towns hit by the May 5, 1999, tornadoes.
Jerry Laizure AP

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 1:58 am

Although Oklahoma is a state where tornadoes are a fact of life, few days stand out like May 3, 1999.

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The Two-Way
5:47 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Tweets Capture 'Shock And Awe' At Tornado's Deadly Power

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 1:56 am

Our colleague Andy Carvin has scanned Twitter in search of reaction, including photos and video, from the massive tornado that swept through central Oklahoma on Monday.

Among the tweets:

Sidney Montoya of Oklahoma City says he is "Praying for my little cousins in Moore, their elementary school just got hit by the tornado."

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The Salt
12:42 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Washington State Butcher Spikes Pig Feed With Weed

William von Schneidau, who owns the BB Ranch butcher shop at Pike Place Market in Seattle, has made prosciutto from pigs fed marijuana.
Courtesy of BB Ranch

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:25 am

William von Schneidau, an intrepid butcher in Seattle, is giving a whole new meaning to "potbelly pig." Lately, he's been feeding marijuana refuse to the pigs he turns into prosciutto for BB Ranch, his butcher shop in the city's famous Pike Place Marke

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The Salt
9:30 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Can a piece of hair reveal how much Coke or Pepsi you drink?

Carbon isotope analysis: a scientific way to know just how much soda kids are drinking behind parents' backs?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 9:00 am

One way to know how much soda people drink is to ask them.

The problem? We tend to underestimate, lie or forget what we've consumed.

And this is a challenge for researchers who study the links between sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:14 pm
Sat May 18, 2013

David Foster Wallace Tells Us About Freedom

YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 8:24 am

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Flaxseed: The next superfood for cattle and beef?

NBO3 launched its enriched ground beef at the Tops grocery chain in New York in March.
Courtesy of NBO3

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:41 am

Flax is the oily seed usually spotted in the nutritional supplement or cereal aisles. It's marketed as a superfood because of its high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and fiber.

Omega-3s may do all kinds of good things for humans — like protect against Alzheimer's, heart disease and even cancer — so it seems reasonable to think they could also protect the health of animals.

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Shots - Health News
11:44 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Up for discussion: Cost of cancer care avoided too often

A cancer pill can cost patients more than the same treatment given as an infusion.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 10:58 am

When the diagnosis is cancer, the expenses can pile up in a hurry.

Even people with insurance can face steep copayments for drugs, a sizable share of hospital bills and significant incidentals. These side effects of cancer care are sometimes even called "financial toxicity."

So wouldn't it make sense for doctors and patients to talk over the financial strain that cancer treatment might bring and what might be done to manage it?

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Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Biking To Work: Healthful Until You Hit A Pothole

Bartender Matt Carucci told NPR in 2012 that he rarely feels safe biking in the city but often rides without a helmet anyway. "There are a lot of other ways to hurt yourself," he said.
John Rose NPR

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:19 am

There's a lot to love about biking to work: the exercise, the fresh air, the cost savings and the benefits for the environment.

But does it make you healthier?

That's a question that's not as easy to answer as you might think. But since today is Bike to Work Day, we'll give it a try.

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The Salt
1:43 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

No More Smuggling: Many Cured Italian Meats Coming To America

Even Sophia Loren felt compelled to smuggle mortadella, despite a U.S. ban — well, her character did, anyway, in the 1971 film Lady Liberty.
Warner Bros/The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 8:36 am

American gourmets and lovers of Italian food products, your days as food smugglers are over.

No more stuffing your suitcases with delicacies bought in Italy, hoping the sniffer dogs at JFK or other American airports won't detect the banned-in-the-USA foodstuffs inside your luggage.

In the U.S., they're called cured meats, the French say charcuterie and in Italy, the word for cured-pork products is salumi.

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Parallels
1:03 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Underground tunnels feed Gaza's hankering for KFC

KFC is delivered in one of the many underground smuggling tunnels connecting Egypt to the Gaza Strip city of Rafah.
Wissam Nassar Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 7:38 am

Hundreds of underground passageways wind like a maze beneath the Egypt-Gaza border, providing a way for Gazans to maneuver around the 2007 Israeli-led economic blockade that took effect after Hamas took control of the Gaza Strip.

And while subterranean tunnels may seem like something out of a thrilling spy movie, the reality and practicality of these channels is somehow not surprising.

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Shots - Health News
9:37 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Human Scent Is Even Sweeter For Malaria Mosquitoes

An Anopheles gambiae mosquito feasts on a human.
Jim Gathany CDC

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:13 am

People smell yummy to mosquitoes.

So yummy, in fact, that our scent is a big way the pesky insects track us down.

But just how much mosquitoes like Eau de Human may not be entirely up to the bugs.

Mosquitoes are more attracted to human odors when they're infected with the malaria parasite, scientists reported Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

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