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Deceptive Cadence
10:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Watch: A mind-blowing visualization of 'The Rite of Spring'

Stephen Malinowski

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:28 am

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Japan's ANA Puts Its 787 Dreamliners Back In Service

All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 Dreamliner takes off from Chitose airport in Hokkaido, northern Japan, for Tokyo's Haneda airport on Sunday.
Jiji Press AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:30 am

Japan's All Nippon Airways put its fleet of Boeing 787s back in service Sunday. If you remember, the Dreamliners were grounded for four months after two separate airplanes had issues with their batteries overheating.

The BBC reports that the first Dreamliner flight landed at Tokyo's Haneda airport after a short flight from Sapporo today. The BBC adds:

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The Salt
12:23 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Meet London's Master Architects In Jell-0

Sam Bompas (left) and Harry Parr made names for themselves with spectacular gelatin creations.
Courtesy of Sam Bompas

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 10:05 am

Banana-flavored vapors? A pineapple island?

These may sound like the makings of a Roald Dahl children's book (he of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory fame). But at London's Kew Gardens, visitors can now immerse themselves in such fantastic-sounding experiences like rowing down a blue-dyed boating lake to the aforementioned island, which features a 15-foot replica pineapple towering over a banana grotto.

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The Two-Way
12:19 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'We'll Keep Running': Thousands Complete Final Mile Of Boston Marathon

Erin Roy, left, comforts Elise Wulff as runners cross the finish line after completing the final mile of the Boston Marathon course during "#onerun" in Boston, Massachusetts, on Saturday.
Dominick Reuter Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 1:24 pm

It was cold and rainy today in Boston. Still, thousands of runners laced up their shoes and headed to Kenmore Square.

That's the site of the final mile marker for the Boston Marathon. On April 15, when two bombs exploded near the finish line, thousands of runners could not finish the most illustrious road race in the world.

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The Salt
1:54 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Girl, 9, told McDonald's CEO: Stop tricking kids

Hannah Robertson, 9, and her mom, blogger Kia Robertson — with the makings for kale chips, of course.
Jamie Robertson Courtesy Jamie Robertson

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:28 am

It's not every day that a 9-year-old girl chastises the CEO of one of the world's biggest fast-food chains.

Yet that's exactly what young Hannah Robertson did Thursday morning at McDonald's annual shareholders meeting in Chicago. When the meeting opened up to questions, Hannah was first up at the mic with a pointed criticism.

"It would be nice if you stopped trying to trick kids into wanting to eat your food all the time," she told McDonald's CEO Don Thompson.

Ouch.

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The Two-Way
11:34 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Obama To Limit Drone Strikes, Renew Effort To Close Guantanamo

President Obama speaks about his administration's drone and counterterrorism policies at the National Defense University on Thursday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 4:03 pm

President Obama on Thursday unveiled a major pivot in White House counterterrorism policy, calling for a limiting of CIA drones strikes and for a renewed effort to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Thu May 23, 2013

3-D printer makes life-saving splint for baby boy's airway

Kaiba Gionfriddo, who breathes with help from a splint created by a 3-D printer, plays with his family dog, Bandit, at his Youngstown, Ohio, home.
Mark Stahl AP

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 10:53 am

A 3-D printer is being credited with helping to save an Ohio baby's life, after doctors "printed" a tube to support a weak airway that caused him to stop breathing. The innovative procedure has allowed Kaiba Gionfriddo, of Youngstown, Ohio, to stay off a ventilator for more than a year.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Amid Nails And Mud, Oklahoma Neighborhood Pulls Together

Homes in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla., were splintered by the tornado that swept through the area Monday.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 7:24 am

Brian Hock was standing Wednesday evening in what used to be his home but is now 2,000 square feet of nothing. Still resting in a bag of dog food was the cup he uses to scoop kibble, emblazoned with the slogan "Fear not: God's love shines bright."

Hock was at work Monday when the tornado smashed his house in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla. He says his daughters survived only because neighbors invited them to share a custom shelter.

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Shots - Health News
8:24 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Scientific Tooth Fairies Investigate Neanderthal Breast-Feeding

This model of a molar shows color-coded barium banding patterns that reveal weaning age.
Ian Harrowell, Christine Austin, Manish Arora Harvard School of Public Health

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 9:54 am

When it comes to weaning, humans are weird.

Our closest relatives, chimpanzees and gorillas, breast-feed their offspring for several years. Some baby orangutans nurse until they are 7 years old.

But modern humans wean much earlier. In preindustrial societies, babies stop nursing after about two years. Which raises the question: How did we get that way? When did we make the evolutionary shift from apelike parenting to the short breast-feeding period of humans?

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

Teachers in Oklahoma gather for 'sharing and healing'

Stacy Montgomery, pre-K teacher from Briarwood Elementary, grieves with fellow teachers at the informational meeting for Moore ISD teachers and administration.
Katie Hayes Luke NPR

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:06 am

What was billed as an informational meeting for teachers turned into a session of sharing and healing.

"A lot of people in this district will need grief counseling, including myself," said Susan Pierce, the superintendent of public schools in Moore, Okla.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

London attack deemed likely terrorist incident

Police and forensic officers near the scene of Wednesday's brutal attack.
Alastair Grant Associated Press

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 4:20 pm

A man has been killed in what reports described as a machete attack in London, and police have shot two suspects in what British Prime Minister David Cameron says is likely a terrorist incident.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

GIF talk: Do you say it with a G or a J?

Steve Wilhite, inventor of the GIF file, was given a lifetime achievement award at the 17th annual Webby Awards Tuesday night in New York City. Don't congratulate him the wrong way: To him, GIF sounds like Jif.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images for The Webby Awards

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 12:41 pm

The kerfuffle Tuesday and today on Twitter about the "news" that the creator of the GIF gets annoyed if he hears someone use a hard "G" when pronouncing the name of his file format triggered our aging memory banks.

Hadn't we heard a while back that GIF creator Steve Wilhite and many other tech types insist it's supposed to be pronounced with a soft "J," like Jif peanut butter?

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Planet Money
11:58 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Go East, Young Marijuana Dealer

David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 3:40 pm

Chuck used to sell marijuana in California. But the legalization of medical marijuana in the state meant he was suddenly competing against hundreds of marijuana dispensaries. So he moved to New York, where marijuana is still 100 percent illegal. Since making the move, he says, he's quadrupled his income. (For the record: His name isn't really Chuck.)

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Research News
9:45 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Quantum or not, new supercomputer is certainly something else

Google and NASA are betting that quantum forces are at work inside D-Wave's 512-bit chip.
Courtesy of D-Wave

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 8:33 am

It's exactly the sort of futuristic thinking you'd expect from Google and NASA: Late last week, the organizations announced a partnership to build a Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab at NASA's Ames Research Center.

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Why Oklahomans Don't Like Basements

A heavily damaged home in Moore on Monday. Chances are, it doesn't have a basement.
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 5:39 pm

When Randy Keller moved from Texas to the Oklahoma City area seven years ago, he couldn't find the house he was looking for.

"I was moving from Texas, where there are also a lot of tornadoes," says the professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Oklahoma who experienced the 1970 tornado in Lubbock, Texas. "But I just couldn't find one."

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