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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Obama Seeks $3.7B To Handle Immigration Crisis

Detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville, Texas, on June 18. The White House on Tuesday sought $3.7 billion to deal with the immigration crisis at the border.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 1:12 pm

Update at 3:33 p.m. ET

The White House said it's asking Congress for $3.7 billion to address the humanitarian crisis along the border with Mexico.

The statement said the funds would cover domestic enforcement, repatriation and reintegration of migrants, transportation costs, additional immigration judges, prosecutors and litigation attorneys to "ensure cases are processed fairly and as quickly as possible."

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Shots - Health News
10:32 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Smallpox Virus Found In Unsecured NIH Lab

Not something you'd want to find: Smallpox viruses infect a cell.
Science Source

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:10 am

Scientists cleaning out an old laboratory on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Md., last week came across a startling discovery: vials labeled "variola" — in other words, smallpox.

Under international convention, there are supposed to be only two stashes of this deadly virus: one at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and another at a similar facility in Russia.

The CDC swooped in to collect the vials and carted them off to a secure lab at its Atlanta headquarters.

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Police Use Dog To Find Memory And Hard Drives In Search

In June, the 167th Patrol Dog Class graduated from their canine narcotics and electronic media detection training, held by the Connecticut State Police Canine Unit. At far left is Thoreau, who now helps police in Rhode Island find computer hard drives.
Daniel Owen Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 11:18 am

Police in Rhode Island have a secret weapon to fight child pornography: a 2-year-old Labrador named Thoreau, who's been trained to sniff out computer hard drives. The dog is credited with finding a thumb drive that was hidden deep inside a metal cabinet last month.

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Shots - Health News
9:45 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Stress Causes Health Problems, Which Then Cause More Stress

Staci Moritz and her son Aidan, 11, play at a park in their neighborhood in Portland, Ore. Caring for three children and her injured husband exacerbated her health problems.
Beth Nakamura for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:38 am

Stress is bad for your health. And bad health causes a lot of stress.

Poor health and disability are common among people who say they suffer from a lot of stress, according to a national poll by NPR, in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

And it's not just those whose own health is poor. Serious illness and injury often impose enormous stress on entire families.

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NPR Ed
9:43 am
Tue July 8, 2014

How A Text Message Could Revolutionize Student Aid

Could students soon text their way to financial aid?
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:53 am

Every year, more than a million students don't complete the FAFSA — the main federal student-loan application.

One big reason? The form is so complicated that it discourages some people from even trying.

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Shots - Health News
9:41 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Complaint Says Insurance Plans Discriminate Against HIV Patients

HIV/AIDS drugs like AZT are lifesavers for many people. But insurers' policies on paying for the drugs vary widely.
Will & Deni McIntyre Science Source

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:12 am

Four Florida insurers allegedly discriminate against people with HIV/AIDS by structuring their prescription drug benefits so that patients are discouraged from enrolling, according to a complaint filed by health advocacy groups.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

The Secret History Behind The Science Of Stress

Camel marketed smoke breaks at work as time spent relaxing instead of stressing. Camel, 1964.
Stanford University

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 12:47 pm

The modern idea of stress began on a rooftop in Canada, with a handful of rats freezing in the winter wind.

This was 1936 and by that point the owner of the rats, an endocrinologist named Hans Selye, had become expert at making rats suffer for science.

"He would subject them to extreme temperatures, make them go hungry for long periods, or make them exercise a lot," the medical historian Mark Jackson says. "Then what he would do is kill the rats and look at their organs."

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All Tech Considered
3:22 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

We Asked, You Answered: Going To Extremes To Disconnect On Vacation

Our readers wrote in on how they tried to take a vacation from their smartphones.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 7:08 am

Summer is a great time to take a break from some of the stressors in our lives. For many of us, that stress is brought on by too much screen time and the pressure to stay connected.

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Recipes
3:20 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Whipping Up A Second Serving Of Atlantic Beach Pie

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:56 pm

In an encore installment of our Found Recipes series, cookbook writer Katie Workman talks about an amazing citrus and whipped cream pie called "Atlantic Beach Pie," which she had at Crook's Corner in North Carolina. Bill Smith, the restaurant's chef, also explains pie's origins.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Politics
3:19 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Maine, A Gay Candidate With An Uneven Record On LGBT Rights

Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud speaks at the Pride Parade and Festival in Portland, Maine, on June 21. Michaud, who is openly gay, is running for governor with the backing of national LGBT groups.
Susan Sharon NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:56 pm

Maine was among the first states to legalize same-sex marriage at the ballot box — and now, LGBT groups are hoping voters there will break new ground by electing the nation's first openly gay governor in November.

But Democratic candidate Mike Michaud only recently came out, and he hasn't always been a gay-rights supporter.

Responding to what he called a "whisper campaign" about his sexual orientation, the six-term congressman did something dramatic last November: He outed himself in a series of newspaper op-eds.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

More Than 50 People Were Shot In Chicago Over The Holiday Weekend

Police investigate the scene of a shooting at 75th Street and Stewart Avenue on Saturday in Chicago. At least 50 people were shot in the city, nine of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the Fourth of July weekend.
E. Jason Wambsgans MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 2:15 pm

At least 50 people were shot in Chicago, 12 of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the long Fourth of July holiday weekend.

The Chicago Tribune called it "the greatest burst of gun violence Chicago has seen this year."

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Bahrain Asks U.S. Diplomat To Leave Over Meeting With Shiite Group

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 2:12 pm

Bahrain's Foreign Ministry has said a top U.S. diplomat "is unwelcome and should immediately leave the country."

Assistant Secretary of State Tom Malinowski oversees democracy, human rights and labor issues. On Sunday, he met with Al Wifaq, a Shiite opposition group. Bahrain's Foreign Ministry said the meeting was "indicative of an approach which discriminates amongst the people of this one nation."

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Men In America
3:04 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Teen Tries To Be The Parent His Own Dad Never Was

Marvin Ramos, now 18, was overwhelmed when his daughter, Hailey, was born. But now he says he's determined to be the best father he can be. "I haven't run away," he says, "and I never want to."
Marvin Ramos Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:40 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Marvin Ramos found out he was going to be a father when his girlfriend, Stephanie, called him during a basketball game. He says he sat down on a bench and looked up at the sky. He was 16. Stephanie was 19.

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The Salt
1:41 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Couple Revives Lost Moroccan Fig Liquor, One Bottle At A Time

Bottles of mahia in the Nahmias et Fils distillery.
Alex Schmidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:56 pm

Before the crowds descend on the Whisky Jewbilee, a kosher alcohol tasting event in Manhattan, David and Dorit Nahmias stand behind their vendor table, getting psyched up.

"This is like the big game," Dorit Nahmias says.

Events like these are a key tool for getting the word out about their tiny distillery, and the Nahmiases attend half a dozen of them per year. The product they're trying to sell is one few people have heard of: mahia. Dorit rehearses her pitch:

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All Tech Considered
1:20 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

From Pen And Paper To 3-D, Look Who's Challenging Google Maps

A 3-D map of London by Nokia's mapping division, called Here.
Here

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:47 am

When it comes to creating a digital map of the world, you may think of Google workers driving around in high-tech cars mounted with cameras — snapping photos of everything.

But Robert Scott walks the streets of London jotting down address numbers with nothing more than a pen and a piece of paper.

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