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3:12 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day.
Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 2:29 pm

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

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The Salt
11:47 am
Sat August 17, 2013

How Many Cups Of Coffee Per Day Are Too Many?

A barista makes coffee using the pour-over method at Artifact Coffee in Baltimore.
NPR Benjamin Morris

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 8:40 am

That morning cup of Joe is a daily, practically sacred ritual for many of us.

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The Salt
2:18 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Fight Food Waste: Drink Rum, Matey

Captain Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, is said to have tucked slow-burning fuses into his beard and lit them on fire before plundering towns for gold and rum.
Hulton Archive Circa Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 8:40 am

The story of William McCoy sounds almost like a Prohibition-era version of Breaking Bad.

A mild-mannered shipbuilder, McCoy started smuggling booze along the Eastern seaboard during the early 1920s, only to become the top rum runner around.

He never touched his merchandise, never cut it with water, and shipped only the top-shelf liquors. In other words, he sold "the Real McCoy."

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Shots - Health News
2:17 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

After These Docs Saw The Farm, They Didn't Want The City

A little doctoring away from it all can grow on a person.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 7:31 am

Finding doctors to work in the countryside isn't easy.

About 20 percent the U.S. population lives in rural areas, but only about 11 percent of doctors practice there. The lure of cities and suburbs has been hard to overcome. And doctor shortages, already acute in some rural areas, are expected to get worse.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Hell With The Lid Off: Coffee Drinkers' Plight Exposed In Canada

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 12:38 pm

"Is this coffee, or is this Fight Club?" That's the question Bryan Hansen of Calgary, Canada, says he asked himself after his coffee lid betrayed him — yet again — leading him to fire off a letter of complaint to the Tim Hortons café chain, sending it to the attention of its "Lid Manager."

Hansen's fiercely funny note won fans on Reddit and elsewhere, as fellow customers stood up to say they, too, had been suffering in (scalded) silence because of the coffee and pastry stores' flip-top lids.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

So Baaad It's Good: 'Sheep Protest' Video

YouTube.com/haywiredigital

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:16 am

We won't get complicated. This is just a video that you might enjoy on another day when there's been plenty of heavy news.

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The Salt
9:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Eating On Mars? Be Sure To Pack The Tortillas

Mission to Mars: Six explorers lived in this simulated Mars habitat in Hawaii for four months, part of a NASA study to test the role of cooking and food on an extended space mission.
Sian Proctor NASA HI-SEAS

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:27 pm

After several months of freeze-dried food, even the most committed carnivores would probably reach for the fresh produce.

So it's no surprise that the six explorers who were cooped up studying space-friendly foods on a simulated mission to Mars for the past four months went right for the mangoes and pineapple during their first meal outside their habitat Aug. 13.

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Food
12:01 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt's Vice President Resigns As Death Toll Rises

Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi shout during clashes with Egyptian police at the Rabaah Al-Adawiya protest camp in Cairo's Nasr City district, Egypt, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:20 pm

A nationwide state of emergency has been declared in Egypt. The Egyptian government reports that more than 100 people have been killed across the country in clashes with the military.

Supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi are claiming that hundreds more died in Cairo alone when police moved in to clear camps where they had been protesting since Morsi’s removal by the military last month.

The interim Vice President, Mohammed ElBaradei has resigned in protest over the violence, and the Obama administration is urging Egypt’s military rulers to show restraint.

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The Salt
11:48 am
Wed August 14, 2013

How A Seed Saver Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 12:04 pm

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. Lately, we've been tickled by the cotton candy grape and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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Shots - Health News
9:34 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Doctors Look For A Way Off The Medical Hamster Wheel

The doctor is too tired to see you now.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:50 am

I became a doctor to help people.

When I was a medical student, I held the naive and idealistic belief that if I just did good work, the business side of things would somehow take care of itself.

How wrong I was.

Now I'm an internist taking care of all comers age 18 and up. Some days I find myself facing patients and feeling more like a harried airline clerk than a real doctor.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:33 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Is There A Giant Life Form Lurking In Our Solar System? Possibly, Say Scientists

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 8:29 am

What if — just maybe — we find extra-terrestrial life in the oceans of Europa, a little moon circling Jupiter? If we do, says writer Caspar Henderson, don't expect that oceanic alien to be very big. Or very scary. Or even very visible. Nothing like this ...

The "top predator" on Europa, Henderson reports, is likely to be "a fearsome creature with the mass of one gram." That's three one-hundredths of an ounce.

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The Salt
9:40 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Chipotle Is Keeping Its Meat Antibiotic-Free After All

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:26 pm

For a few hours Tuesday, it appeared that Chipotle Mexican Grill, an ever expanding source of fast food for the ethically conscious consumer, had softened its hard line against antibiotics in meat production.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Would Some Marriages Be Better If Couples Signed 'Wedleases'?

To have and hold, to sign on the bottom line?
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 2:56 pm

"People marry and divorce as if getting married is the equivalent of the high school concept of going steady," says Florida lawyer Paul Rampell.

Which is why, as Rampell said Tuesday on Tell Me More, he's pitching the idea of "wedleases."

That is:

"A combination of the words wedlock and lease. Two people commit themselves to a marriage, to a written contract for a period of years. One year. Five years. Ten years. Whatever term suits them.

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Shots - Health News
9:48 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Same-Sex Couples Seeking Insurance Wait For IRS Rules

Saying, "I do," may be easy part when it comes to health coverage.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 7:49 am

Now that the Supreme Court has ruled that the federal ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, federal agencies have to figure out the regulations that govern everything from immigration permission to income taxes.

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