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Planet Money
1:48 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

What's The Best Way To Tax Marijuana? It Depends On What You Want

Marijuana at a Denver dispensary.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:21 pm

A basic tenet of economics: Tax things you want less of. If you want people to, say, eat less candy, tax candy.

Economists, given that they are economists, have traditionally assumed that it doesn't matter when the tax is added to the price. Whether people see the tax reflected in the price of the candy when they grab it off the shelf, or whether the tax is added at the cash register, like sales tax, shouldn't make a difference.

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The Salt
1:47 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Why Slather This Spinach Field In Poop? It's All For Science

University of California, Davis food safety field scientists Michele Jay-Russell, Paula Kahn-Rivadeneira, Anna Zwieniecka, Navreen Pandher and Peiman Aminabadi celebrate the first day of their experiment testing E. coli survival in soil.
Courtesy of Fhon Saharuetai

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:06 pm

Why are these scientists in hazmat suits smiling? They're standing in a field that they are about to spread with raw manure — four different kinds of raw manure, to be exact.

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
1:47 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Walter Cronkite On The Assassination Of John F. Kennedy

CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite reports that President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.
CBS via Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:21 pm

The story of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy has been told many times by many people. Among those who told it first was the late Walter Cronkite. He anchored the CBS News coverage during the first hours after bullets hit the president in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, 50 years ago Friday.

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It's All Politics
1:46 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

5 Ways JFK Still Influences Presidential Politics

Then-Sen. John F. Kennedy showed some of the charisma that powered his presidential bid as he greeted college students in Charleston, W.Va., in April 1960.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 3:06 pm

The 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's death in Dallas is a time when much attention is aptly focused on the abrupt and tragic end to his presidency.

But it's also a moment to consider the beginning of JFK's presidential story, since he redefined the art of campaigning for the White House.

Here are five ways Kennedy's influence is still being felt in presidential politics:

1. The Self-Selected Candidate

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The Salt
9:25 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Thanksgivukkah: A Mash Of Two Holidays That's Easy To Relish

Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish is delicious over latkes.
Selena N.B.H. Flikr

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 11:35 am

It's that time of year again. Time for Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish. Every year since 1972, around Thanksgiving, I've shared my mother-in-law's famous cranberry relish recipe on the radio. It's appallingly pink, like Pepto Bismol — but it tastes terrific.

This year, I bring my relish recipe to Thanksgivukkah. Next week, Thanksgiving and the start of Hanukkah fall on the same day. It's a rare convergence.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Pakistani Who Helped Hunt Bin Laden Is Charged With Murder

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, in 2010, who has faced legal troubles since he took DNA samples that helped prove Osama bin Laden was in Abbottabad.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 10:42 am

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, who assisted U.S. intelligence agents trying to zero in on Osama bin Laden, has been charged with murder in a case stemming from a patient's death.

Afridi's lawyer, Samiullah Afridi, said he was informed about the charges Friday, and that a trial is scheduled for next month, Reuters reports.

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Shots - Health News
9:18 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Insomnia Could Raise Risk Of Heart Disease And Death In Men

There's more than one reason to aim for a good night's sleep.
Charles Taylor iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 11:49 am

There are lots of reasons to aim for a good night's sleep. Sleep helps us retain our memories. It helps our brains get rid of harmful toxins. But sleep might also play a role in heart disease.

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Code Switch
9:18 am
Fri November 22, 2013

If Twitter Existed In 1963: Follow Live Tweets From Nov. 22

Lady Bird Johnson (left), Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy sit during the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce Breakfast at the Hotel Texas.
JFK Library

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:18 pm

If you've been on Twitter the past couple of days, you might have stumbled upon tweets from @TodayIn1963. Since June, NPR's Code Switch blog has compiled moments from 1963 — a pivotal year in U.S. history — and is tweeting them as they happened then. The news — and @TodayIn1963 — will spin and spin as bits of history unfold in "real-time."

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Music Interviews
9:18 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Esperanza Spalding: Guantanamo Doesn't Represent 'Our America'

Grammy Award-winner Esperanza Spalding in her video 'We Are America."
ESPLLC

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:24 pm

Grammy Award-winning musician Esperanza Spalding has a problem with using the phrase "protest song" to describe her new recording, "We Are America." The song, along with its accompanying music video, demands congressional action to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

" 'Protest' doesn't seem accurate to me," she tells NPR's Celeste Headlee. "We weren't thinking of a 'protest' song, we're thinking of a 'let's get together and do something pro-active, creative and productive' song."

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
9:17 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Science Sees Its Own Reality In Life's Hall Of Mirrors

Swarms of locusts in Madagascar, or clouds of elementary particles, without sound, odor, flavor or color? Reality is harder to pin down than you first might think.
Bilal Tarabey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 8:46 am

The Bible says God created the heaven and earth. God made the great swarms of living creatures. God created us.

Science dismisses this story. It is a fairy tale. But science goes much farther. God is an illusion, yes. But so is the world we fancy that he created.

Swarms of living things? Human beings? Heaven and earth? None of this is real. Not really.

What there really is, for science, are only things made up of smaller things made up of smaller things made up of smaller things.

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Shots - Health News
8:02 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Mix Of Young And Old Signing Up For Health Care In California

Peter Lee, the executive director California's health insurance marketplace, says he's pleased by the number of young people already signing up.
Max Whittaker Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:15 am

In California, a state considered crucial to the success of the Affordable Care Act, older people are starting to enroll in the new health insurance marketplace in large numbers – as expected. But a demographic breakdown released Thursday of the early sign-ups suggests younger people are showing up in force, too.

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Prepare For Cabin Noise: FCC May End Ban On Phones During Flights

The new head of the Federal Communications Commission proposes allowing airline passengers to make phone calls during flights. Here, a passenger looks at her cellphone before a flight last month.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 5:59 pm

The Federal Communications Commission is proposing a change to allow travelers to make phone calls as they fly on jetliners in the U.S. The agency's new chairman, Tom Wheeler, calls the current ban on the use of cellphones during flights "outdated and restrictive."

Here's a statement from Wheeler that was released Thursday:

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It's All Politics
4:21 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Filibuster Changes Could Be Most Apparent In Federal Courts

On June 4, President Obama announces the nominations (from left) of Robert Wilkins, Cornelia Pillard and Patricia Ann Millet to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In the past three weeks, Senate Republicans have blocked confirmation votes on all three.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 3:57 pm

President Obama and all future presidents have a freer hand today to make both executive and judicial appointments.

The Senate's historic vote on Tuesday eliminates a rule that until modern times had been used infrequently, and not always fairly. That unfairness, said Democrats, increased to an intolerable level during the Obama administration. As Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., observed, since the Senate created the filibuster rule in 1917, there have been 168 filibusters of executive and judicial nominees — and half of them have taken place during the Obama years.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

It's Away! Cargo Jet That Landed At Wrong Airport Takes Off

Grounded: The Boeing 747 Dreamlifter that mistakenly landed Wednesday at Jabara airport in Wichita, Kan.
Jaime Green MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 3:54 pm

Update at 2:17 p.m. ET. In The Air:

Moments ago a massive Boeing 747 "Dreamlifter" cargo jet that mistakenly landed at a small municipal airport late Wednesday took off with a roar from an airfield with a runway much shorter than a jet that size usually uses.

We were watching an NBC News webcast as the big jet took off.

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It's All Politics
2:56 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

'Nuclear Option' Vote Marks Tectonic Shift In Senate Rules

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada (from left), Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Illinois defend the Senate Democrats' vote Thursday to weaken filibusters and make it harder for Republicans to block confirmation of the president's nominees for judges and other top posts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 4:15 pm

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's move Thursday to make possible the confirmation of presidential nominees with a simple majority marks a tectonic shift in the rules and folkways of the Senate.

Back in 2005, then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist called this idea "the constitutional option" when he came close to invoking it on behalf of the judicial nominees of President George W. Bush.

That sounded a lot more dignified than the name Frist's predecessor, Trent Lott, had used just two years earlier: "the nuclear option."

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