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Afghanistan
12:31 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Afghan Assembly Approves Security Plan, But Karzai Delays

Afghan President Hamid Karzai attends the Loya Jirga in Kabul on Sunday.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 10:50 am

A grand assembly of Afghan tribal elders and civil society leaders — the Loya Jirga — resoundingly approved an agreement to allow 3,000-9,000 U.S. troops to stay in the country after the NATO mission ends next year.

However, it remains unclear when — or if — President Hamid Karzai will sign the agreement.

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Around the Nation
12:31 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

More Kids Roll In Style In Tricked-Out, Giant Wagons

Brenda Lemus and her family tour the Los Angeles County Fair. They bought their wagon here, complete with canopy and storage space, six years ago.
Molly Callister for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 10:33 am

Outside the giant river otter exhibit at the Los Angeles Zoo, 5-year-old Emily checks out the sights while her baby sister lounges in a canopy-covered wagon.

The girls' aunt, Maggie Hathaway, is among a growing number of parents and caregivers who are rolling their kids around in wagons instead of strollers. "Sea World, or the fair — anywhere where ... the little one wants to lay down," she says.

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StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
12:30 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Remembering When A Teacher Had His Back

NPR's Mike Pesca (right) reminisces about his middle school days with former teacher Kevin Sheehan.
Courtesy Mike Pesca

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 10:50 am

Friday is the National Day of Listening, a chance to sit down with a loved one, turn on a tape recorder and ask that person about his or her life. NPR's Mike Pesca chose to talk with one of his middle school teachers about lessons they learned from each other.

You can find tips on how to record your conversation at nationaldayoflistening.org.

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StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
12:30 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Remembering When A Teacher Had His Back

NPR's Mike Pesca (right) reminisces about his middle school days with former teacher Kevin Sheehan.
Courtesy Mike Pesca

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 10:50 am

Friday is the National Day of Listening, a chance to sit down with a loved one, turn on a tape recorder and ask that person about his or her life. NPR's Mike Pesca chose to talk with one of his middle school teachers about lessons they learned from each other.

You can find tips on how to record your conversation at nationaldayoflistening.org.

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Author Interviews
12:30 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Thanksgiving Dinner Deja Vu? Try French Food This Year

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 10:50 am

As you're thinking about this year's Thanksgiving menu, you might be feeling a bit bored. Green bean casserole? Been there. Turkey and stuffing? Meh. Pumpkin pie? Cliché.

We were looking for a little Thanksgiving inspiration, so we reached out to culinary legend Patricia Wells. The veteran restaurant critic and cookbook author has been teaching French cooking for nearly two decades in Paris and Provence.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

China Expands Air Defense Zone Over Disputed Islands

Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail alongside Japanese activists' fishing boat, not in photo, warning the activists away from a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan.
Emily Wang AP

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:36 am

In a move that angered Japan, China expanded its air defense zone to include a group of uninhabited islands claimed by both countries.

The Chinese government released a map and coordinates on Saturday that show the zone covers most of the East China Sea, including the islands.

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Economy
12:28 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Many Americans Will Be Giving Thanks For Lower Prices

Gas prices are down compared with last year, but slumping consumer confidence could dampen Thanksgiving holiday travel.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 10:11 am

When Americans drive to their Thanksgiving gatherings this week, they will have one more blessing to count: lower costs.

Gasoline is cheaper than last year. Turkey prices are down, too. And retailers are joining in, offering big discounts on TVs and other goods.

For people who watch every penny, this Thanksgiving will be a good time for pinching.

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The Two-Way
9:25 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Contractors Invited To Bid On Destroying Syria's Chemical Arsenal

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:42 pm

Faced with a series of tight deadlines for ridding Syria of its chemical weapons, the international group running the effort is asking private chemical companies to submit bids for performing the work. The cost of the project would be capped at $54 million, and the contractors must be able to receive chemicals as early as February.

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Salt
3:20 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Ancient Wine Bar? Giant Jugs Of Vino Unearthed In 3,700-Year-Old Cellar

Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C.
Eric H. Cline Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 1:06 pm

It looks like our ancestors from the Bronze Age were way bigger lushes than we had ever realized.

Archaeologists have discovered a personal wine cellar in a palace that dates back to 1700 B.C. It's the oldest cellar known, and the personal stash was massive.

More than 500 gallons of wine were once stored in a room connected to the palace, located in modern-day northern Israel, scientists said Friday at a conference in Baltimore. That's enough vino to fill 3,000 wine bottles — or a seven-person hot tub.

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All Tech Considered
2:34 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Video Gaming, Bitcoin And Landlines

There's a growing market for digital currencies like Bitcoin. A Sydney pub, seen here, is taking Bitcoins as payment for drinks.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 9:05 am

Wow, suddenly we're at the end of the week already. If you missed the conversations about digital life and technology in the headlines and on NPR, here's a look back.

ICYMI

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Business
2:33 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

JPMorgan Says It Broke No Law. So Why Pay The $13 Billion?

The U.S. government says JPMorgan Chase & Co. knowingly sold faulty mortgage-backed securities in the years leading up to the financial crisis. The bank says it's broken no laws.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 10:20 pm

State and federal regulators have hailed Tuesday's $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase & Co. over faulty mortgage assets it sold in the years leading up to the financial crisis as a big victory for the judicial system.

But like other big settlements to emerge from the financial crisis, the deal leaves unclear just what the bank did wrong.

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Shots - Health News
2:28 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

More Children Are Being Medicated For ADHD Than Before

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:03 pm

The number of children being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is on the rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And families increasingly are opting for medications to treat kids. Two-thirds of children with a current diagnosis are being medicated — a jump of 28 percent from 2007 to 2011.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Rate Of Coastal Wetlands Loss Has Sped Up, U.S. Study Says

Saltwater wetlands that include marshes and shoals on Virginia's Atlantic coast. U.S. coastal wetlands losses were 25 percent greater from 2004-2009, according to a recent federal study.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:47 pm

The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to the latest data published by federal agencies. More than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico; nationwide, most of the loss was blamed on development that incurred on freshwater wetlands.

"The losses of these vital wetlands were 25 percent greater than during the previous six years," NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports for our Newscast unit. She also notes that the loss equals "about seven football fields every hour."

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The Salt
1:49 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

This Is What America's School Lunches Really Look Like

Courtesy of DoSomething.org

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 9:08 am

School lunch has never been the stuff of foodie dreams. I'm still haunted by the memory of my elementary school cafeteria's "brain pizza" – a lumpy oval thing topped with fleshy white strips of barely melted mozzarella that clumped together like neurons.

And it looks like America's school cafeterias are still turning out the culinary abominations, judging by the images on Fed Up, a fascinating online project showcasing school lunch photos submitted by students across the country.

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Shots - Health News
1:49 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Eye Makeup Used To Protect Children Can Poison Them Instead

A child wearing the traditional eyeliner kajal peeps from behind a door in Allahabad, India.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 10:30 am

Putting black makeup around a baby's eyes is a common tradition across India, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Some parents think the eyeliner protects the eyes or improves sight.

But two recent lead poisoning cases in New Mexico offer parents another reminder to be extra careful with cosmetics on children's faces.

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