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Shots - Health News
11:19 am
Wed August 21, 2013

An Alaska-Sized Price Difference For Circumcisions

Dr. Charles Ryan checks on a patient.
Annie Feidt

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 4:10 am

It's not just patients who are stunned to see what a hospital charges for services.

Two groups of pediatricians are taking a stand in Anchorage, Alaska, after learning that Alaska Regional Hospital is charging $2,110 for a circumcision — almost 10 times more than the $235 that Providence Hospital, the city's other major health facility, charges. Those prices are on top of a doctor's bill.

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Shots - Health News
11:18 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Brushing And Flossing Could Cut Risk Of Oral HPV Infection

Oral HPV infections are on the rise. Brushing and flossing well wouldn't hurt.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 1:19 pm

The human papillomavirus is a big cause of mouth and throat cancers, and those cancers have been getting more and more common.

So researchers asked: Could brushing and flossing make a difference?

It looks like the answer is yes, at least when it comes to being infected with oral HPV.

People with poor oral health are more likely to have an oral HPV infection, according to research from the the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

'Why This Compulsion To Run Long Distances?' A Runner's Beautiful Confession

From Racing the Antelope

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:50 am

Biologist Bernd Heinrich was in Zimbabwe, in the field, eyes down, looking for beetles, when for no particular reason he looked up and saw ... well, at first he wasn't sure what it was, so he stepped closer, leaned in, and there, painted on the underside of large protruding rock, were five human figures "running in one direction, from left to right across the rock face." They weren't very detailed, just "small, sticklike human figures in clear running stride" painted by a Bushman, two, maybe three thousand years ago.

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The Salt
10:37 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Forget Cronuts: London's 'Townies' Take On Hybrid-Dessert Craze

American baker Bea Vo, who runs Bea's of Bloomsburg, a string of bakeries in London, came up with this answer to the cronut: the townie, a tartlet-brownie with a gooey center and a crisp outer shell.
Courtesy Bea's of Bloomsburgy Helena Marie Fletcher

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:45 am

What's a baker to do when all foodies can talk about, on both sides of the Atlantic, is the cronut craze, a croissant-doughnut that NPR reported on earlier this year? Simple: Come up with an equally addictive hybrid dessert.

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The Record
8:24 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Marian McPartland, 'Piano Jazz' Host, Has Died

Marian McPartland.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 1:23 pm

Marian McPartland, who gave the world an intimate, insider's perspective on one of the most elusive topics in music — jazz improvisation — died of natural causes Tuesday night at her home in Long Island, N.Y. She was 95.

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Planet Money
10:20 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Pregnant? It's OK To Have A Glass Of Wine*

Pregnant.
Olivier Lantzendorffer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:21 pm

*According to an economist.

In her new book Expecting Better, economist and new mom Emily Oster parses the evidence behind all the recommendations given to pregnant women. She argues that, as an economist, she's trained to both examine evidence and think about trade-offs.

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Shots - Health News
2:07 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Study Finds No Link Between Hallucinogens And Mental Problems

Don't fear the 'shrooms.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 7:03 am

How risky are psychedelic drugs to mental health? Not nearly as much as you might have imagined.

People who had taken LSD, psilocybin (the brain-bending chemical in magic mushrooms) or mescaline at any time in their lives were no more likely than those who hadn't to wind up in mental health treatment or to have symptoms of mental illness, according to an analysis by some Norwegian researchers.

And there was some evidence that people who had taken the drugs at some point were less likely to have had recent mental health treatment.

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Music
9:40 am
Tue August 20, 2013

From Cuba To America, Arturo Sandoval Is An Ambassador For Jazz

Arturo Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie perform.
Concord Music Group

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:17 pm

Cuban-born trumpeter Arturo Sandoval is set to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom later this year for his contributions to the world of music. He's won nine Grammy awards and an Emmy. He's also collaborated with legends like Frank Sinatra and Johnny Mathis, and contemporary stars such as Justin Timberlake and Alicia Keys.

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All Tech Considered
9:36 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Facebook Makes Us Sadder And Less Satisfied, Study Finds

Researchers say Facebook use can lead to a decline in happiness and satisfaction.
Joerg Koch AP

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 7:17 am

Facebook's mission "to make the world more open and connected" is a familiar refrain among company leaders. But the latest research shows connecting 1.1 billion users around the world may come at a psychological cost.

A new University of Michigan study on college-aged adults finds that the more they used Facebook, the worse they felt. The study, published in the journal PLOS One, found Facebook use led to declines in moment-to-moment happiness and overall life satisfaction.

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The Salt
9:35 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

A child eats instant noodles on a train at the Harbin Railway Station in northeast China.
Wang Jianwei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 12:25 pm

Ask about the foods that have conquered the world and you're likely to hear about Coca-Cola and McDonald's Big Macs.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Albert Murray, Writer And Co-Founder Of Jazz At Lincoln Center, Dies

Writer, historian and critic Albert Murray in New York City in 2000.
Chris Felver Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 2:57 pm

Albert Murray, the influential writer and critic who helped found Jazz at Lincoln Center, died Sunday at home in Harlem. He was 97 years old. Duke Ellington once described him as the "unsquarest person I know."

For Murray, jazz and blues were more than just musical forms. They were a survival technique — an improvisatory response to hardship and uncertainty, as he told NPR in 1997: "You don't know how many bars you have, but however many of them you can make swing, the better off you are. That's about it."

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Shots - Health News
9:35 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Kids Involved in Bullying Grow Up To Be Poorer, Sicker Adults

It hurts now. And it hurts later, too.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:09 pm

Bullied children and kids who bully others have more health problems when they grow up than kids who aren't part of the bullying cycle, a study finds. They're also more likely to have financial problems, including difficulty keeping a job.

The findings run counter to a still-widespread notion that bullying is a childhood rite of passage with little lasting harm, the researchers say.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Lyme Disease Far More Common Than Previously Known

Black-legged ticks like this can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
CDC

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:58 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 300,000 Americans are getting Lyme disease every year, and the toll is growing.

"It confirms what we've thought for a long time: This is a large problem," Dr. Paul Mead tells Shots. "The bottom line is that by defining how big the problem is we make it easier for everyone to figure out what kind of resources we have to use to address it."

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The Salt
1:08 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Incredibly Shrinking Avocados: Why This Year's Fruit Are So Tiny

We found lots of avocados being sold six or 10 to a $1 bag in the San Francisco area. Some weighed less than 3 ounces.
Alastair Bland for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:40 am

What's thick-skinned and leathery, about the size of an egg, essential for guacamole and sold eight for a dollar?

No, not limes. Hass avocados. This year, anyway. These pear-sized fruits usually weigh half a pound or more. In the summer of 2013, though, hundreds of thousands of trees in Southern California are sagging with the tiniest Hass avocados in local memory — some just the size of a golf ball.

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Shots - Health News
11:25 am
Mon August 19, 2013

What's My Real Cancer Risk? When Online Calculators Don't Compute

Whether or not you'll someday get cancer or any disease can feel like a roll of hundreds of dice. Calculating the odds --€” and knowing what they mean --€” is tricky.
Katie Harbath Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:31 am

Online risk calculators are all the rage these days among public health groups trying to get us to change our unhealthful ways. The World Health Organization developed an online tool that lets you estimate your personal risk of cracking a hip in the next 10 years, for example. You just plug in data about yourself, your lifestyle, and your family medical history.

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