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The Salt
11:07 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Prince Charles: Organic Innovator, Biscuit Maker

The first product Duchy Originals launched was the Oaten Biscuit, and it's still a top seller today.
April Fulton for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:23 pm

Who knew Prince Charles started one of the first organic and locally sourced food companies in the world over 21 years ago?

Not us, until we got a pitch from his public relations outfit, inviting us to "entertain like the Royals" this holiday season with "Duchy Originals from Waitrose."

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Shots - Health News
11:06 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Movies Rated PG-13 Feature The Most Gun Violence

Gun violence has become increasingly common in PG-13 movies like The Avengers, released in 2012.
Zade Rosenthal AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:33 am

Parents who rely on movie ratings to decide what their children can watch may think that PG-13 films have fewer villains flashing guns than R-rated movies.

But they're wrong.

The PG-13 movies actually show more gun violence, a study finds.

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Around the Nation
6:46 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Merchant Marines See New Obstacles In Food Aid Proposal

The Port of Los Angeles is the busiest port in North American, and it's where many merchant mariners bid for jobs. But a proposed change to the U.S. food aid program could mean shipping out less food to developing countries, and fewer jobs.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:54 am

When it comes to shipping in the United States, there's a bit of a paradox. Even as U.S. exports have grown, the U.S. share of shipping has declined dramatically.

The traffic in and out of U.S. ports increases every year, but most of those ships fly foreign flags. In fact, the number of U.S. flagged ships is barely one quarter of what it was in the 1950s. That means fewer and fewer jobs for the men and women who work on those ships: the United States Merchant Marine.

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World
6:46 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Lighting Up The Investigative Path With Polonium-210

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat boards a helicopter in Ramallah, the West Bank, for the start of his journey to a hospital in France on Oct. 29, 2004. He died 2 weeks later.
Scott Nelson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 3:58 pm

With a Swiss forensics investigation pointing to polonium-210 as a possible cause of Yasser Arafat's death, the radioactive element is back in the news.

Confirming whether the Palestinian leader died from an assassination attempt will be difficult, given polonium's short half-life and the fact that Arafat has been dead nine years, science writer Deborah Blum says.

Whatever happened to Arafat, polonium does have a deadly history.

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The Salt
6:45 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Mallomars: The Cookie Everyone Likes To Hoard

Mallomars

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 8:24 am

Mallomars turn 100 years old this month. Over the years, the chocolatey marshmallow treat has gathered a cultlike following. For those who have yet to discover Mallomars, take heed — you may soon have a new addiction.

It's Mallomar season right now, which may seem strange since Mallomars are commercially packaged cookies, not apples. But the round graham crackers topped with marshmallow and covered in dark chocolate are actually packaged seasonally.

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The Two-Way
6:43 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Malala Yousafzai's Book Is Banned In Pakistani Private Schools

Malala Yousafzai's book, I Am Malala, has been banned in private schools across Pakistan.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:50 am

An organization representing 40,000 private schools in Pakistan says it has decided to ban I Am Malala, a memoir written by Malala Yousafzai, the teenager shot by the Taliban for promoting the education of girls.

The Associated Press spoke to Adeeb Javedani, president of the All Pakistan Private Schools Management Association, who said Malala was "representing the West, not us."

The AP adds:

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Shots - Health News
6:43 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Why Can't Ted Stay Out Of The Emergency Room?

A nurse's phone call at the right time can prevent a trip to the ER.
W. Steve Shepard Jr. iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:14 am

A 40-something patient I'll call Ted has a list of conditions that would have tongue-tied Carl Sagan. Even though I see Ted in my clinic every month, he still winds up visiting the emergency room 20 times per year.

Yes, 20.

Before he became my patient, he went even more frequently. So, the current situation, bad as it may be, represents halting progress.

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The Two-Way
10:37 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

'Ferrari Of Space' Crashing Back To Earth — Maybe Tomorrow

An artist's rendering of the European Space Agency's GOCE satellite, which is now out of fuel and expected to fall to Earth sometime Sunday or early Monday.
European Space Agency/AOES Medialab

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 3:47 pm

Sometime Sunday or early Monday, a 2,425-pound satellite that ran out of fuel last month and began falling from its already low orbit will plunge back to Earth.

The European Space Agency's Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) — so sleek that it was nicknamed "the Ferrari of space" during its mission mapping Earth's gravitational field — is expected to break into hundreds of pieces as it falls through Earth's atmosphere, with a few dozen fragments big enough to make it to the planet's surface or (more likely) its oceans.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

WATCH: Olympic Torch Makes Its First Space Walk

Video streamed by NASA showed Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazanskiy carrying the unlit Olympic torch, bobbing weightlessly at the end of a tether in a darkness dotted by stars.
AP

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 12:24 pm

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U.S.
4:31 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

A wheelchair is among debris from Superstorm Sandy in the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 13, 2012. A judge ruled Thursday that the city does not have adequate plans for evacuating people with disabilities.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 2:00 pm

A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country.

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The Two-Way
4:31 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Survey Finds Anti-Semitism 'On The Rise' In Europe

A counterprotester lifts a homemade sign during a demonstration of the nationalist party in downtown Budapest, Hungary, on May 4.
Attila Kisbenedek AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 5:17 pm

Two-thirds of Jews surveyed in a European Union study believe that anti-Semitism is "a problem" where they live and three-quarters said they believed that anti-Jewish attitudes had increased in recent years.

The EU's Fundamental Rights Agency sampled opinion from 5,847 Jewish people in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the United Kingdom — which collectively are home to 90 percent of Europe's Jews.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

With House OK, Hawaii Poised To Legalize Gay Marriage

Proponents of gay marriage rally outside House chambers at the Hawaii Capitol in Honolulu on Friday.
Oskar Garcia AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:36 am

Hawaii is poised to join 14 other states that have approved same-sex marriage.

Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie has indicated he will sign the bill, which was just approved by the House. If you remember, the Illinois state legislature took the same move last week. So depending on when the bills are signed into law, Hawaii will become either the 15th or 16th state to allow same-sex marriage.

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The New And The Next
4:30 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Digging Into The Truth About Messages, Images And Hard Times

Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 2:24 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, he tells NPR's Arun Rath about a televangelist on the rise in Singapore, a blog that takes a deeper look at viral news photography and the most surprising trend of the Great Recession.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Judge OKs Lawsuit That Could Change NCAA Amateurism Concept

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:51 pm

A federal judge on Friday issued a ruling that may cause a "fundamental change in scholarship rules and the concept of amateurism" in NCAA basketball and football, USA Today reports.

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Book Reviews
4:29 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Amy Tan's Latest: Mothers, Daughters And The Oldest Profession

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:10 pm

Family secrets, life-changing betrayals and the paradox of wondering about the old country while belonging to the new are at the heart of Amy Tan's work. She enthralled readers of her phenomenally successful first novel, The Joy Luck Club (1989), with the interlocking stories of four Chinese-born mothers and their four California-born daughters. Tan followed up with equally enduring portraits of fierce immigrant mothers who withheld secrets of the past while pushing their daughters forward in The Kitchen God's Wife (1991), and The Bonesetter's Daughter (2001).

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