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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Are Scientists Naive About Politics?

We face real-world decisions now about everything from sea level rise, to energy infrastructure to what food is best for you.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:21 am

Climate change is not the only place scientists and politicians get in trouble with each other. Energy policy, endangered species, stem cells, heck, even defining what constitutes a healthy diet can cause tension between the domains of policy and the domains of research.

Scientists say they just want to stick to the data and politicians say the world isn't that simple. So, who is right and who is really being simplistic about the way the world works?

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Shots - Health News
5:25 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Reach Survivors Of Typhoon Haiyan

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:08 am

Aid agencies are scrambling to try to get water and food to people in the Philippines who've been left homeless or injured by Typhoon Haiyan.

But reaching some of the areas ravaged by the intense storm is proving difficult. Even when aid can make it onto the islands, it's still not clear what supplies are needed the most.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

International Court Resolves Border Dispute In Cambodia's Favor

A Cambodian soldier looks across at the Thai border from the ancient Preah Vihear temple complex in Feb. 2011.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:08 pm

The International Court of Justice in the Hague has ruled that a disputed promontory that surrounds a 1,000-year-old Hindu temple belongs to Cambodia and said forces from neighboring Thailand should pack up and leave.

The conflict over the 2.8-mile Preah Vihear promontory has led to several skirmishes and exchanges of artillery fire between Thai and Cambodian forces in recent years.

In 1962, the same court ruled that the temple complex was on Cambodian soil but left open the question of exactly where the border around it should be drawn.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Could One Word Unite The World?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:49 pm

The word for milk in German is "Milch." In French it is "lait." Two quite different words — Milch, lait — for one thing. This is the basic observation that supports the linguistic principle that the relation between words and their meanings is arbitrary. You can't read the meaning off the word. And what a word means doesn't determine or shape the word itself. The bottom line: you need to learn words.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Record Number Of International Students Attend U.S. Colleges

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:22 pm

International students who come to the U.S. for college contribute more than $24 billion to the economy, according to an analysis that came out Monday. A record number of international students — nearly 820,000 — came to U.S. colleges in the 2012/2013 school year, says the Institute of International Education.

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Shots - Health News
3:52 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

First Estimate On Insurance Sign-Ups Is Pretty Darned Small

Mario Ricart , an insurance agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, talks with Naylie Villa about buying insurance under the Affordable Care Act on Nov. 5 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:53 am

The Obama administration later this week will issue much anticipated enrollment numbers for the first month of the Affordable Care Act.

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The Two-Way
2:49 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:03 pm

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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All Tech Considered
2:34 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Today's Online Sharing Companies Can Learn From Napster

Napster founder Shawn Fanning in February 2001, after a ruling that the free Internet-based service must stop allowing copyrighted material to be shared.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:02 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog and aggregated at this link, and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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Shots - Health News
2:33 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

$4.2 Billion Deal Highlights Drug Profits From Rare Diseases

Flemming Ornskov, CEO of Shire, says the company's offer for ViroPharma is part of a broader push into orphan drugs.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:14 am

Two drugmakers you may have never heard of just agreed to a big deal.

Ireland's Shire says it's paying $4.2 billion for ViroPharma, which makes a drug to treat a rare condition called hereditary angioedema. People with the inherited condition are prone to swelling that can be life-threatening. About 1 in 50,000 people have the genetic mutation that causes the problem.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Hundreds Attend Funeral Of WWII Veteran They Didn't Know

A cross adorned with a poppy was among the ways Harold Percival was remembered Monday. Poppies have been a symbol of remembrance for veterans since the poem In Flanders Fields was written in 1915 by a Canadian military doctor.
Nigel Roddis Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:15 am

Whether you know it as Veterans Day here in the U.S. or as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth countries, we think you'll agree that something remarkable happened on this Nov. 11 in England.

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Music Reviews
1:05 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Pop's Resident Provocateur Fizzles On 'ARTPOP'

Lady Gaga's new album, ARTPOP, is out now.
Inez and Vinoodh Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:54 pm

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Microphone Check
1:03 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Eight Million Stories: Hip-Hop In 1993

Faith Newman, Ralph McDaniels and Prince Paul at the Ace Hotel Sept. 25.
Ebru Yildiz for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 12:39 pm

All year Morning Edition and NPR Music have been running radio pieces about rap albums released 20 years ago, in 1993. For a special episode of Microphone Check we invited a group of people who were working in hip-hop back then to meet us at the Ace Hotel in New York City and tell stories about that productive and creative year. At the audio link you can hear an edited version of the evening.

Our guests were:

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All Tech Considered
11:29 am
Mon November 11, 2013

A Few Places Where Government Tech Procurement Works

Kansas City is one of the cities making technology a bigger priority in its procurement processes.
Brent Flanders Flickr

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 2:52 pm

The botched start of HealthCare.gov is just the latest big federal tech system to fail at launch, but information technology research group Standish found that during the last decade, 94 percent of the large-scale federal IT projects have been similarly unsuccessful.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Homeless Veteran's Makeover Goes Viral: VIDEO

Jim Wolf of Grand Rapids, Mich. The Army veteran was transformed for a video that the maker hopes will convince people to look at the homeless differently.
Screen grabs from the RobBlissCreative video

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:18 am

On this Veterans Day, a video showing a homeless veteran's transformation as a stylist cuts his hair, trims his beard and puts him in a new suit, is going viral. It's already drawn more than 10 million views in just 5 days.

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U.S.
11:10 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Forget The 50 States; The U.S. Is Really 11 Nations, Author Says

Colin Woodard's map of the "11 nations."
Colin Woodard

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:56 am

For hundreds of years, this nation has been known as the United States of America. But according to author and journalist Colin Woodard, the country is neither united, nor made up of 50 states. Woodward has studied American voting patterns, demographics and public opinion polls going back to the days of the first settlers, and says that his research shows America is really made up of 11 different nations.

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