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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Egypt Lifts 3-Month-Old State Of Emergency

Women supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted president Mohamed Morsi take part in a march through the streets of Cairo on November 8, 2013.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:44 am

Following a court decision Tuesday, Egypt has lifted a three-month-old state of emergency that was implemented following the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. The court ordered the state of emergency lifted two days before the government intended to do so.

Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper reports:

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Author Interviews
10:47 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Even When It Hurts 'ALOT,' Brosh Faces Life With Plenty Of 'Hyperbole'

You may recognize this drawing from Allie Brosh's popular "This Is Why I'll Never Be An Adult" blog post. (It's now a popular Internet meme.)
Courtesy Touchstone Books

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 1:21 pm

Allie Brosh's humorous, autobiographical blog, Hyperbole and a Half, has a huge following. In 2011, an editor of PC World included it in a list of the funniest sites on the Internet, and this year, Advertising Age included Brosh in its annual list of the year's most influential and creative thinkers and doers.

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Commentary
10:43 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Was Rand Paul's Plagiarism Dishonest Or A Breach Of Good Form?

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., talks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 3.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:31 pm

Even taken together, the charges didn't seem to amount to that big a deal — just a matter of quoting a few factual statements and a Wikipedia passage without attributing them. But as Rand Paul discovered, the word "plagiarism" can still rouse people to steaming indignation. Samuel Johnson called plagiarism the most reproachful of literary crimes, and the word itself began as the name of a real crime. In Roman law, a plagiarius was someone who abducted a child or a slave — it's from "plaga," the Latin word for a net or a snare.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Mexican Officials Say Former Texas Cop Led Kidnap Ring

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:46 pm

A man who served in the U.S. military and as a Texas police officer has been arrested near Monterrey, Mexico, where authorities say he led a kidnapping gang. The 32-year-old suspect is known by two names: Luis Ricardo Gonzalez Garcia and Javier Aguirre Cardenas, according to Mexican law enforcement officials. The 16-member gang is blamed for several violent crimes.

Officials say the suspect was traveling in a car in an upscale neighborhood on the edge of Monterrey last month when he was arrested. He was reportedly carrying a 9 mm handgun.

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Monkey See
10:31 am
Tue November 12, 2013

What He Did For Love: Manipulation And Wickedness In 'About Time'

Domhnall Gleeson plays Tim in About Time.
Murray Close Universal Pictures

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:17 am

[This piece contains some plot details about About Time, but nothing major that isn't revealed in the film's marketing.]

Movies are the closest thing we have to time travel, so it's no wonder — or rather, it's a rich and enduring wonder — that so many memorable films have made it their subject. Actually, let's strike that. Few if any of those films are actually about time travel. Most films that involve it use it as a means of discussing something else.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Tue November 12, 2013

New York's One World Trade Center Declared Tallest Building In U.S.

The world's tallest buildings by architectural top.
CTBUH

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:02 pm

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Justice Reaches Deal To Allow American, US Airways Merger

A US Airways plane rests near two American Airlines jets at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport last year. The combined carrier would be named American Airlines.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:57 am

The Justice Department has reached a deal that will allow for the merger of American and US Airways, opening the door to the creation of the world's largest airline.

The merger still needs final approval from a bankruptcy court.

The U.S. had hoped to block the merger arguing that it would result in less competition and higher prices for consumers.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan: How To Help

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food.
Tara Yap AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:55 am

The State Department announced Monday that it is "cooperating with the Philippines Typhoon Disaster Relief Fund established by The mGive Foundation, a U.S. nonprofit organization" to collect donations for victims of the typhoon that struck the Philippines on Friday.

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Microphone Check
10:27 am
Tue November 12, 2013

'All Daps And Hugs': G-Side Reunites And Releases A New Song

G-Side, reunited.
Matt McGinley

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:31 am

For about five years, we at NPR Music have been listening to G-Side, a rap duo from Huntsville, Ala., and the group's in-house production pair the Block Beattaz. Some of us rocked 2008's Starshipz & Rocketz until the tape popped, reveling in the sequined sound and mostly level-headed lyrics that alternate between the gruff and drawled deliveries favored by Clova and ST 2 Lettaz, respectively.

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Shots - Health News
10:27 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Despite Health Law, Uninsured Rely On Prevention Care Patchwork

Footprints mark the spot where immigrants stand while taking eye tests at the Salud Family Health Clinic in Ft. Collins, Colo. The nonprofit provides health care to immigrants seeking asylum and migrant farm workers.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:56 am

The federal health law gave a huge boost to insurance coverage for preventive care, mandating that nearly all health plans provide cancer screenings, checkups and, more controversially, contraceptives to people without an extra charge.

But those requirements won't help the 30 million or so people who are expected to remain uninsured despite the law. They will still lean on a patchwork of prevention services whose federal and state funding are anything but certain.

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The Salt
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Have Bitcoin To Burn? Next Stop Could Be The Farm

Economists say small-business owners — especially farmers dealing in high volume and low profit margins — are more likely to accept a volatile currency like Bitcoin than bigger businesses.
Allen Sheffield Flickr

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:54 am

For food producers who sell directly to consumers, credit cards are both a blessing and a curse.

They're a way to do business with cashless customers, but 3 percent of every credit card sale is usually charged to the farmer as a transaction fee. That adds up in a high-volume, low-profit business like agriculture.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Are Scientists Naive About Politics?

We face real-world decisions now about everything from sea level rise, to energy infrastructure to what food is best for you.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:21 am

Climate change is not the only place scientists and politicians get in trouble with each other. Energy policy, endangered species, stem cells, heck, even defining what constitutes a healthy diet can cause tension between the domains of policy and the domains of research.

Scientists say they just want to stick to the data and politicians say the world isn't that simple. So, who is right and who is really being simplistic about the way the world works?

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Shots - Health News
5:25 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Reach Survivors Of Typhoon Haiyan

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:08 am

Aid agencies are scrambling to try to get water and food to people in the Philippines who've been left homeless or injured by Typhoon Haiyan.

But reaching some of the areas ravaged by the intense storm is proving difficult. Even when aid can make it onto the islands, it's still not clear what supplies are needed the most.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

International Court Resolves Border Dispute In Cambodia's Favor

A Cambodian soldier looks across at the Thai border from the ancient Preah Vihear temple complex in Feb. 2011.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:08 pm

The International Court of Justice in the Hague has ruled that a disputed promontory that surrounds a 1,000-year-old Hindu temple belongs to Cambodia and said forces from neighboring Thailand should pack up and leave.

The conflict over the 2.8-mile Preah Vihear promontory has led to several skirmishes and exchanges of artillery fire between Thai and Cambodian forces in recent years.

In 1962, the same court ruled that the temple complex was on Cambodian soil but left open the question of exactly where the border around it should be drawn.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Could One Word Unite The World?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:49 pm

The word for milk in German is "Milch." In French it is "lait." Two quite different words — Milch, lait — for one thing. This is the basic observation that supports the linguistic principle that the relation between words and their meanings is arbitrary. You can't read the meaning off the word. And what a word means doesn't determine or shape the word itself. The bottom line: you need to learn words.

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