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1:20 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Martin Scorsese Takes Poland's Communist-Era Art Films On The Road

The hero of Andrzej Wajda's Ashes And Diamonds is torn between fighting Poland's post-World War II communist regime and returning to a normal, peaceful life.
Courtesy of Milestone Film

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 8:44 am

Martin Scorsese fell in love with Polish movies when he was in college.

"The images have stayed in my head for so many years, since the late '50s," he says. "I close my eyes, I see them, especially from Ashes And Diamonds, from The Saragossa Manuscript. They're very vivid, expressive, immediate."

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Shots - Health News
1:19 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Research Shows New Flu Viruses Often Arise In Domestic Animals

New research finds a close connection between the flu that devastated the horse population in North America in the 1870s and the avian flu of that period.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:17 am

As flu-watchers like to say, you can always count on influenza virus to surprise.

The latest revelation is that scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from. The dogma is that they always incubate in wild migratory birds, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.

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It's All Politics
3:06 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

GOP Struggles To Sell Message In Big Cities

Kevin Faulconer reaches for his wife, Katherine, at a Feb. 11 rally as their daughter looks up from below. Faulconer, a Republican, won the San Diego mayoral race last week.
Lenny Ignelzi AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 7:48 pm

San Diego voters did something highly unusual last Tuesday: They elected a Republican as mayor.

San Diego will now be the largest city in the country with a Republican mayor, Kevin Faulconer, who has been serving on its city council. The next largest is Indianapolis.

In fact, of the nation's 100 largest cities, a grand total of nine now have GOP mayors, plus two other Republicans who are nominally independent.

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Three Books...
3:05 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Muses And More: 3 Books We Owe To Writers' Lovers

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:43 pm

Many writers used their romantic partners as inspiration for characters and plot lines: Tolstoy's courtship of his wife, Sophia, became the model for Levin's wooing of Kitty in Anna Karenina, while Gustave Flaubert shamelessly infused intimate details about his mistress into the titular Madame Bovary. But some scribes owe much more to their significant others. These career-defining books might never have graced our shelves if it weren't for writers' strong-willed other halves.

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

Adolf Hitler salutes to a crowd of soldiers at a Nazi rally in 1938. Years later, in the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

In the fall of 1944, the United States and its allies launched a secret mission code-named Operation Paperclip. The aim was to find and preserve German weapons, including biological and chemical agents, but American scientific intelligence officers quickly realized the weapons themselves were not enough.

They decided the United States needed to bring the Nazi scientists themselves to the U.S. Thus began a mission to recruit top Nazi doctors, physicists and chemists — including Wernher von Braun, who went on to design the rockets that took man to the moon.

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Code Switch
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Drive For Diversity, NASCAR's Commitment To Race

Darrell Wallace Jr., a graduate of NASCAR's Drive for Diversity Program, celebrates after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Kroger 200 at Martinsville Speedway on Oct. 26 in Martinsville, Va.
Robert Laberge NASCAR via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

On Sunday, the K&N Pro Series East begins down in New Smyrna Beach, Fla. And if the track and pit look a little more diverse than they have in the past, that's in part because of a NASCAR program designed to entice different communities to try out the sport.

Market research says NASCAR's bread-and-butter fan base is about 60 percent male and 80 percent white, mostly from the Southern and Midwestern states. But as the country continues to become even more diverse, the sport is working to make sure its fan base is, too.

That's a challenge.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Fugitive Finally Captured: 'The Eyes Gave Her Away'

Under the name Marie Walsh, Susan LeFevre was on the lam from a Michigan prison for 32 years before being re-arrested in 2008 — also in San Diego.
AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

Earlier this winter, Lt. Charles Levens from the Michigan Department of Corrections was stuck at work.

"Well, that day was a bad snow day," he says. "We were not working too much in the field. The roads were horrible, the temperatures were below zero and it was a good day to work on some cold cases."

Cooped up in his office, he pulled out an old file on a woman named Judy Lynn Hayman. She was an escapee who broke out of a Michigan prison in 1977.

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Music Interviews
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

A Man, A Plan, A Concept Album About Panama

On the new album Panama 500, pianist Danilo Pérez considers five centuries of his home country's history.
Raj Naik and Luke Severn Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

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The New And The Next
2:33 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Super-Secure, Temporary Texts Draw Interest Of Business Crowd

Image Source

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:00 am

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about a new texting service that promises tight security. While Snapchat has become a popular way to text photos that disappear after a number of seconds, recent hacks have raised questions about its security. A service called Privatext provides an alternative that has gained interest among some professionals.

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The Salt
12:47 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Drink Vodka, Eat Pickles, Repeat: Mastering The Zakuski Spread

Zakuski tables, like Slava and Luba Frumkin's, are known for their largesse. This spread includes smoked salmon and halibut, pickled green tomatoes, salted mackerel, Herring Under a Fur Coat and Georgian eggplant rolls.
Deena Prichep

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 6:43 am

As you gather with friends to watch the Olympics this weekend, why not prepare what they might serve in Sochi? Try, say, herring instead of chips.

But if you're really presenting food the Russian way, you'll need to make more than one snack. And get your libations in order.

Zakuski are often described as Russia's answer to tapas — a little bite to have with your drink.

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Code Switch
12:47 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Love In Technicolor: Interracial Families On Television

In Parenthood, Dax Shepard plays Crosby, whose wife, Jasmine, is played by Joy Bryant. Their son is Jabbar (Tyree Brown).
NBC NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 4:04 pm

I Love Lucy was one of the most popular shows in the history of television. Its stars, redheaded Lucille Ball and her Cuban-American husband Desi Arnaz, became TV icons — but they almost didn't get on TV.

Kathleen Brady is the author of Lucille: The Life of Lucille Ball. She says the network that wanted Ball to star in her own sitcom was not interested in her husband.

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The Edge
12:46 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

U.S. Men's Ice Hockey Beats Russia In Preliminary Round

Russian President Vladimir Putin claps during the third period of a men's ice hockey game between the USA and Russia at the 2014 Winter Olympics, on Saturday in Sochi, Russia.
Petr David Josek AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:11 am

The U.S. Olympic ice hockey team beat Russia 3-2 on the ice at the Sochi Games in a heart-stopping sudden-death shootout.

Although only a preliminary round, the contest was reminiscent of the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Games when a group of American college players beat the formidable Soviet team in what became a touchstone of Cold War Olympic rivalry.

T.J. Oshie of the St. Louis Blues scored the game-winning point in the eighth round of the shootout that ended the clash among some of international hockey's best players.

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The Edge
12:46 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Soaking Sochi In Red And White, Canada Aims To Repeat 2010 Wins

Canada fans cheer during a men's hockey game between Austria and Canada at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, on Friday.
Harry E. Walker MCT/Landov

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 11:36 am

The wave just never stopped. The fans kept it going around Bolshoy Stadium at the Canada-Austria men's hockey match. Hands up, yell, sit, wait, repeat. Hands up, yell, sit, wait, repeat. As it moved, again and again, through the stands, the wave was strikingly red and white. A moving, yelling, living, breathing mass of Canadian pride.

It was Valentine's Day in Sochi. And the Canadians were in love — with their hockey teams, which are doing well, and with so many other athletes from their country. Canada is having a great run in Sochi, and its fans here are celebrating.

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Simon Says
12:45 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Shirley Temple's Films Still Charm After All These Years

Shirley Temple started performing in films when she was just 3 years old.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 7:47 pm

Shirley Temple really could be as effervescent as a jolt of ginger ale and as cheery as a maraschino cherry in the kid's cocktail that is still ordered by her name. When Shirley Temple Black, the name she used after her marriage to Charles Black, laughed — and she liked to laugh — tears came to her eyes.

She told us how once she'd been called to jury duty, and learned the case involved erotic bondage.

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The Protojournalist
12:45 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

What We Might Learn From Snoring Weather Cats

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 3:11 pm

Sometimes it feels like all the fancy meteorological machinery and prognostication equipment is actually working. And that the weather folks may finally be able to predict — albeit with constant updates and countless hedge words — what the weather is going to be.

At least for the next day or so.

But is that good enough?

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