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The Sunday Conversation
12:43 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Attorney For Young Victims Helps Families In Search Of Justice

Assistant United States Attorney Cynthia Wright takes on cases no one else wants to hear about: crimes against children. She sees herself as an advocate for those who can't speak for themselves and a support for their families.
The Washington Post The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 8:30 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

In the more than 20 years that she's been a prosecutor for the District of Columbia, Cynthia Wright has had one of the most agonizing jobs imaginable: prosecuting the perpetrators of crimes against young children.

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Monkey See
12:43 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Oscar Spoiler Alert: What We Already Know About The Winners

Actress Lupita Nyong'o may very well win an Oscar Sunday night. And if she does, she will have gotten votes from people who can't be bothered to learn her name.
Gabriel Olsen Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:38 am

Sunday night's Oscars will include a Best Picture race that's apparently narrowed to three films: 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and maybe American Hustle. Matthew McConaughey for Best Actor? Maybe. Or Leonardo DiCaprio? What about Cate Blanchett, a seeming shoo-in despite Meryl Streep delivering, in August Osage County, the biggest, chewiest, most Oscar-friendly performance of all time?

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Code Switch
12:43 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Latin Pride Swells For Mystery Model Behind Oscar Statuette

Hollywood legend has it the Oscar statuette was modeled after Mexican actor and director Emilio Fernandez.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 5:23 pm

The 8-pound, 24-carat-gold-plated statuette that will be handed out at the Academy Awards Sunday night is said to be modeled after a real man.

That man's name is not Oscar.

It might be Emilio, Emilio "El Indio" Fernandez. He was a famous Mexican director and actor who used to live in Hollywood in the 1920s. His nickname, "The Indian," came from the Kickapoo side of his family.

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All Tech Considered
12:42 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

E-Sports Reach Pro-Athletic Status, Fandom — And Money

As more money flows into the competitions, E-sports gamers are gaining legitimacy as professional athletes with honed skills.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 8:30 am

Online competitive gaming is increasingly mirroring the world of professional sports. E-sports are attracting hard-working teams that compete for millions of dollars in prize money.

Generally, gamers wage battles with one another using rapid clicks of a computer mouse. "A lot of it comes down to reflexes, but a lot of [it] is strategy," says David Gorman, a sportscaster for the popular e-sport, Dota 2. "It's very much like chess, except it's in real time. Almost like speed chess."

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The New And The Next
12:42 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

An Answer For Issues With 'Lavatory Logistics' At Outdoor Events

The app AirPnP seeks to provide an alternative to porta-potties and public urination at Mardi Gras.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 4:08 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with Arun Rath about an app that's bringing the community hospitality model to the bathroom. They also talk about a project that's made reading a full-body experience and sparked a conversation about the future of books.

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

China Blames Muslim Separatists For Deadly Knife Attack

The scene of a deadly knife attack at the railway station in Kunming in southwest China's Yunnan province on Saturday.
Sui Shui EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 11:10 am

This post was updated at 2:10 p.m. ET.

A bizarre mass stabbing at a southern China rail station on Saturday that killed at least 29 people and wounded 143 others is being blamed on Muslim separatists.

As we reported on Saturday, the 10 knife-wielding assailants randomly stabbed people at the Kunming Railway Station in Yunnan province.

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All Tech Considered
12:40 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Banished Is Like SimCity Without The City (But With Cholera)

In Banished, you build gentle hamlets of wooden and stone houses. That's a contrast to the bustling urban centers of many city-building sim games, but the pace is no less hectic.
ShiningRockSoftware

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 1:53 pm

This is part of our weekly 'Indie Watch' series of game reviews. Check here on Sundays for more posts in the series.

"Get busy living, or get busy dying."

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Is It Too Late For Ukraine To Take Back Crimea?

A Russian naval landing vessel enters one of the bays of Sevastopol, Crimea, on Sunday.
Andrew Lubimov AP

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 12:27 pm

This post was updated at 1:20 p.m. ET.

Russian forces appear to be digging in after seizing key assets in the Ukrainian republic of Crimea, and despite tough talk from Kiev's new leaders, the former Soviet satellite's under-manned and under-equipped military is no match for Moscow's battle-tested troops, experts say.

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Media
11:53 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Haven't I Seen You Before? Why News Reports Quote The Same People

Who ya gonna call?
Chagin iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 3:01 am

Al Cross has been all over the news lately.

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Bertha Blues
11:26 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Sand Grinds World's Largest Tunneling Machine To A Halt

The Seattle tunneling machine known as Bertha, which started its task in July, is now stuck 60 feet underground.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:03 am

Contractors working for the state of Washington are planning a high-stakes operation to rescue Bertha — the world's largest tunneling machine.

Bertha is supposed to be boring a 2-mile highway tunnel under downtown Seattle, but it got stuck in December.

Bertha is on Seattle's waterfront, between South Main and South Jackson streets, about 60 feet straight down. At first, they thought the machine was being stymied by a big glacial rock. Then attention focused on the chewed-up remains of a metal pipe. But now it seems Bertha's ailment is mechanical.

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Author Interviews
11:26 am
Sat March 1, 2014

If Anyone Can Make Golf Exciting, It'd Be Dan Jenkins

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:03 am

Dan Jenkins has covered sporting events around the world, from golf to football to skiing, from Pebble Beach to Green Bay to Gstaad, in pungent prose with a Texas kick — and in the process, he's become more famous than a lot of the athletes he was writing about.

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Music News
11:25 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Playing To The Rafters, Singing Like A Man Possessed

Possessed by Paul James is the performing title of Konrad Wert, a country-folk artist from Austin, Texas.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:03 am

Konrad Wert is a teacher by day, but when he plays his country-folk songs for fans in his home of Austin, Texas and elsewhere, he goes by the moniker Possessed By Paul James. In truth, "Paul James" is a fiction, a combination of the names of Wert's father and grandfather. Those who have seen him perform, however, would agree he seems possessed by something.

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Fresh Air Weekend
11:25 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: The Cosmos, Harold Ramis, And Protecting Your Data Online

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts a new TV series called Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey. It's an update of the influential 1980 PBS series Cosmos: A Personal Journey, hosted by Carl Sagan.
Patrick Eccelsine Fox

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:55 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Author Interviews
11:24 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Cheever Biographer Turns His Eye On His Own Troubled Family

Blake Bailey has written biographies of John Cheever, Richard Yates and Charles Jackson.
Mary Brinkmeyer

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:03 am

Blake Bailey is best known for his prize-winning biographies of great writers who were also destructive — and not just self-destructive — people. His books on John Cheever, Richard Yates, and Charles Jackson have been sympathetic, but unsparing.

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Movie Interviews
11:24 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Elaine Stritch, Volatile And Vulnerable In 'Shoot Me'

Fists balled and feet planted, cabaret legend Elaine Stritch powers through a song with her longtime music director, Rob Bowman, in a scene from Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me.
Isotope Films

Originally published on Sat March 1, 2014 8:03 am

Elaine Stritch is the lioness in winter. She's 89 and still performs ocassionally, after eight decades on Broadway and the West End. Sir Noel Coward reworked his musical, Sail Away, to give her all the best songs. She stopped Stephen Sondheim's Company in the middle of the show when she sang "The Ladies Who Lunch," which has become her signature song.

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