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Shots - Health News
1:39 pm
Sun March 9, 2014

Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions

Scientists have long sought a way to detect Alzheimer's before symptoms appear.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 6:59 am

An experimental blood test can identify people in their 70s who are likely to develop Alzheimer's disease within two or three years. The test is accurate more than 90 percent of the time, scientists reported Sunday in Nature Medicine.

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Sun March 9, 2014

Detroit's William Clay Ford Dies At Age 88

William Clay Ford, seen here in 1995 on a 1903 Ford Model A, has died at age 88. He posed for a photo with Edsel Ford II (left) and his son, William Clay Ford Jr.
Ford Motor Co.

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:01 pm

William Clay Ford, a descendant of auto industry pioneer Henry Ford and owner of the Detroit Lions, has died at age 88. He was the son of Edsel Ford.

Ford's death was confirmed by the automaker that bears his family's name Sunday. The company said Ford died at home after suffering from pneumonia. And it said that during his 57 years with the company, Ford led the Design Committee and helped develop cars such as the Continental Mark II, a sleek two-door built in the mid-1950s.

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The Salt
1:38 pm
Sun March 9, 2014

A Theme Park For Foodies? Italians Say Bologna

Customers dine at the original Eataly in Turin, Italy, which opened in 2007.
demoshelsinki/Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:53 am

Italy has more UNESCO world heritage sites than any other country in the world, and its art and cultural riches have drawn visitors for centuries.

It also prides itself on being a culinary mecca, where preparing, cooking and serving meals is a fine, even sacred, art. And now that the country is in the deepest and most protracted recession since World War II, why not cash in on its reputation as a paradise for visiting gourmets and gourmands?

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Around the Nation
7:35 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Catching Kayla: Running One Step Ahead Of Multiple Sclerosis

Eighteen-year-old Kayla Montgomery from Mount Tabor High School in Winston-Salem, N.C., was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis three years ago.
Phil Ponder

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 5:23 pm

When the starting gun sounds at Mount Tabor High School track meets, senior Kayla Montgomery from Winston-Salem, N.C., takes off.

The 18-year-old runner sets records, wins state titles, and next week, she's headed to nationals in New York.

But when Montgomery runs, her legs go totally numb. She has multiple sclerosis, a disease that causes nerve damage and interference in communication between her brain, spinal cord and legs.

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My Big Break
7:35 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

The Unforgettable Performance Ed Harris Doesn't Remember

Actor Ed Harris has been nominated for four Academy Awards.
Carlo Allegri Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 5:23 pm

As part of a new series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Actor Ed Harris, whose new film The Face of Love is out in select theaters, has taken on some indelible roles: from the controlling creator of the tiny universe in The Truman Show, to abstract expressionist painter Jackson Pollock.

But his most memorable acting experience came long before these Oscar-nominated performances.

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Music Interviews
7:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Putting A Name And Face To A Famous Voice

It's become the newest sports anthem: "The Man" by Aloe Blacc. The song is everywhere.
Reid Rolls Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 9:12 am

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Religion
7:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

A Frat Of Their Own: Muslims Create A New Space On Campus

The brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu come from a variety of backgrounds and religious upbringings. "We meet at this middle ground we call brotherhood," says ALM founder Ali Mahmoud.
Dylan Hollingsworth

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 5:23 pm

Toga parties and keg stands have become stereotypes of college fraternities. But Ali Mahmoud had something else in mind when he founded Alpha Lambda Mu, the first social Muslim fraternity in the country.

"I realized that there was this void for Muslims on campus," says Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas at Dallas.

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The New And The Next
7:33 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Die-Hard Disney Fans Band Together At The Happiest Place On Earth

The Main St. Elite is among the clubs that regularly meet up in Disneyland.
@ivan25ooze

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 5:23 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about a phenomenon emerging at the Disneyland. Packs of Disney fans have started meeting up at Disneyland with matching gear and group names — like The Neverlanders and Walt's Misfits. Disney gangs? Not quite. Many have started to incorporate elements of community service into their meetups.

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Movie Interviews
7:33 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

'Kids For Cash' Captures A Juvenile Justice Scandal From Two Sides

Kids for Cash chronicles the story of Judge Mark A. Chiavarella, who was convicted in 2011 for sending thousands of children to a juvenile detention facility from which he'd received a "finder's fee."
Courtesy of SenArt Films

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 5:23 pm

In 2009, a major corruption scandal dubbed "Kids for Cash" hit the juvenile justice system of northeast Pennsylvania.

Two local judges had been enforcing a zero-tolerance policy for bad behavior by kids. Even minor offenses, like fighting in school or underage drinking, could mean hard time in a juvenile detention facility.

Federal prosecutors alleged the judges were actually getting kickbacks from those private detention facilities. They said the judges kept the juvenile detention centers full, and received cash in return.

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The Two-Way
1:08 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Weeks Later, Epic Spelling Bee Ends In Missouri

Kush Sharma of Kansas City, Mo., is headed to the Scripps National Spelling Bee, after winning a spell-off Saturday. After his win, he posed with students and teachers from his school, the Frontier School of Innovation.
Maria Carter KCUR

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:53 am

It took more than 90 rounds and a delay of two weeks, after judges ran out of words. But Jackson County, Mo., finally has its spelling bee champion, after two stellar spellers broke a tie Saturday.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Malaysian Jetliner Has Been Missing For More Than 24 Hours; Search Goes On

Family members arrive at a hotel for loved ones of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines jet in Beijing Sunday. Search teams across Southeast Asia scrambled on Saturday to find a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 people on board that disappeared from air traffic control screens over waters between Malaysia and Vietnam.
Vincent Thian AP

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 5:40 am

This post continues to be updated.

An international search is underway for a Malaysia Airlines passenger jet that's been missing for more than 24 hours. Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 had 227 passengers and 12 crew members aboard when it took off from Kuala Lumpur early Saturday on a flight bound for Beijing.

A regular inspection of the missing Boeing 777-200 found no technical problems 10 days ago, reports China's state-run Xinhua news agency, citing a Malaysia Airlines spokesman.

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Interviews
11:33 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: WWII Filmmakers, Kevin Young And Solitary Confinement

Maj. Frank Capra sits at his War Department desk in Washington on March 6, 1942. Capra's non-War Department films include It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.
AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 7:10 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Music Interviews
11:05 am
Sat March 8, 2014

The Persistence Of Elbow

The men of Elbow, left to right: Richard Jupp, Mark Potter, Guy Garvey, Craig Potter, Pete Turner.
Tom Sheehan Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:31 am

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Movie Interviews
11:05 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Hollywood Bug Man Understands How Cockroaches Think

Entomologist Stephen Kutcher has wrangled insects for more than 100 films, commercials and music videos.
Courtesy of Stephen Kutcher

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 10:33 am

When most people see bugs on the big screen, they squirm, panic or squeal. But not Steven Kutcher. Kutcher is the man responsible for getting those insects on the screen. He's been Hollywood's go-to bug wrangler since the 1970s, handling, herding and otherwise directing insects in over 100 feature films.

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Ukraine: Military Standoffs And High Tensions Reported

Pro-Russian marchers (foreground) walk past pro-Ukrainian marchers gathered in Simferopol, capital of Ukraine's Crimea region, Saturday. Several hundred pro-Ukrainian protesters marched peacefully through the city center to a Ukrainian military base that's been blockaded by pro-Russian militants and soldiers.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:52 am

Members of pro-Russian forces and Ukraine's military have engaged in several tense standoffs in the largely autonomous region of Crimea, but they have also avoided violence in what's widely seen as a dangerous and uncertain situation. Diplomats are still working to find a possible solution.

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