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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

How An Aircraft Can Fall From The Sky Midflight

Brazil's navy sailors recover debris from Air France Flight 447 in the Atlantic Ocean on June 8, 2009. It took until 2012 to detail what happened in that crash.
AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 4:54 am

There's always a risk in flying, but the phase in which a plane is cruising at high altitude is widely considered to be safe. And that's what makes the mystery of what happened to Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 so confounding.

"Whatever happened happened quickly and resulted in a catastrophic departure from the air," Mark Rosenker, former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board who is now a consultant with CBS news, told NPR's Melissa Block.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Colorado Collected $2.1 Million In January Taxes On Recreational Pot

Marijuana is stored in bins for trimming and packaging in preparation to be sold retail at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:38 pm

For the first time since it legalized recreational marijuana, Colorado is releasing revenue figures: The state made $3.5 million in taxes and fees in January.

As KUSA-TV reports, $2.1 million of that came from the sale of recreational pot and $1.4 million came from medical marijuana.

KUSA adds:

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Seattle Moves To Curb Uber, Other Ride-Share Services

Seattle's government has given early approval to caps on ride-share companies such as Uber. Here, Peter Faris, whose company's drivers use Uber to find customers, holds a smartphone with the ride-sharing company's app in Washington, D.C.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:36 pm

Uber, Lyft, and similar companies that pair people who pay for a car ride with drivers who operate outside the traditional taxi system are facing new limits in Seattle, where the City Council's Taxi Committee recently voted to cap the number of "ride-share" drivers.

The full council had been scheduled to vote on a limit of 150 drivers per ride-share company today; the vote, which has sparked intense interest in the city, has been postponed until next Monday.

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Shots - Health News
2:25 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

As Health Law Takes Hold, Rate Of Uninsured Falls

A survey taken in early 2014 finds that the uninsured rate has declined. But differences by age remain.
Gallup

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 2:34 pm

Since the Affordable Care Act kicked in fully, the percentage of Americans without health coverage has fallen to its lowest point in five years.

In the last quarter of 2013, just before the federal health law took full effect, 17.1 percent of Americans reported they lacked health insurance, according to a Gallup survey.

When the survey was taken (between Jan. 2 and Feb. 28), the rate had dropped to 1.2 percentage points to 15.9 percent.

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Code Switch
2:23 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Our Conversation On Race In 'World of Warcraft,' Unabridged

The Pandaren are a fairly new race in WoW — "giant pandas that belong to clans with Chinese-sounding names and lands filled with 'Asian' architecture," as one person told us — and they show how real-world racial notions creep into the game's universe.
Battle.net

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 6:55 am

World of Warcraft is trying to reduce racial inequality. Don't worry, this isn't about racial disparities between black, Latino and Asian players — we're talking about gnomes and trolls and orcs here.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Sudanese 'Lost Boy' Returns To Search For Family

Mangok Bol, pictured here at Brandeis University, returned to his native Sudan to find his orphaned nieces and nephew. (Mike Lovett/Brandeis University)

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 12:01 pm

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power took time from the Ukraine crisis on Friday to speak to the U.N. Security Council about another critical issue: children in armed conflict.

Power talked about South Sudan, mentioning specifically Mangok Bol, a program administrator at Brandeis University.

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It's All Politics
2:19 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Governors' Races Offer Promise For Democrats

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett applauds a choir at The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center during a Jan. 29 news conference in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:49 am

Elections for governor could provide some good news for Democrats this fall, giving them the chance to regain ground in a few states where the party has had good fortune recently.

At this early stage, Republicans are expected to hold control of the House and pick up seats in the Senate — maybe even win a majority in the Senate.

But the GOP has fewer opportunities when it comes to statehouses. Republicans dominated state elections back in 2010, leaving them few openings this year. (Governors serve four-year terms everywhere but Vermont and New Hampshire.)

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The Two-Way
2:19 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Sandy Hook Killer's Father Wishes His Son Hadn't Been Born

Flowers, candles and stuffed animals at a makeshift memorial in Newtown, Conn., the week after 20 children and 6 adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 8:47 am

"How much do I beat up on myself about the fact that he's my son? A lot."

The New Yorker has posted a long piece based on six interviews with Peter Lanza, whose son Adam killed 20 first-graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, 2012.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Despite Diplomatic Tensions, U.S.-Russia Space Ties Persist

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth.
Bill Ingalls NASA

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 4:40 am

Update 1:15 a.m. EDT Tuesday:

A Russian Soyuz capsule carrying a U.S.-Russian crew has landed safely in Kazakhstan, according to NASA. American Mike Hopkins and Russians Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy had spent 166 days in space. Russian space officials had considered delaying the landing because of heavy snowfall and strong winds but decided to go ahead with the original plan.

Original Post:

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History
2:11 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

QUIZ: What Came Out Of World War I?

World War I was when the old world became the new. Here, a German cavalryman wears a gas mask and carries a long spear or pole, from two different ages of war.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 2:10 pm

World War I shook up the world in a dramatic way — and from that chaos emerged inventions, words and other things we still use today.

Can you identify them all?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:11 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Mexican Drug Lord Shot Dead ... For Second Time

Nazario Moreno Gonzalez, in an image from one of the quasi-religious books his cartel distributed.
Heriberto Rodriguez MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:06 am

Nazario Moreno Gonzalez, one of Mexico's reputed drug lords, has now been killed twice.

Well, perhaps we should say that he's been declared dead for the second time.

The head of "the cultlike, pseudo-Christian La Familia cartel" was supposedly killed back in December 2010 during a two-day shootout with police.

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Sports
2:06 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

The Ragged Edge: A Runner Chasing Greatness Finds His Muse

Eric Ashe, 25, is hoping to qualify for the Olympic marathon trials at the Boston Marathon this spring.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 4:32 pm

Through the spring, NPR will be tracking eight runners competing in the 2014 Boston Marathon. This is the story of Eric Ashe, the fastest of the eight.

At mile 10, he could tell it was going to be close. Eric had consistently run each mile at a 4:47 pace.

He had to finish 13.1 miles in 65 minutes to qualify for a spot in the Olympic trials in Los Angeles in 2016.

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Your Money
2:05 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Groups Use Cash Prizes To Encourage Saving

Maya Gaines, of the Baltimore CASH Campaign, tries to encourage people to put aside some of their tax refunds into savings. She rings bells, cheers and dances every time someone decides to do that.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 11:16 am

When it comes to getting ahead in the world, a lack of savings can be a big hurdle, especially for low-income families. Most don't have enough money set aside for emergencies, let alone for college or a house. Some people think the answer is to make savings more fun, like the lottery, with the chance to win big prizes.

It's called prize-linked savings, something that's been available in Great Britain for decades. Now, it's starting to catch on in the United States.

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The Salt
2:05 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Freshly Baked Art: Cookies That Are A Feast For The Eyes

Rebecca Weld (aka The Cookie Architect) nabbed the Oscar of the cookie world for this series of Nantucket-themed biscuits.
Courtesy of Rebecca Weld via Cookie Connection

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:52 am

Rebecca Weld of Potsdam, N.Y., makes her living as an architect. But during her free time, she's hunched over the kitchen counter, like an alchemist, dripping food coloring drop by drop into icing to achieve the perfect color.

"I use rich colors for that dated, antique feel," Weld says.

Antique? Perhaps. But certainly not old school. Weld's cookie designs are astonishingly intricate — including a scene from an Adirondacks lake that looks like you could dive right into it.

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Shots - Health News
2:04 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Memories Can Go Astray When We Step Outside Our Bodies

The illusion of an out-of-body experience made it harder for people to remember what happened.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 11:19 am

Our bodies may help us remember our lives, fixing experiences in place. By using virtual reality, scientists can make people feel like they're outside their own bodies. And when they do, the brain struggles to remember what happened.

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