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Simon Says
12:45 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Shirley Temple's Films Still Charm After All These Years

Shirley Temple started performing in films when she was just 3 years old.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 7:47 pm

Shirley Temple really could be as effervescent as a jolt of ginger ale and as cheery as a maraschino cherry in the kid's cocktail that is still ordered by her name. When Shirley Temple Black, the name she used after her marriage to Charles Black, laughed — and she liked to laugh — tears came to her eyes.

She told us how once she'd been called to jury duty, and learned the case involved erotic bondage.

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The Protojournalist
12:45 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

What We Might Learn From Snoring Weather Cats

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 3:11 pm

Sometimes it feels like all the fancy meteorological machinery and prognostication equipment is actually working. And that the weather folks may finally be able to predict — albeit with constant updates and countless hedge words — what the weather is going to be.

At least for the next day or so.

But is that good enough?

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Author Interviews
12:44 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Through The Mind Of A Novelist, Lincoln Shares His Life Story

Jerome Charyn is the author of nearly 50 books, a variety of fiction and nonfiction.
Mariana Cook Courtesy of Liveright

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 7:43 pm

Abraham Lincoln may be the most biographied, analyzed, deified, second-guessed and impersonated figure in U.S. history. He's been seen as Carl Sandburg's mournful prairie genius and Gore Vidal's shrewd railroad lawyer, who knew when to play the rube.

He's been portrayed in comprehensive histories by James McPherson, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and hundreds more in the sweeping movies of John Ford and Steven Spielberg.

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Law
12:44 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Flood Of Gay Marriage Cases Releasing Stream Of Federal Rulings

Virginians demonstrate outside Federal Court in Norfolk, Va., on Feb. 4. The judge ruled this week that Virginia's ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 7:48 pm

A federal judge in Virginia struck down that state's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage this week. It's just the latest in a string of similar rulings in conservative states, and it indicates that the strategy for winning marriage equality in federal courts is moving faster than many had expected.

In her ruling, U.S. District Judge Arenda Wright Allen said Virginia's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional because "core civil rights are at stake." She compared the case to the landmark 1967 Supreme Court ruling recognizing interracial marriage.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Mars 'Jelly Doughnut' Mystery Solved: It's Just A Rock, NASA Says

This composite image provided by NASA shows before-and-after images taken by the Opportunity rover on Mars of a patch of ground taken on Dec. 26, 2013, showing the "Pinnacle Island" rock.
AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:21 pm

It appeared out of the red, like something dropped by a Martian Homer Simpson. But now NASA has an explanation for the "jelly doughnut" object photographed by the Opportunity rover in December.

First, here's what it isn't: It is not a fungus-like Martian organism, nor is it ejecta shot into the air by a nearby (and unseen) meteor impact.

Instead, it's geologic roadkill. Basically.

"We drove over it," Opportunity's Deputy Principal Investigator Ray Arvidson said in a statement on Friday.

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Shots - Health News
12:43 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

When A Prescription For Pain Pills Becomes A Gateway To Addiction

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 9:48 am

On the surface, the 39-year-old construction worker looks like any other patient with back pain. He came to the Washington, D.C., emergency room, where I work, in severe discomfort after moving heavy cinder blocks a few days before.

The pain gets worse with twisting and bending, but he has no numbness or weakness in his legs. There's no tenderness along his spine, no difficulty urinating, no fever, so there's nothing to suggest a fracture, infection, spinal cord mass or anything other than a muscle strain.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:43 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

'O Wind A-Blowing!'

Robert Loebel Vimeo

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:05 am

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Winter Olympics
4:50 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

How They Fared: Whitman Student Skis First Race At Olympics

Medals Ceremony in Olympic Park at Sochi, Russia.
Sarah Brunson U.S. Ski Team

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 1:29 pm

A college ski racer from Sun Valley, Idaho says she is "immensely relieved" just to finish her first Winter Olympic race in one piece.

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The Salt
4:49 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

For The Love Of Oysters: How A Kiss From The Sea Evokes Passion

Lunch with oysters and wine by Frans van Mieris, 1635-1681.
Universal Images Group UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 4:58 pm

Question: Which of these foods are said to stir passion? An oyster, and avocado or a turnip? (Scroll down to the bottom for the answer.)

One of these, at least, is a gimme. The stories linking oysters and other shellfish to lust go back to at least the ancient Greeks.

Think of the image of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, rising out of the sea from the half-shell.

"There's something primal about eating oysters," says oyster-lover MJ Gimbar. He describes them as creamy and velvety. "It's like a kiss from the ocean."

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A Blog Supreme
3:09 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

After 18 Years Of Marriage And Two Children, A Couple Releases Their Debut Albums

Shamie Royston (left) and Rudy Royston, married for nearly two decades, have recently issued their own debut albums as bandleaders.
Mike Molaire/John Rogers for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 3:09 pm

The basic story behind drummer Rudy Royston's first album sounds like that of many sidemen in jazz. He moved to the New York area. His talent got him into bands led by higher-profile artists like Bill Frisell, JD Allen, Ben Allison and Dave Douglas. And when it came time to document his own composing and arranging, he could rely on the network he had tapped into. Douglas issued Royston's album 303 earlier this month on his own record label, Greenleaf Music.

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This Is NPR
3:08 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

An Alaskan Romance Story – Finding Love over the Bushlines

Detricia Hahn and Dave Anderson have been happily married for five years.
Detricia Hahn

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 8:55 am

How many texts did you send today? Maybe one or two were similar to these messages:

To the Princess of Bear Cove, Birthdays come and birthdays go – but few like you retain that glow. Happy belated bday from all of us. From Club Humpy

To the Kumquats – don't forget to pay your land tax – its due today! From the Carrots

To the Bear Cove Harbor Master – Batten down the hatches, tie an anchor on the dog and be safe. From the Geezers in Girdwood

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Politics
3:08 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Boehner Fights Back Against Tea Party, Again

House Speaker John Boehner leaves a news conference on Capitol Hill earlier this month.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 4:58 pm

A high-stakes drama played out over the debt ceiling on Capitol Hill this week. It ended with President Obama getting exactly what he'd asked for — an extension of the Treasury's borrowing authority with no strings attached — and an even wider gulf between GOP congressional leaders and Tea Party-aligned conservatives.

Underlying the Republican rift was House Speaker John Boehner's determination to avoid another episode like last fall's government shutdown.

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Science
3:07 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Illegal, Remote Pot Farms In California Poisoning Rare Wildlife

Fishers are among the small carnivores threatened by rat poisons used to guard plants at illegal marijuana farms.
John Jacobson U.S Fish & Wildlife Service

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 4:58 pm

People who grow marijuana illegally in the backwoods of Northern California use large amounts of rat bait to protect their plants — and these chemicals are killing several species of wild animals, including rare ones, biologists say.

Here's what happens: The growers plant their marijuana in remote locations, hoping to elude detection. They irrigate their plants — with water from streams — which lures animals looking for water. Rodents chew the flourishing plants to get moisture, which kills the plants. Researchers believe that's the prime reason growers use the poisons.

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NPR Story
3:07 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Olympic Photo Of The Day: Don't Blink

Speedskaters train Friday at the Adler Arena Skating Center at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 2:59 pm

Speedskaters train Friday at the Adler Arena Skating Center at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Skaters can reach top speeds of over 30 mph on the track.

More Olympics coverage can be found at The Edge.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Author Of Book Yanked In India Says Move Has Backfired

Indian activists from the student wing of Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party protest near the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi on May 25, 2010, against Wendy Doniger's The Hindus. Penguin Books, India, said this week that it would withdraw the book and pulp it.
Anindito Mukherjee EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 5:09 pm

We told you earlier today [Friday] about a University of Chicago professor whose book was withdrawn in India after a Hindu group brought a court challenge against the publisher, Penguin Books, India.

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