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The Salt
1:44 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Save The Escargot! Snail-Devouring Predator Rears Its Head In France

A specimen of Platydemus manokwari collected in a greenhouse at Caen in Normandy. You can see its white pharynx protruding from the underside, ingesting soft tissues of a specimen of the Mediterranean snail.
Pierre Gros/PeerJ

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 4:06 pm

Oh, no, not the escargot!

A vicious little worm with an appetite for snails has made its European debut. And that has some scientists worried about the future of France's famed mollusk appetizer.

The New Guinea flatworm (Platydemus manokwari) is the lone worm on the Global Invasive Species Database's list of 100 of the world's most dangerous invaders. And last November, it was discovered in a greenhouse in Caen, Normandy.

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Is There A Better Way To Track Aircraft During Flight?

Adm. Mohd Amdan Kurish of the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency Admiral, left, checks radar during a search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane off Tok Bali Beach in Kelantan, Malaysia, on Sunday.
Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 2:41 pm

In a story yesterday [Monday] about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, David Ison, assistant professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, had this to say:

"In this day and age, having no ability to pinpoint these aircraft is really not acceptable. We have technology to make it happen. We really need to do something ... so we can prevent the loss of aircraft."

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Shots - Health News
1:43 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Young People Lag Behind In Health Insurance Enrollment

The proportion of sign-ups for health insurance by age group on the federal and state exchanges.
HHS

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 3:58 pm

With 20 days left for people to sign up for private health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, the number of people who have completed that task rose to 4.2 million through the end of February, the Obama administration reports.

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History
1:26 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

A World Without World War I, Featuring Health-Nut Hitler

Vladimir Lenin in 1900. In our counterfactual history, his career as the producer of the musical Pins and Needles is only a few years away.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:43 pm

This is part of an All Things Considered series that imagines a counterfactual history of World War I.

This summer marks 100 years since the start of World War I. Many argue that the conflict was inevitable — but what if it wasn't?

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Environment
1:16 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

A Plan To Eliminate Wild Mute Swans Draws Vocal Opposition

The latest move to eradicate invasive species has put the mute swan in the cross hairs in New York.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 8:02 am

A plan in New York state to eliminate all wild mute swans there by 2025 has drawn protests and petitions on all sides. While some see elegant white birds gliding across the water, others see a dangerous aggressor destroying the local ecosystem.

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All Tech Considered
1:16 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Evolved Science: Crowds Can Catalog Bugs Faster

Notes From Nature allows volunteers to digitally catalog thousands of scientific specimens, like this insect from the Calbug project.
Screengrab NotesFromNature.org

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 4:55 pm

The next evolution of science is not happening in a lab, but in a basement in a rural Florida county. Thanks to online crowdsourcing, thousands of non-scientists can visit a site called Notes From Nature and lend a hand to university researchers cataloging their collections, from bark to bugs.

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Parallels
12:52 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Norway Takes The Lead In Electric Cars (With Generous Subsidies)

Jonette Øyen with her Nissan Leaf outside the National Archives in Norway, where she works. Next month Norway is expected to become the first country where one in every 100 cars is purely electric.
Sidsel Overgaard NPR

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 3:51 pm

When Jonette Øyen bought her first electric car, it turned heads. "Now nobody turns around!" she says with a laugh.

Sometime in April, Norway is expected to become the first country where one in every 100 cars is purely electric. One percent may not sound like a huge figure, but in the U.S., the equivalent number would be something close to .07 percent.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox Files For Bankruptcy In U.S.

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 12:36 pm

Weeks after its financial troubles forced it to file for bankruptcy protection in Japan, Mt. Gox has obtained similar protection in the U.S. The Tokyo-based bitcoin exchange suffered a collapse after a reported theft of hundreds of millions of dollars.

Mt. Gox had been the most active bitcoin exchange before it announced the loss of hundreds of thousands of units of the cryptocurrency in an attack by hackers. The company said its own bitcoins were stolen along with those of customers.

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Shots - Health News
11:38 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Questions Remain About Whether Doctors Can Curb Children's Drug Use

The exam might also include questions about alcohol and drugs.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:20 am

What can doctors do to help kids stay away from drugs?

There's not much evidence to say one way or the other, it turns out.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which issues guidelines on what doctors should and shouldn't do, said there aren't enough reliable studies around to come up with any solid advice. So the task force gave the interventions an "I" for insufficient evidence. The kids might call it an incomplete.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Deborah Hersman Stepping Down As Head Of NTSB

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman briefing reporters about the July 2013 crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:49 am

Deborah Hersman, known to many Americans because she's the face of the National Transportation Safety Board at the scene of plane crashes and other transportation-related disasters, is stepping down as head of the NTSB.

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The Salt
10:55 am
Tue March 11, 2014

For A Faster-Aged Bourbon, You Need The Motion Of The Ocean

Jefferson's Ocean bourbon is aged on the high seas, a technique that takes advantage of basic physical chemistry. The bottles sell for $200 a piece.
Courtesy of OCEARCH

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 7:48 am

From its earliest days as America's homegrown whiskey elixir, Kentucky bourbon has been traveling on boats.

In fact, boats were a key reason why Kentucky became the king of bourbon. In the late 1700s, trade depended on waterways, and distillers in the state had a big advantage: the Ohio River. They'd load their barrels onto flatboats on the Ohio, which flowed into the Mississippi, taking their golden liquor as far down as New Orleans.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Tue March 11, 2014

CIA Tampered With Senate Panel's Work, Feinstein Says

Sen. Dianne Feinstein speaks to reporters after speaking about her oversight committee's problematic relationship with the CIA Tuesday. CIA Director John Brennan says his agency isn't trying to delay the panel's report on the U.S. interrogation program.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 2:32 pm

The Senate's intelligence oversight panel had its computers searched by CIA workers, who also improperly removed some documents that had been provided to the panel, Sen. Dianne Feinstein said in a lengthy and scathing speech on the Senate floor Tuesday. She said some of the actions could be illegal or unconstitutional.

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Tiny In-Nose Filters Aim To Keep Allergies At Bay

The glasses aren't going to help with your allergies. But some inventors think that a tiny dust-blocking device might.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:23 am

For the millions of people with allergies, spring can mean months of antihistamines, nasal steroids and avoiding nature.

So we were intrigued when we came across the concept of nasal filters – tiny devices that claim to block pollen and other allergens from ever entering nasal passages.

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Guns On Campus
10:43 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Idaho Students Make Last-Ditch Effort To Kill Guns-On-Campus Bill

File photo of the campus of Boise State University
Laura Gilmore Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 4:13 pm

Idaho university students are making a last-minute attempt to stop a measure that would allow people to carry concealed weapons on campus.

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Author Interviews
10:33 am
Tue March 11, 2014

For Working Moms, Key To Balance May Lie In Elusive Leisure Time

fourthexposure iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:33 pm

If your to-do list is so long that you are overwhelmed just looking at it, and if your list has you mentally racing back and forth between your responsibilities to your children and your job, what Brigid Schulte has to say may be helpful.

Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time is about the pressures on working mothers and fathers that lead to a constantly racing heart, consuming guilt and the certainty that they've become inadequate at home and at work.

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