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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Kerry Warns Indonesia: Climate Change Threatens 'Entire Way Of Life'

Secretary of State John Kerry gestures while speaking about climate change in Jakarta on Sunday.
POOL Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:11 am

Secretary of State John Kerry is continuing a push to move climate change to the top of the global agenda, telling an audience in the archipelago nation of Indonesia that rising global temperatures and sea levels could threaten their "entire way of life."

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Norwegian Mass Killer Demands 'Adult' Video Games In Prison

The verdict against Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik is delivered in Oslo on Aug. 24, 2012.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 2:56 pm

Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik, serving a 21-year sentence for a 2011 shooting and bombing rampage that killed 77 people, is threatening to go on a hunger strike unless a list of demands, including access to "adult" video games and a better game console, is met by authorities.

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The Edge
1:22 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

U.S. Men's Alpine Skiers Grab Bronze And Silver

Bode Miller of the United States makes a jump during men's super-combined downhill training at the Sochi 2014 Winter Games on Tuesday.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 6:42 am

Athletes prepare for years to compete in the Olympics, and then, in a flash, it's all over. For American speed skaters it's been a terrible Olympics, but U.S. men's Alpine skiers are managing to turn around a medals drought.

In the men's super-G competition Bode Miller won the bronze. At 36 years old, he is the oldest person ever to win a medal in Alpine skiing at the Olympics. It makes him one of the most decorated American winter Olympians, winning a total of six medals in three different Olympics.

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The Edge
1:21 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

U.S. Men's Hockey Beats Slovenia, Securing Spot In Quarterfinals

USA forward Zach Parise reaches for a loose puck in front of Slovenia goaltender Luka Gracnar during the 2014 Winter Olympics men's ice hockey game on Sunday.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:15 am

The U.S. men's hockey team nearly shut out Slovenia in the Winter Olympics on Sunday but allowed one goal in the final seconds of the game. The 5-1 win gives the U.S. team an automatic spot in the quarterfinals.

Virtually every hockey game here in Russia is, of course, an away game for the U.S. team. The opposing teams have more fans, more flags, more face paint.

Each time one of Slovenia's players prepared to shoot, its fans chanted. But it was only at the very end of the game that they got to stand and cheer their lone goal.

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Law
1:21 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

It's Proven To Save Lives, So Why Is Maine Opposed To Narcan?

Naloxone hydrochloride, also known as Narcan, is an overdose antidote that many states have made available to first-responders.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 8:44 am

Dr. Lynn Ouellette, a psychiatrist from Brunswick, Maine, asks herself "What if?" a lot these days. What if they had found her son just a few minutes earlier? What if they had gotten him to the hospital sooner?

What if they'd had the overdose antidote Narcan in the house?

"What we know is that this saves lives and it gives addicts another chance," she says.

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Health
1:20 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

'Worth The Pain': A Life Transformed Overnight By Meningitis

After contracting meningitis B, Andy Marso had all of his toes and all but one finger amputated.
Courtesy of Andy Marso

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 8:49 am

Students at Princeton University and the University of California, Santa Barbara, are still on alert after outbreaks bacterial meningitis late in 2013.

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Movies
1:20 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Martin Scorsese Takes Poland's Communist-Era Art Films On The Road

The hero of Andrzej Wajda's Ashes And Diamonds is torn between fighting Poland's post-World War II communist regime and returning to a normal, peaceful life.
Courtesy of Milestone Film

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 8:44 am

Martin Scorsese fell in love with Polish movies when he was in college.

"The images have stayed in my head for so many years, since the late '50s," he says. "I close my eyes, I see them, especially from Ashes And Diamonds, from The Saragossa Manuscript. They're very vivid, expressive, immediate."

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Shots - Health News
1:19 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Research Shows New Flu Viruses Often Arise In Domestic Animals

New research finds a close connection between the flu that devastated the horse population in North America in the 1870s and the avian flu of that period.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:17 am

As flu-watchers like to say, you can always count on influenza virus to surprise.

The latest revelation is that scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from. The dogma is that they always incubate in wild migratory birds, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.

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It's All Politics
3:06 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

GOP Struggles To Sell Message In Big Cities

Kevin Faulconer reaches for his wife, Katherine, at a Feb. 11 rally as their daughter looks up from below. Faulconer, a Republican, won the San Diego mayoral race last week.
Lenny Ignelzi AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 7:48 pm

San Diego voters did something highly unusual last Tuesday: They elected a Republican as mayor.

San Diego will now be the largest city in the country with a Republican mayor, Kevin Faulconer, who has been serving on its city council. The next largest is Indianapolis.

In fact, of the nation's 100 largest cities, a grand total of nine now have GOP mayors, plus two other Republicans who are nominally independent.

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Three Books...
3:05 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Muses And More: 3 Books We Owe To Writers' Lovers

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:43 pm

Many writers used their romantic partners as inspiration for characters and plot lines: Tolstoy's courtship of his wife, Sophia, became the model for Levin's wooing of Kitty in Anna Karenina, while Gustave Flaubert shamelessly infused intimate details about his mistress into the titular Madame Bovary. But some scribes owe much more to their significant others. These career-defining books might never have graced our shelves if it weren't for writers' strong-willed other halves.

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

Adolf Hitler salutes to a crowd of soldiers at a Nazi rally in 1938. Years later, in the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

In the fall of 1944, the United States and its allies launched a secret mission code-named Operation Paperclip. The aim was to find and preserve German weapons, including biological and chemical agents, but American scientific intelligence officers quickly realized the weapons themselves were not enough.

They decided the United States needed to bring the Nazi scientists themselves to the U.S. Thus began a mission to recruit top Nazi doctors, physicists and chemists — including Wernher von Braun, who went on to design the rockets that took man to the moon.

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Code Switch
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Drive For Diversity, NASCAR's Commitment To Race

Darrell Wallace Jr., a graduate of NASCAR's Drive for Diversity Program, celebrates after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Kroger 200 at Martinsville Speedway on Oct. 26 in Martinsville, Va.
Robert Laberge NASCAR via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

On Sunday, the K&N Pro Series East begins down in New Smyrna Beach, Fla. And if the track and pit look a little more diverse than they have in the past, that's in part because of a NASCAR program designed to entice different communities to try out the sport.

Market research says NASCAR's bread-and-butter fan base is about 60 percent male and 80 percent white, mostly from the Southern and Midwestern states. But as the country continues to become even more diverse, the sport is working to make sure its fan base is, too.

That's a challenge.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Fugitive Finally Captured: 'The Eyes Gave Her Away'

Under the name Marie Walsh, Susan LeFevre was on the lam from a Michigan prison for 32 years before being re-arrested in 2008 — also in San Diego.
AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

Earlier this winter, Lt. Charles Levens from the Michigan Department of Corrections was stuck at work.

"Well, that day was a bad snow day," he says. "We were not working too much in the field. The roads were horrible, the temperatures were below zero and it was a good day to work on some cold cases."

Cooped up in his office, he pulled out an old file on a woman named Judy Lynn Hayman. She was an escapee who broke out of a Michigan prison in 1977.

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Music Interviews
3:04 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

A Man, A Plan, A Concept Album About Panama

On the new album Panama 500, pianist Danilo Pérez considers five centuries of his home country's history.
Raj Naik and Luke Severn Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:18 pm

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The New And The Next
2:33 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Super-Secure, Temporary Texts Draw Interest Of Business Crowd

Image Source

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:00 am

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about a new texting service that promises tight security. While Snapchat has become a popular way to text photos that disappear after a number of seconds, recent hacks have raised questions about its security. A service called Privatext provides an alternative that has gained interest among some professionals.

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