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It's All Politics
3:02 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Edwin Edwards: Governor, Convict, Reality TV Star — Congressman?

Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards and his new wife, Trina Grimes Scott, after getting married in the French Quarter in New Orleans, La., in July 2011.
CHERYL GERBER AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 1:43 pm

Rascally former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards was once so confident about re-election that he declared "the only way I can lose is if I'm caught in bed with either a dead girl or a live boy."

That was 30 years ago, when Edwards, 86, was a much younger man. It was long before the Democrat served eight years in prison for racketeering, conspiracy and extortion.

And it was a lifetime – or two — before a recent cringe-inducing reality television show about life with his young wife, her teenage sons and his own grandmother-aged daughters from a previous marriage.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Who's Your Buddy? It's Canada, Americans Say

U.S. and Canadian fans attend the women's hockey gold medal game in Sochi Thursday. A recent Gallup poll finds that Americans see Canada in the most favorable light, compared to other countries.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 2:14 pm

America's favorite foreign country is its neighbor to the north, according to a new Gallup World Affairs poll. The research firm says Americans' opinions of several countries have shifted. Russia has slipped, for instance. And so has North Korea – the country is now alone in the "least favorable" category.

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Around the Nation
3:02 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Gay-Marriage Battle Moves South, And Religious Right Fights Back

Nick Van Sickels (right) with his husband, Andrew Bond, and their daughter, Jules. The couple was legally married in Washington, D.C., but because same-sex marriage is banned in Louisiana, Bond has no parental rights.
Janet McConnaughey AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 5:02 pm

The legal battle over gay marriage is moving to the Deep South. Buoyed by federal court victories in Oklahoma, Kentucky and Virginia, gay-rights activists are taking on traditional marriage laws in the very states where those laws enjoy overwhelming public support.

Take Alabama, where Paul Hard is suing the state for violating his constitutional rights to equal protection and due process following the death of his partner, David Fancher, whom he legally married in Massachusetts. Alabama has a constitutional amendment that forbids same-sex marriage.

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Shots - Health News
3:01 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Doctors Urge Patience, And Longer Labor, To Reduce C-Sections

A C-section delivery may be needed to protect the health of mother and child. But too many are done for the wrong reasons, doctors say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:22 am

Women with low-risk pregnancies should be allowed to spend more time in labor, to reduce the risk of having an unnecessary C-section, the nation's obstetricians say.

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Science
1:43 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Scientists Fear Ecological Disaster In Nicaragua's Planned Canal

A channel big enough to handle global shipping would require deep dredging throughout Lake Nicaragua, the largest source of fresh water in Central America.
Esteban Felix AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 5:02 pm

Scientists are raising the alarm about the possible environmental consequences of a huge shipping canal that could cut across Nicaragua, from the Pacific to the Atlantic.

The government of this Central American nation has signed a deal with a Chinese company that is planning to build a maritime shortcut that would compete with the Panama Canal. Construction could begin next year — yet there's no official route for the canal and no assessment of its potential impacts on the environment.

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The Salt
1:43 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

'Piglet Smoothie' Fed To Sows To Prevent Disease; Activists Outraged

A screen grab from an undercover video released by the Humane Society of the U.S. shows a pig in a gestation crate at Iron Maiden Farms in Owensboro, Ky.
Courtesy of The Humane Society of The United States

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:37 am

Animal welfare groups go to great lengths to show us how "the sausage" is made inside the factory-style farms that produce most of our meat. For the past few years, they've armed activists with video cameras and sent them undercover to document alleged abuses or risky practices.

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Code Switch
1:42 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Georgia Clears The Road For Confederate-Themed License Plate

The Sons of Confederate Veterans submitted this license plate design to the state of Georgia, which recently approved it.
AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 5:02 pm

The Confederate battle flag is back in the news in the American South, as civil rights leaders in Georgia decry the state government's approval of a new specialty license plate.

The design is actually an updated version of what has been available for years. The original had one small flag in the corner. This new version adds a background image of the Confederate emblem across the entire width of the plate.

The design was submitted by the Georgia chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Spokesman Ray McBerry says they see the flag as a symbol of their roots.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Olympic Photo Of The Day: Celebration Slide

Matthias Schrader AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 12:12 pm

Norway's Magnus Hovdal Moan (from left), Joergen Graabak, Magnus Krog and Haavard Klemetsen dive as they celebrate winning the gold medal of the Nordic combined large hill cross-country team competition at the Sochi Winter Olympics on Thursday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.

The sport features two events: Each team member has a jump on a large hill and is awarded points. The total of each team's points decides its start time for the second event, a 4x5-kilometer cross-country relay race.

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Found Recipes
1:36 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Festive In Purple, This Pasta's Got A Sweet Side

Julia della Croce often couples purple and gold gnocchi (made with two varieties of sweet potato) for a striking sight — and a delicious meal.
Celina della Croce and Nathan Hoyt Courtesy of Julia della Croce

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 5:02 pm

When you're an expert on Italian cooking, as Julia della Croce is, it's a rare pasta that will take you by surprise. Even with the Italian dumplings known as gnocchi — not exactly as common as your average spaghetti — Julia knows the ins and outs of the dish in ways that many others might not, whether it's made with squash, stale bread, semolina or potatoes.

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All Tech Considered
1:35 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Deep Learning: Teaching Computers To Tell Things Apart

Cat Or Dog? Sure, you can easily tell the difference. But a machine may not be able to guess on the first try.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:03 pm

WhatsApp may be Facebook's latest prize, but it's not the company's most ambitious investment. In recent months, the social networking giant has begun funding something potentially far more revolutionary: artificial intelligence.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Men Who Vandalized Egyptian Pyramid To Prove Theory Face Charges

Domique Goerlitz shown in one of the pyramid's chambers in this screen grab from their video, which has apparently been removed.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 2:41 pm

Two self-styled amateur archeologists from Germany, who filmed themselves scraping off pieces of Egypt's Great Pyramid in hopes of proving that the ancient wonder was built by people from the legendary city of Atlantis, are now facing possible criminal charges in their home country.

During a trip to Egypt in April 2013, Dominque Goerlitz and Stephan Erdmann, along with a German filmmaker, were granted access to parts of the Great Pyramid at Giza that are normally off-limits to the public. They smuggled their samples back to Germany with plans to produce a documentary.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Men Who Vandalized Egyptian Pyramid To Prove Theory Face Charges

Domique Goerlitz shown in one of the pyramid's chambers in this screen grab from their video, which has apparently been removed.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 2:41 pm

Two self-styled amateur archeologists from Germany, who filmed themselves scraping off pieces of Egypt's Great Pyramid in hopes of proving that the ancient wonder was built by people from the legendary city of Atlantis, are now facing possible criminal charges in their home country.

During a trip to Egypt in April 2013, Dominque Goerlitz and Stephan Erdmann, along with a German filmmaker, were granted access to parts of the Great Pyramid at Giza that are normally off-limits to the public. They smuggled their samples back to Germany with plans to produce a documentary.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:33 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Ape Dread, Dog Worry: Animals And Anxiety

Fernando Camino Cover/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Like joy and grief, anxiety is something we share with certain other animals.

Chimpanzees and elephants sometimes get anxious. Dogs and cats too. They are aware creatures who — at times — becomes fearful about the bad things that might happen (or happen again).

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Books
11:20 am
Thu February 20, 2014

Author James Patterson To Give $1 Million To Bookstores

James Patterson writes suspense and thriller novels as well as children's books. He runs the children's literacy campaign ReadKiddoRead.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 9:43 am

James Patterson, the best-selling author of thrillers and romance and young adult novels, has pledged to give away $1 million of his personal fortune to independent booksellers around the country. Today, he announced the names of the dozens of booksellers who are receiving grants in the first round of his big giveaway.

The money is heading toward smaller bookstores, which are under pressure from competitors like Amazon and e-books. Patterson's own books are big sellers everywhere — he doesn't depend on small bookstores to succeed. But his giveaway is driven by a broader concern.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Thu February 20, 2014

In Venezuela, Another Beauty Queen's Death Adds To Anger

This photo, which witnesses say shows Venezuelan beauty queen Genesis Carmona being evacuated from the scene of a protest on Tuesday, is ricocheting around the Web. She died after being shot.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 8:40 am

There's a sad symmetry to the news from Venezuela, where anti-government protests in recent weeks have been fueled in part by outrage over the shooting death of a beauty queen — a death that underscored that nation's struggle to control violent crime.

One of the five people killed this week during protests against the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro, it's now being reported, was another young beauty queen.

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