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Deceptive Cadence
1:42 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Gil Shaham And When The World 'Got Much Smaller, Much Faster'

Star violinist Gil Shaham, whose newest recording project surveys the wildly different violin concertos of the 1930s.
Luke Ratray Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 5:02 pm

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Shots - Health News
1:42 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Mammogram Uncertainty Gives Patients, Doctors More Reason To Talk

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:46 am

I am 51 years old and have had a yearly mammogram, more or less, since the age of 40.

I got them despite the fact that there is no history of breast cancer in my family. I did it because that was what my doctor and others, including the American Cancer Society, recommended.

Three years ago, I was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer after a screening mammogram. I underwent a mastectomy and chemotherapy. The doctors say my prognosis is good.

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Shots - Health News
1:42 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Legal Drinking Age Of 21 Saves Lives, Even Though It's Flouted

Students drink outside the Rose Bowl during the NCAA BCS national championship game in January.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:46 am

Eighty percent of college students say they drink, despite laws making it illegal for anyone under 21 to drink alcohol. Critics of that drinking age say that lowering it would reduce binge drinking and alcohol-related deaths.

But that might be wishful thinking, a study says. Researchers from Boston University reviewed scientific literature published since 2006 and concluded keeping the legal drinking age at 21 reduces rates of drunk driving and crashes, and reduces rates of underage drinking.

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Around the Nation
1:36 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Older Americans' Breakups Are Causing A 'Graying' Divorce Trend

The divorce rate for Americans over 50 doubled between 1990 and 2010.
Alexander Abramov iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 6:04 am

For baby boomers, divorce has almost become, like marriage, another rite of passage. The post-World War II generation is setting new records for divorce: Americans over 50 are twice as likely to get divorced as people of that age were 20 years ago.

But just because it's more common, doesn't mean it's not still painful.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Rep. John Dingell, Who Has Served A Record 58 Years, Is Retiring

Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 10:23 am

Michigan Democratic Rep. John Dingell, who was first elected to Congress in 1955 to fill a seat his father had held, says he will not seek re-election later this year.

He'll leave office having served in Congress longer than anyone else in history. Last June, Dingell passed the previous record holder, the late Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Va.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Oldest-Known Holocaust Survivor Dies; Pianist Was 110

Alice Herz-Sommer in July 2010.
'The Lady in Number 6' AP

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 8:46 am

  • From the documentary 'The Lady in Number 6': Alice Herz-Sommer says whether life is good or not 'depends on me.'

There are many remarkable things to say about Alice Herz-Sommer, who until her death in London on Sunday was thought to be the world's oldest survivor of the Nazi Holocaust.

To start with, there's her age: Herz-Sommer was 110.

Then there are the people she knew, including writer Franz Kafka — who died in 1924.

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Harold Ramis, 'Ghostbuster' Actor And 'Groundhog Day' Director, Dies

Harold Ramis in 2009. He died Monday.
Jim Prisching AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:10 pm

Harold Ramis, who was in the director's chair for the comedies Groundhog Day and Caddyshack and was one of the stars of the Ghostbuster movies, has died. He was 69.

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Brain Science
9:05 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain

In the Institute for the Unsalvageable in Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania, shown here in 1992, children were left in cribs for days on end.
Tom Szalay

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 9:07 am

Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development.

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Latin America
12:58 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

El Chapo's Arrest Punctures Drug Lord's Near-Mythical Status

Mexican Marines escort Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman to a helicopter in Mexico City on Saturday.
Marco Ugarte AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 9:18 am

One of the world's most powerful drug lords has been captured. Mexico's head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was arrested in an operation that Mexican officials say involved the cooperation of U.S. authorities.

Guzman has been on the run for years and his capture puts an end to one of the longest and most profitable careers in the drug world. That capture began as the sun rose up over the hotel-lined beaches of Mazatlan early Saturday morning.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Head Of Ukrainian Parliament Assumes Presidential Power

A woman cries Sunday in front of a memorial to people killed in clashes with police in Independence Square, Kiev.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 2:04 pm

This post was updated at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych's opponents are moving quickly to take government power, although no one is certain how permanent those moves will be.

The Ukrainian legislature has voted to give the president's powers temporarily to the Parliament speaker, Oleksandr Turchinov.

On Sunday, Turchinov addressed the nation, saying that Ukraine was ready to talk to Moscow about improving relations, but made it clear that further integration with Europe would be his top priority.

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Author Interviews
12:58 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

In 'Kinder Than Solitude,' History Always Haunts

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 8:57 am

Kinder Than Solitude, the latest novel from Chinese-American author Yiyun Li, examines the impact of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre on a generation of youth. Following three friends, the novel alternates between 1990s Beijing and present-day America, where two of the friends immigrated. At the heart of the story is the mysterious murder that brought the three friends together over 20 years ago, and what they're only now learning about it.

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The Edge
12:57 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Flame Goes Out In Sochi, Torch Passes To Pyeongchang

Pyrotechnics explode over dancers formed into the Olympic rings during the closing ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, on Sunday.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:42 am

This post was last updated at 1:40 p.m. ET.

The torch has officially been passed. The 22nd Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, are over with all the drama in the competition and not over safety and security during the 17 days of the events, as many had feared.

Outdoor fireworks rattled Sochi's Fisht Stadium as the Olympic flame was set to be extinguished Sunday. Winners and losers in the international competition now will have to look east to South Korea to test their Olympic mettle in the contest for medals four years from now, in 2018.

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Remembrances
12:57 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Writer Mavis Gallant Portrayed 'Lost Souls' Of Post-WWII Europe

More than 100 of Mavis Gallant's short stories were published in The New Yorker.
Louis Monier Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 12:43 pm

Unless you've been a devoted reader of New Yorker short stories for the last 60 years, you may not know the name Mavis Gallant. The magazine published more Gallant stories than almost any other writer, except John Updike.

She died Tuesday in Paris at age 91.

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Fitness & Nutrition
12:56 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

Can Exercising Seniors Help Revive A Brooklyn Neighborhood?

Linda Beckford (right) exercises as part of a walking group that tries to make their neighborhood a better place to live. If nothing else, the seniors feel more confident about going outside.
Quoctrung Bui NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 8:57 am

The Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., is known for many things, among them huge public housing projects, extremely high poverty and crime. Last summer, a one-year-old boy was shot in the head and killed as he sat in a stroller in the neighborhood.

But that's one side of life in Brownsville. Down the street from that murder, on weekday mornings, is another side.

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My Guilty Pleasure
12:56 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

For This British Author, If It Bleeds, She Reads

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 4:03 am

The first thing you need to know about my guilty pleasure is that you probably share it. George Orwell certainly did. He writes about it in his 1946 essay, Decline of the English Murder: "It is Sunday afternoon ... Your pipe is drawing sweetly, the sofa cushions are soft underneath you, the fire is well alight, the air is warm and stagnant. In these blissful circumstances, what it is that you want to read about? Naturally, about a murder."

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