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The Two-Way
9:32 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Australia: Objects Spotted By Satellite Imagery May Be Linked To Jet

Amid speculation and confusion about the missing Malaysia Airlines flight, Kuala Lumpur International Airport has a message board for the passengers and crew.
Vincent Thian AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:48 am

Australian satellite images found objects that are possibly connected to the Malaysia Airlines flight that went missing with 239 people on board March 8. "New and credible information has come to light in relation to the search," Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott told his Parliament on Thursday.

"The Australian Maritime Safety Authority has received information based on satellite imagery of objects possibly related to the search," Abbott said. "Following specialist analysis of this satellite imagery, two possible objects related to the search have been identified."

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The Two-Way
9:23 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Houston Police Find 109 People In Suspected 'Stash House'

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 6:29 pm

Police in Houston on Wednesday found more than 100 people being kept by suspected smugglers in a so-called "stash house."

KHOU-TV reports that the conditions inside the house were "awful." The station adds:

"'There is no hot water in the house. There is a toilet that partially works—one bathroom for in excess of 100 people,' said HPD spokesman John Cannon.

"Police said there was human waste all over the house.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Why Ukraine's Situation Makes Russia's Other Neighbors Nervous

A column of Russian troops prepares to leave the checkpoint at a bridge over the Inguri River in Western Georgia, in October 2008, after securing the secession of Georgia's breakaway South Ossetia region.
Levan Gabechava Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 7:42 am

When Vladimir Putin announced the Kremlin's annexation of Crimea this week, he made it clear that the region's large Russian-speaking population made the move necessary and inevitable.

In fact, large populations of Russian speakers are common along the fringes of the old Soviet Union. Those groups are made up of a combination of indigenous people and Russians who migrated from the mother country, many as part of Soviet-era policies aimed at altering the ethnic makeup in potentially troublesome satellites.

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It's All Politics
3:57 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

White House Launches Climate Change Data Website

People walk along Venice Beach in Los Angeles. A new climate-focused U.S. government website will provide data on sea level rise and coastal flooding.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:04 pm

The White House on Wednesday rolled out a new initiative designed to make climate data more accessible to researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming.

The project includes the introduction of a climate-focused section of the federal government's open data platform at climate.data.gov; an innovation challenge to solicit ideas from the private sector to demonstrate coastal flooding; and collaboration with companies like Google and Ersi to provide technological support.

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Shots - Health News
3:57 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Ad For Surgical Robot Violated University of Illinois Policies

Doctors perform surgery with the da Vinci robot.
Intuitive Surgical AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:01 pm

An internal review by the University of Illinois has found that an advertisement in which a university surgical team endorsed a pricey surgical robot violated school policies.

Though the team acted "in good faith," the review concluded, the episode pointed to the need for clearer rules and stronger enforcement.

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Around the Nation
3:56 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Long, Hot Winter Puts Western Fire Officials On Edge

Flames approach the Blakiston Ranch in California last May during the Springs fire. It eventually torched more than 24,000 acres.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:16 pm

The view from atop Conejo Mountain is postcard-worthy. It's 360 degrees of Southern California: mountains, coastline, cookie-cutter homes.

But if you look closer, the greens, blues and browns of Conejo are charred away, burnt a charcoal black.

Mike Lindbery, a captain with the Ventura County Fire Department, was here on this mountain last spring when a wildfire raced up the hillside on its way to torching more than 24,000 acres.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Al-Qaida Spokesman: I Warned Bin Laden That U.S. Would Kill Him

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith appears in this still image taken from an undated video address. Abu Ghaith, one of Osama bin Laden's sons-in-law and a former spokesman for al-Qaeda, is on trial in New York.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:16 pm

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, took the stand in his trial in New York on Wednesday, telling the jury that he warned the al-Qaida leader that America would "not settle until it kills you."

In the surprise testimony, Abu Ghaith recalled a conversation with bin Laden in a cave in Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

"Did you learn what happened? We are the ones who did it," Ghaith recalled, through an Arabic interpreter, his infamous father-in-law asking.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

For The New York Metro Area, A Chance To See A Rare 'Occultation'

Regulus, the bright star on the upper left, is part of a multiple star system, with a close companion double star visible to the upper right of the young main sequence star.
Russell Croman NASA

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 6:12 pm

People in the New York City metropolitan area — including parts of New Jersey and Connecticut — will be able to see one the brightest stars in the night sky blink.

In scientific terms, Regulus, the brightest star of the constellation Leo, will be occulted by an asteroid just after 2:05 a.m. ET on Thursday.

As Space.com reports, this is an exceedingly rare event:

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 6:13 pm

One year ago Pavel Rucsineanu was running out of options.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis was ravaging his lungs. And the disease had evolved into an incurable form, doctors said.

It's like an "infectious cancer," Dr. Tetru Alexandriuc said at the time. "We have no other medicines" to treat Pavel, the doctor added. Although he wouldn't say it, the doctor expected TB would kill Pavel.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Most U.S. Women Wouldn't Know A Stroke If They Saw Or Felt One

The rupture of a weakened portion of blood vessel (the dark blue spot in this brain scan of a 68-year-old woman) can prompt bleeding and death of brain tissue — a stroke.
Simon Fraser Science Source

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 7:04 am

When it comes to treating a stroke victim, every minute counts.

Each moment that passes without treatment increases the likelihood of permanent damage or death. So the first steps to getting help are being able to spot a stroke in yourself or others and knowing how to respond.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Fed Reduces Bond Purchases By Additional $10 Billion

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:22 pm

The Federal Reserve continues to see "progress in the labor market," so it will continue to wind down its economic stimulus program.

After a meeting, the Federal Open Market Committee decided it would now buy $55 billion in bonds per month. That's a drop of $10 billion a month.

That said, the Chair of the Federal Reserve Janet Yellen said during her first press conference that the U.S. economy still faces some headwinds.

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Media
1:00 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In The Absence Of Answers, We Return Repeatedly To The Questions

Jean-Paul Troadec (center), special adviser to France's aviation accident investigation bureau, speaks to journalists on Tuesday.
Lai Seng Sin AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:45 pm

The view from inside a media circus is an odd one, indeed.

But I got a glimpse of the scenery a few days ago, when CNN asked me to weigh in on the similarities between the real-life missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the myriad of fictional TV shows or movies where similar events have unfolded.

Why are we so drawn to these stories? anchor Suzanne Malveaux asked me in a few different ways, perhaps wanting an emotional take on how the plane crash scene in the TV series Lost or the film Alive could have ended Flight 370's mysterious voyage.

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Parallels
1:00 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Western Sanctions On Russia Are 'A Shot Across The Bow'

Russian President Vladimir Putin looks on as Crimean leaders sign a treaty for Crimea to join Russia on Tuesday. In response, Western countries have imposed limited sanctions.
Sergei Ilnitsky AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:59 pm

Russian officials were quick to mock the limited economic sanctions on Moscow announced by the U.S. and Europe this week. In response to Russia's annexation of Crimea, Western leaders have frozen the assets of a handful of government officials and also barred them from getting visas to travel to the West.

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The Salt
12:40 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Could Our Food Supply Be A Target For Terrorists?

Few livestock owners consider their operations targets of terrorism. And that mindset could leave them vulnerable.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:51 pm

It sounds like the plot of a Hollywood blockbuster: Villains bent on chaos set their sights on a food company — an easy target — with plans to lace its products with a chemical or pathogen. The hero finds out in time to save the day.

Sound far-fetched? Not according to U.S. regulators who have been pondering such scenarios.

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Shots - Health News
12:39 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Half Of Americans Believe In Medical Conspiracy Theories

Twenty percent of Americans think that cellphones cause cancer and that the government and big corporations are covering this up.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:08 pm

Misinformation about health remains widespread and popular.

Half of Americans subscribe to medical conspiracy theories, with more than one-third of people thinking that the Food and Drug Administration is deliberately keeping natural cures for cancer off the market because of pressure from drug companies, a survey finds.

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