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3:54 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

It Was The Best Of Sentences ...

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:41 am

Have you ever had a sentence stop you in your tracks? Editors at The American Scholar magazine have put out their list of the "Ten Best Sentences" in fiction and nonfiction. Associate editor Margaret Foster says the inspiration came from water cooler talk around the office.

"We're sometimes struck by a beautiful sentence or maybe a lousy sentence, and we'll just say, 'Hey, listen to this,' " she says.

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Shots - Health News
3:53 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:03 am

The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.

Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Tissue samples from children without autism didn't have those characteristic patches.

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Books
3:53 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

In Karen Russell's World, Sleep Is For The Lucky Few

cover detail
Atavist Books

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:14 am

Getting much sleep lately? The citizens of Karen Russell's dystopian novella, Sleep Donation, haven't been getting any. It's the near future, and America has been suffering from an insomnia crisis where hundreds of thousands of cases are terminal. And so an agency called Slumber Corps has been established to battle the problem.

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Shots - Health News
3:53 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

That Health Insurance Deadline Now Comes With Wiggle Room

Christine Moyer checks out options at a health insurance enrollment fair on March 18 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 5:24 pm

We're just five days away from the March 31 deadline to sign up for individual health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. For weeks, administration officials, including the president, have insisted that there would be no extensions to the scheduled end of the six-month open enrollment period.

But now there's some wiggle room. Let's review, shall we?

Start with the key question: Is Monday still the deadline?

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All Tech Considered
3:06 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Backlash To Facebook Buying Virtual Reality Firm Comes Swiftly

Attendees wear Oculus Rift HD virtual reality headsets at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:08 am

When Facebook purchases a company, you can often hear a collective groan go around the Internet — "There goes the neighborhood."

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NPR Story
12:39 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Glacial Debris and Saturated Soil: A Geological Recipe For Mudslides

The following images were taken on March 24 during an aerial survey conducted by the Washington State Department of Transportation, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Geological Survey, and King County Sheriff's Office. (King County Sheriff's Office - Air Support Unit)

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 12:26 pm

The official death toll from Saturday’s massive landslide near Oso, Wash., now stands at at least 16.

Emergency managers say they have located other bodies under the mud, and will add them to the total only after they’re recovered.

Dozens of people are still listed as missing or unaccounted for.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tom Banse of the Northwest News Network reports on the ongoing rescue and recovery efforts.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

New Dwarf Planet Found At The Solar System's Outer Limits

This diagram for the outer solar system shows the orbits of Sedna (in orange) and 2012 VP113 (in red). The sun and terrestrial planets are at the center, surrounded by the orbits (in purple) of the four giant planets — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The Kuiper belt, which includes Pluto, is shown by the dotted light blue region.
Scott S. Sheppard Carnegie Institution for Science

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 5:44 am

Scientists have spotted a new dwarf planet at the edge of our solar system. It's a kind of pink ice ball that's way out there, far beyond Pluto.

Astronomers used to think this region of space was a no man's land. But the new findings suggest that it holds many small worlds — and there are even hints of an unseen planet bigger than Earth.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

For The First Time, Astronomers Find Asteroids Can Have Rings

An artist rendering of Chariklo and its two rings.
Lucie Maquet

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 12:20 pm

Astronomers studying a 250 kilometer wide asteroid-like object named Chariklo have come to a surprising conclusion: By analyzing dips in the object's brightness, they've found that Chariklo is surrounded by a ring system.

Their findings are published in today's edition of Nature and this is the first time rings have been found on a body this small. In the past, scientists thought only giant planets — like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune — had the gravitational heft to support rings.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:52 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Listening To The Echoes Of Creation

The National Science Foundation's South Pole Station, home to the BICEP2 telescope.
Steffen Richter Harvard University

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:58 am

Nine days ago, the unbelievable became believable as an enthralled scientific community heard the announcement of an amazing experimental result: For the first time, astronomers detected signals from events dating back to the origin of the universe. Scientists heard the first echoes of creation.

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Shots - Health News
11:50 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Therapists' Apps Aim To Help With Mental Health Issues

The ReliefLink app is a mood-tracking tool intended to help people who are contemplating suicide.
Courtesy of Emory University

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:53 am

Games like Flappy Bird and Candy Crush have helped many of us de-stress during long waits at the doctor's office and crowded Metro rides. But what if an app could actually help with mental health?

Researchers from Hunter College and the City University of New York say they've developed an app that can reduce anxiety.

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Shots - Health News
11:50 am
Wed March 26, 2014

A 'Silent Killer' Returns: Live Chat With Filmmaker On Fighting TB

Nokubheka, 12, had to move away from her family and into a hospital for treatment against drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Screenshot from PBS/YouTube

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:32 am

The world has a new epidemic on its hand: drug-resistant tuberculosis.

We're not talking about the kind of TB that doctors can cure with a few weeks of standard antibiotics.

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All Tech Considered
11:18 am
Wed March 26, 2014

How A Cold Brew Can Stop You From Checking Your Smartphone

A beer glass that only stands if it can rest on your smartphone.
Fischer & Friends Agency

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:29 am

Regular All Tech readers may know that we've been exploring the social norms around obsessively checking your smartphone while out with real, live human beings. Is it a big no-no, or a new normal? Is it totally not cool in a movie but OK to peek at dinner?

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Hawaii's Police, Lawmakers Reach Consensus On Prostitution Law

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:00 am

Honolulu police officials and key legislators in Hawaii now agree that a state law needs to be changed so that undercover police officers will be breaking the law if they have sexual relations with prostitutes.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:18 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Debate: Does Affirmative Action On Campus Do More Harm Than Good?

Martha Stewart Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:26 am

Many colleges and universities use race as a factor in admissions, but the approach has been a hot-button issue for decades — even making its way to the Supreme Court several times since the late 1970s.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Secret Service Agents Recalled From Overseas For Drinking

Members of the U.S. Secret Service's Counter Assault Team, known in the agency as CAT, are seen before boarding helicopters at a landing zone in Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on Monday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 10:52 am

Another embarrassing episode for the Secret Service: The latest involves reports of three agents being recalled from the Netherlands for a night of drinking ahead of President Obama's arrival there this week for a two-day summit.

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