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The Salt
6:58 am
Fri March 28, 2014

The Hippest Winery In Mexico Is Made Of Recycled Boats

Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent incorporated materials salvaged from boats into the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley.
Courtesy of Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:22 am

A lot of artists say they find inspiration in unlikely places. Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent, designers based in Ensenada, Mexico, most often find theirs digging through dumpsters and junkyards.

Their work, however, isn't remotely trashy. One of their latest creations, the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley, is sleek and totally modern. It's one of a growing number of wineries that's designed to give visitors a memorable visual experience — not just a taste of fine wine.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes.
Mary Levin/University of Washington

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 6:17 am

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Census Estimate Shows New Shift To Urban Core

Houston, Tex., experienced the greatest population growth according to new census estimates. It is part of a trend of growing cities in the Midwest. (Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:53 pm

New census numbers show that the population of the country is increasing in the center of cities — and especially in cities in the West.

Vishaan Chakrabarti, urbanist, architect and author of ” Country of Cities: A Manifesto for Urban America,” told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson the two main factors driving young people and retirees back to cities are economic and environmental.

However, Chakrabarti says the renaissance of cities also reveals major deficits in urban areas.

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Book Reviews
2:29 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The Backwards Life Of Alex Chilton In 'Destruction'

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 8:12 am

Alex Chilton was 16 and hung over from a night of drinking, smoking, and having sex in a cemetery the morning in 1966 that he showed up at a Memphis studio to record his first single, "The Letter." It became the biggest hit for his new band, The Box Tops, and the biggest hit single ever recorded in Memphis — but Chilton almost didn't live to see it. Between the time "The Letter" was recorded and released, he attempted suicide by slitting his wrists. He lived.

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Music
1:32 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

It's Good To Gather Moss: A Young Artist On Missing 'Home'

Dan Croll's debut album is Sweet Disarray.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 4:03 pm

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Code Switch
1:31 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Poll Finds Big Racial Gap On Compensating College Athletes

Northwestern University quarterback Kain Colter has been leading a push to start a union for college athletes.
Paul Beaty AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 2:23 pm

A decision yesterday by the National Labor Relations Board found that football players at Northwestern University were, in effect, employees of their school. That means that Northwestern players can move forward with plans to form a union — a move that sent shock waves through the world of college athletics, even though it's too early to know just what it will mean.

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Shots - Health News
1:25 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Jump In Autism Cases May Not Mean It's More Prevalent

State numbers on autism probably don't accurately reflect children's health status, researchers say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 1:39 pm

The government's latest estimate shows that 1 in 68 children in the U.S. has an autism spectrum disorder. That's a remarkable jump from just two years ago, when the figure was 1 in 88, and an even bigger jump from 2007, when it was just 1 in 150.

But officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the agency's skyrocketing estimates don't necessarily mean that kids are more likely to have autism now than they were 10 years ago.

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Found Recipes
1:24 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Before You Bake Brooklyn's Legendary Cake, Heed A Warning

Beware the siren's call of this chocolate delight: Ebinger's Blackout Cake is as arduous to make as it is delicious to taste.
Jennifer Yin Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 10:04 am

For Brooklyn, Ebinger's Blackout Cake was a decades-long institution. Ebinger's Bakery opened in 1898, quickly flourishing with dozens of locations throughout the borough. There was a time when, if you lived in Brooklyn, you lived near an Ebinger's — and you knew its famous blackout cake. The signature chocolate dessert had a rabid following among Brooklynites, until the bakery went bankrupt in 1972.

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The Salt
1:24 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The Search For The Perfect Cup Of Coffee Can Be Such A Grind(er)

Doug and Barb Garrott assemble a Lido 2 grinder at their home in Troy, Idaho. They've spent the past three years perfecting their design for the hand-cranked machine.
Jessica Greene

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 5:31 am

In the tiny town of Troy, Idaho, Barb and Doug Garrott have spent the past three years perfecting a machine that could change the morning routines of coffee drinkers all over the country: a $175 hand-cranked coffee grinder.

It's called the Lido 2, the first run of 500 has already sold out on preorder, and coffee aficionados are asking for more.

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Shots - Health News
1:22 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions.
Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 4:03 pm

Using the labor of dozens of undergraduate students, scientists have built a customized yeast chromosome from scratch.

It's a milestone in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, where organisms can be tailored for industrial use. In this case, the near-term goal is to understand the genetics of yeast, and eventually the genetics of us.

This was quite an undertaking. Yeast have about 6,000 genes packed in 16 tidy bundles called chromosomes. Each chromosome is an enormous molecule of DNA packed in proteins.

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Movie Interviews
11:17 am
Thu March 27, 2014

For Actor Michael Peña, A Transformative Role As Cesar Chavez

Michael Pena as Cesar Chavez
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:59 am

The new film Cesar Chavez brings to life the famed civil rights leader, who organized farm laborers and fought to secure a living wage and better working conditions in the fields. He founded the United Farm Workers union in California in 1962, and his work inspired millions of people in the U.S. and internationally. Actor Michael Peña, who plays Chavez, spoke with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about how he prepared for the role and what it meant to him and his family.

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Performing Arts
11:15 am
Thu March 27, 2014

From Walter White To LBJ, Bryan Cranston Is A Master Of Transformation

Over the course of Breaking Bad, Walter White (Bryan Cranston) metamorphosed from a high school chemistry teacher to a notorious outlaw.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:15 pm

In the 2008 pilot of AMC's Breaking Bad, high school teacher Walter White fails to interest his chemistry students in the study of change. But over the course of the series, Walt himself came to exemplify radical change, using his knowledge of chemistry to become a master meth cook, and transforming himself into a notorious outlaw who was willing to kill, when necessary, to keep his operation running.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:08 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Happy 80th Birthday, Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall holds a baby Cebus capucinus monkey during a 2013 visit to a primate rescue center in Chile.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:44 am

On April 3, one week from today, Dr. Jane Goodall, the world-renowned chimpanzee expert and conservationist, will turn 80.

In advance of this milestone birthday, we all have a chance to thank Goodall for her lifelong work on behalf of chimpanzees and other wildlife.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Congress Approves Ukraine Aid, Sanctions On Russia

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:03 pm

The House and Senate approved $1 billion in loan guarantees for Ukraine and sanctions on Moscow for Russia's annexation of Crimea.

Thursday's voice vote in the Senate and a 399-19 vote in the House for a different version of the bill came just hours after the International Monetary Fund pledged $18 billion in assistance for the former Soviet satellite.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Thu March 27, 2014

After Blocking Twitter, Turkey Moves To Stop YouTube

A man tries to get connected to YouTube with his tablet at a cafe in Istanbul on Thursday.
Osman Orsal Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:50 am

Authorities in Turkey are reportedly going ahead with a ban on access to YouTube days after a similar move in the country to block Twitter.

The Turkish telecommunications authority TIB is quoted in Turkish state media as saying it has taken an "administrative measure" against YouTube.

The news follows earlier reports that a recording, allegedly of a meeting among top Turkish officials discussing military intervention in Syria, was posted on YouTube.

Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan on Thursday lashed out against the post:

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