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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Wed April 2, 2014

GM Has 'Culture Of Cover-Up,' Key Senator Says

General Motors CEO Mary Barra as she testified Wednesday on Capitol Hill.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 10:14 am

Day Two of General Motors CEO Mary Barra's time testifying before Congress about safety problems with her company's cars has been highlighted by a top senator saying the company "repeatedly lied" about its problems and has fostered a "culture of cover-up."

From The Detroit News:

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All Songs Considered
11:11 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Recommended Dose: The Best Dance Tracks Of March

Greek producer Giganta released an excellent EP, Force, on Actress' Werkdiscs label in March.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:18 am

In the world of dance music, March will be remembered first and foremost for the passing of house progenitor Frankie Knuckles on the final day of the month. If you haven't read our remembrance by Barry Walters, please stop what you're doing and check it out. It's hard to put into words what Knuckles meant to dance music, which makes Walters' piece all the more impressive.

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Shots - Health News
11:10 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Is It Time To Reconsider Breast Self-Exams?

Twitter user @AshleighEarley participates in the The Sun's Check'em Tuesday campaign.
Twitter.com

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:56 am

Perhaps your mother told you. Or your doctor. Maybe you learned it in gym class.

For me it was all three: "Once a month, do a breast self-exam," they all said. "Use your fingertips in a circular motion to feel for lumps." (My mom, a nurse, even brought home a fake breast that I could practice on.)

So I was stunned when a physician in Glasgow, Scotland, criticized a campaign aimed at getting women to do their own breast checkups.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Supreme Court Strikes Down Overall Limits On Political Contributions

People wait in line for the beginning of the 2013-2014 Supreme Court term in Washington on Oct. 7. The court heard the first major case on campaign contribution limits since 2010's landmark Citizens United.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:34 am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down an overall cap on the amount that large campaign donors can give to parties and candidates in a two-year election cycle.

In a 5-4 decision split between conservatives and liberals on the high court, the court said the limits were a violation of the First Amendment.

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Malaysian Official: Fate Of MH370 May Never Be Known

Malaysia's national police chief Khalid Abu Bakar speaks during a news conference in Kuala Lumpur, last month.
Wang Shen Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:51 am

With no wreckage found yet that can be linked to Flight MH370 and time beginning to run out for a homing beacon on the 'black box' flight data recorder, Malaysia's police chief says the mystery of the missing airliner may never be solved.

Khalid Abu Bakar says the criminal investigation into the disappearance of the Malaysia Airlines flight could "go on and on and on.

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Paying For College
10:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research

Students from CUNY's AstroCom NYC program meet for a weekly class at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Dennis Robbins, an associate professor of science education at CUNY's Hunter College, teaches Betsy Hernandez (from left), Jaquelin Erazo, Ariel Diaz and Mario Martin.
Beth Fertig WNYC

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 10:04 am

Shooting for the stars is expensive.

Advanced sciences like astronomy require years of study and graduate degrees. And the soaring cost of college can be a heavy obstacle for low-income and minority students hoping to break into those fields.

A program at the City University of New York hopes to lift that burden by providing scholarships and one-on-one mentoring to underrepresented students.

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Parallels
10:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

A group of 3,000 ordinary citizens, armed with nothing more than an Internet connection, is often making better forecasts of global events than CIA analysts. Here, a man crosses the CIA logo at its headquarters in Langley, Va.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 10:04 am

The morning I met Elaine Rich, she was sitting at the kitchen table of her small town home in suburban Maryland trying to estimate refugee flows in Syria.

It wasn't the only question she was considering; there were others:

Will North Korea launch a new multistage missile before May 10, 2014?

Will Russian armed forces enter Kharkiv, Ukraine, by May 10? Rich's answers to these questions would eventually be evaluated by the intelligence community, but she didn't feel much pressure because this wasn't her full-time gig.

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Shots - Health News
10:13 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Ethicists Tell NASA How To Weigh Hazards Of Space Travel

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide makes a space walk outside the International Space Station in 2012.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:55 am

NASA is hoping to soon venture out farther into space than ever before. But these long journeys mean astronauts could face greater risks to their physical and mental health than the space agency currently allows.

Now, an independent group of experts convened by the Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, has weighed in on how NASA should make decisions about the kinds of risks that are acceptable for missions that venture outside low Earth orbit or extend beyond 30 days.

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Parallels
10:12 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Afghanistan's Next President Will Be ...

A man walks past a billboard for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in the Afghan capital Kabul. President Hamid Karzai is stepping down and the country is poised for its first-ever democratic transition of power. The ballot is set for Saturday.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:47 am

Afghanistan's presidential election on Saturday will usher in a host of important changes: incumbent Hamid Karzai is stepping aside, it's not clear who will replace him, and the vote will mark the first time the country has ever swapped leaders at the ballot box.

Karzai won the two elections (2004 and 2009) held since the Taliban were ousted in 2001, but is barred by term limits from running again.

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This Is NPR
10:12 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Happy Birthday, Carl Kasell!

Caitlin Sanders NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:12 am

Today we wish the one and only Carl Kasell, official judge and scorekeeper of Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me, a very happy birthday as he turns 80 years young.

Happy 80th birthday, Carl!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
10:10 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Weekly Innovation: Turn A 3-D Printer Into A Tattoo Machine

Antoine Goupille may be the first human tattooed by a robot.
Courtesy of Pierre Emm

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:00 pm

Behold, the first human to be tattooed by a 3-D printer. The machine tattooed a ring on his forearm.

It all started with an idea that came to Pierre Emm, a young student in France, while riding his bike on the way to design school. (Another reason to cycle for your commute — wacky yet innovative ideas!)

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:10 am
Wed April 2, 2014

What Universe Is This, Anyway?

Observing the multitude of galaxies in our own universe is a piece of cake. Observing the multiverse, if such a thing exists, seems impossible. Above, the Milky Way rises above the ESO's ALMA observatory in Chile.
Y.Beletsky ESO

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:21 am

Let's take a walk on the wild side and assume, for the sake of argument, that our universe is not the only one; let's say there are many others, possibly infinitely many, "out there." The totality of this bizarre ensemble is what cosmologists call the "multiverse," a hypothesis that sounds more mythic than scientific, a conceptual troublemaker that inspires some and outrages others.

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The Salt
10:09 am
Wed April 2, 2014

The Old And Mysterious Practice Of Eating Dirt, Revealed

Dr. William Rawlings holds a piece of kaolin from his hometown of Sandersville, Ga.
Courtesy of Adam Forrester

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:51 am

There's an old saying in the South: "A child's gotta eat their share of dirt."

Mamie Lee Hillman's family took this literally, but they weren't after just any old dirt.

"I remember my mom and my aunties eating that white dirt like it was nothing," says Hillman, who grew up in Greene County, Ga., and used to go with her family to dig for their own dirt to snack on. "It was an acceptable thing that people did."

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Kitchen Window
9:48 am
Wed April 2, 2014

How To Get To Sesame Treats: Open A Can Of Tahini

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 6:29 am

If you were going to make a desert-island list for your refrigerator, it's unlikely tahini would make the cut. In fact, it might not even be in your standard mainland refrigerator, unless you regularly cook food with a Middle Eastern or hippie influence. Which is a bit of a shame. Because tahini is quite lovely, and capable of much more than we usually give it credit for.

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Code Switch
11:21 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

In #CancelColbert, A Firestorm And A Lost Opportunity

A joke Stephen Colbert made on his show last week was retweeted by Comedy Central. The joke — shorn of its context because, well, Twitter — sparked an online firestorm, and the hashtag #CancelColbert.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 3:27 pm

At first, the idea of canceling The Colbert Report over a wayward tweet sounded like handing out the death penalty for a speeding ticket.

And as much as I understand the notion of using a provocative hashtag to fuel an important conversation, the #CancelColbert controversy mostly shows the difficulty of deciding just how offensive a joke based in stereotypes really is.

And there's a more important question: Once you determine something awful happened, how does it get fixed?

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