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Shots - Health News
9:40 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Nearly Half Of Californians Who Used Exchange May Drop Coverage

Last-minute applicants for health insurance jam the Bay Area Rescue Mission in Richmond, Calif., on Monday.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 11:06 am

An analysis of the people who signed up for health insurance on California's exchange found that they are likely to drop the coverage for a pretty good reason: They found insurance elsewhere.

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The Salt
9:40 am
Thu April 3, 2014

'Hot' Oregon Blueberry Fight Prompts Farm Bill Changes

It's unclear exactly how the new law will change enforcement of wage and hour laws on farms. Meanwhile, a blueberry labor dispute in Oregon grinds on in federal court.
David Wright/Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 12:42 pm

American consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about the working conditions of the people who pick, pack and harvest their food. And retailers are responding. Wal-Mart is now paying Florida farm workers more for each pound of tomatoes picked. Whole Foods is using worker wages to rank the sustainability of the produce and flowers it sells.

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The Two-Way
9:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

NASA Suspends Some Ties With Russia Over Ukraine Crisis

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth.
Bill Ingalls NASA

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:46 pm

NASA is suspending "the majority of its ongoing engagements" with its Russian counterpart over the crisis in Ukraine.

The Verge, which first broke the news based on a leaked memo, reports that "the suspension includes travel to Russia, teleconferences, and visits by Russian government officials to NASA facilities. NASA is even suspending the exchange of emails with Russian officials."

NASA confirmed the story in a statement late Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Shooting At Fort Hood Leaves 4 Dead, 16 Injured

Lucy Hamlin and her husband, Spc. Timothy Hamlin, wait for permission to re-enter the Fort Hood military post, following a shooting there Wednesday.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:37 am

This post has news through 11:20 p.m. ET on Wednesday. For updates since then, click here.

A gunman opened fire on the military post of Fort Hood, Texas, on Wednesday, killing three and injuring 16, before putting the gun to his head and killing himself, Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley said at a televised news conference.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
1:37 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Cycling's Catching On In Texas, For A Very Texas Reason

Bicycles and pedicabs along a dedicated bike lane in Austin, Texas.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 6:54 pm

For years, cyclists have faced long odds in Texas, where sprawling highways teem with trucks. Dallas was ranked the worst city for bicycling in the country, several years in a row. But in recent years, the two-wheeled form of transportation has begun to gain ground.

It's no surprise that progressive Austin — where the disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong still lives — has plenty of cyclists.

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Shots - Health News
1:35 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions.
Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 11:31 am

A high-resolution map of the human brain in utero is providing hints about the origins of brain disorders including schizophrenia and autism.

The map shows where genes are turned on and off throughout the entire brain at about the midpoint of pregnancy, a time when critical structures are taking shape, researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Putin Divorce Final; Ex-Wife Expunged From Kremlin Bio

Vladimir Putin and Lyudmila arrive at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, in a March 2012 photo.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:18 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his wife of 30 years, Lyudmila, are now divorced, the Kremlin confirmed Wednesday.

The divorce was finalized months after the couple announced on national television in June that they intended to end the marriage. At the time, Putin said: "It was a joint decision: we hardly see each other, each of us has our own life." She called the divorce "civilized" and added that the two would always remain close.

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Author Interviews
1:33 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 6:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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The Salt
1:31 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:55 pm

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

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Law
1:30 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Enforcing Prison Rape Elimination Standards Proves Tricky

The Prison Rape Elimination Act standards are now taking effect in many states. Three auditors recently questioned staffers at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in a practice inspection.
Laura Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 6:54 pm

On a recent day at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, inmates in jumpsuits peek out of their cells to see three men with clipboards walk into the housing unit. These men are auditors doing a practice inspection. They're here to see if the facility complies with a federal law called the Prison Rape Elimination Act, or PREA.

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Shots - Health News
1:30 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Run When You're 25 For A Sharper Brain When You're 45

Leading an active lifestyle in your 20s will benefit your brain down the road.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 12:47 pm

If you're in your 20s, you might work out because it's fun, or because it makes you look better. But here's another reason to hit the gym or go for a jog — exercising now may help preserve your memory and cognition later in life.

Researchers figured this out by following 2,700 men and women for 25 years as part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

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NPR Story
11:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Deadline For ATMs Approaching As Microsoft Ends XP Support

(ThinkPanama.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:51 am

On April 8th, Microsoft is ending tech support for Windows XP. That means banks and some private vendors are under pressure to upgrade their ATMs or their systems may be more vulnerable.

Ninety-five percent of the world’s ATMs run Windows XP and upgrading is an expensive proposition. It not only entails changing the operating system but adding new hardware on each ATM, too.

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All Tech Considered
11:14 am
Wed April 2, 2014

While Warning Of Chinese Cyberthreat, U.S. Launches Its Own Attack

Staff members study networking at the training room of the Huawei Technologies Co. headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in June 2011.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:54 am

The U.S. government has long complained about Chinese hacking and cyberattacks, but new documents show that the National Security Agency managed to penetrate the networks of Huawei, a large Chinese telecommunications firm, gathering information about its operations and potentially using equipment it sells to other countries to monitor their computer and telephone networks as well.

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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Wed April 2, 2014

A State Fossil For S. Carolina Faces Mammoth Obstacle

A fossil of a Columbian Mammoth in the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:27 pm

The Columbian mammoth is facing extinction as South Carolina's proposed state fossil unless the elephant-sized Ice Age mammal can survive the efforts of creationist lawmakers.

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NPR Story
11:12 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Some States Seek To Bless Prayer In Public Schools

High school football players in Suitland, Md., pray with their coach Ed Shields (top right) before a game in 2013.
John McDonnell The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:47 pm

Religious groups have been testing the limits on prayer in public school for decades. Now they think they've come up with a new strategy that will allow students to pray wherever and whenever they want.

Bills have been moving in a number of states that would allow students to engage in prayer at school functions such as graduation.

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