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9:21 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Alt.Latino ProFile: 'Everyone Has A Fascinating Story, You Just Have To Listen'

NPR Music's Alt.Latino Host Jasmine Garsd in Mexico City.
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 1:49 pm

Since last summer, Jasmine Garsd has been co-hosting NPR Music's Alt.Latino from Mexico City, where she's reporting on the area's music and culture for NPR. This week, she reunites with her Alt.Latino co-host Felix Contreras in Austin to celebrate the debut of SXAméricas, a new branch of SXSW geared to connect U.S Hispanics, Latin American and Spanish industry thought leaders.

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Shots - Health News
9:20 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Mix Of Gut Microbes May Play Role In Crohn's Disease

In some human diseases, the wrong mix of bacteria seems to be the trouble.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 6:31 pm

The particular assortment of microbes in the digestive system may be an important factor in the inflammatory bowel condition known as Crohn's disease.

Research involving more than 1,500 patients found that people with Crohn's disease had less diverse populations of gut microbes.

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Shots - Health News
8:43 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Obesity Linked To Lower Grades Among Teen Girls

In a British study of nearly 6,000 students, obesity — or perhaps dealing with the stigma associated with obesity — seemed to reduce academic performance.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:23 am

Childhood obesity has made it to the forefront of public health issues, both in the United Kingdom and in the United States.

Now researchers at the Universities of Dundee, Strathclyde, Georgia and Bristol say that not only does obesity affect a child's overall health, but it may also lead to poorer school performance among teenage girls. Among boys, the link is less apparent.

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Book Reviews
8:07 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

In 'Googleplex,' Plato Makes A Bid For Continuing Importance

Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 3:51 pm

Do the 1 percent contribute more to society than they take from it? Is the scientific idea of human nature more accurate than the humanist one? And what's the difference, really, between a boy who likes you, and a boy who "likes" you on Facebook?

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The Two-Way
8:07 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

In Closely Watched Election, Republican Jolly Wins In Florida

Republican David Jolly, shown during a Nov. 23 campaign rally in Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., once worked for the late congressman whose seat he's vying to fill. He has called for repeal of President Obama's health care law.
Steve Nesius AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 8:28 am

This post was updated at 10:30 a.m. on March 12.

Republican David Jolly wrung out a victory during a special election in Florida on Tuesday for the Tampa Bay-area district vacated by the late Rep. Bill Young.

As our friends at It's All Politics reported, the neck-and-neck race between Jolly and Democrat Alex Sink was seen as "a proxy for how President Obama and his signature health care legislation will play at the polls in November."

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The Two-Way
7:57 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Detainee Lawyer Calls Force Feeding In Guantanamo 'Water Cure' Torture

Clouds cover the sky over Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 5:42 pm

A lawyer for a group of detainees at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay Cuba is accusing the military of torture.

NPR's Martin Kaste filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The military keeps hunger-striking detainees alive by forcing liquid food down their throats through a tube.

"Courts have refused to intervene, but lawyer Jon Eisenberg says he has new information that may change that.

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The Two-Way
7:54 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Reports: GM Facing Criminal Inquiry Over Delayed Recall

The Chevrolet Cobalt is one of the GM models being recalled for faulty ignition switches.
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 6:18 pm

General Motors may be facing a criminal investigation over its delay in recalling vehicles with faulty ignition switches blamed for 13 deaths and 31 accidents, The New York Times and Reuters are reporting.

Both news organizations are quoting a person familiar with the investigation.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

What Would It Take To Destroy A Black Box?

The flight data recorder from the 2009 Air France flight that went down in the Atlantic.
Johann PESCHEL AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 6:41 am

When a plane crashes, it can take many months or years to find the black box that can provide clues as to what happened. Just what are these devices, how do they work, and why can they be so hard to find? With the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 making headlines around the world, we contacted the recorders division of the National Transportation and Safety Board to find out.

What is a "black box"?

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It's All Politics
4:45 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Feinstein's CIA Outrage Splits Senate

Sen. Dianne Feinstein accused the CIA publicly and at length of hacking Senate computers to spy on Senate aides and remove documents.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 10:07 pm

The Senate was a chamber divided in reaction to Democrat Sen. Dianne Feinstein's diatribe against the CIA for allegedly hacking into Senate computers.

A no-nonsense Feinstein, the Senate Intelligence Committee chairman, took to the Senate floor Tuesday to speak at length and publicly for the first time about a dispute with the agency.

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U.S.
3:58 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Move To Honor Prohibition-Era 'Untouchable' Hits A Snag

Eliot Ness is credited with assembling a team of federal agents who took down Al Capone in Chicago in the 1930s.
The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:14 pm

Eliot Ness, the famed Prohibition-era agent often credited with bringing down the empire of Chicago mobster Al Capone, is perhaps best known to many from fictional portrayals on the big and small screens.

Although Ness is a legendary figure, some politicians are debating whether the headquarters of the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Washington should bear his name.

Ness began his career as a Prohibition agent in 1926. Four years later, he was the special agent in charge of going after Capone's bootlegging operation.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Not Spring Yet: Wicked Winter Storm To Pound Midwest, New York

A forecast map showing snow and rain across the country on Wednesday.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 3:30 pm

That beautiful spring-like day those of you in the Midwest and Northeast have been experiencing today after a brutal winter?

It's not going to last. As Weather.com reports, temperatures will plunge and then cities from Detroit to Cleveland to Buffalo and Burlington will receive yet another heavy round of snow.

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

People Overload Website, Hoping To Help Search For Missing Jet

An image released by satellite company DigitalGlobe shows an area of the Gulf of Thailand where it's allowing web users to assist in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, using satellite imagery.
DigitalGlobe/National Geographic

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:57 am

A U.S. satellite company's call for help in finding a missing Malaysia Airlines jet brought a strong response on the Internet, as some people hoping to pitch in are finding a website struggling to handle all the web traffic.

The company, DigitalGlobe, says it's working to fix the problem and aid the search for the airliner, which has now been missing for four days. The search area for signs of the jet was widened Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Health Care Enrollments Up, But Still Well Short Of Goal

The HealthCare.gov website has been a source of delays and confusion for those trying to sign up for health insurance under the ACA.
Jon Elswick AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 2:46 pm

Another 940,000 people signed up for health insurance in February under the Affordable Care Act, bringing the total to 4.2 million since the troubled HealthCare.gov website was launched, the Department of Health and Human Services reports. The number is still well short of the administration's goal for March 31, when open enrollment ends.

To reach 6 million sign ups under the ACA, as the White House had hoped for, another 1.8 million people would need to enroll by the end of the month.

As The Associated Press reports:

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Shots - Health News
2:25 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Whole Genome Scans Aren't Quite Ready For Your Doctor's Office

Interpreting the results from a genome scan takes a lot of people time. And the databases used to interpret the results aren't infallible.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 1:08 pm

For more than a decade scientists have been saying that a genomic revolution will transform medicine, making it possible to scan all of a person's DNA to predict risk and customize medical care.

Well, we've got the machines. Where's the revolution?

Getting closer, say researchers at Stanford University, who tested the technology on 12 people. But not quite ready for every doctor's office.

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