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Shots - Health News
12:37 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

HIV Can Spread Through Sexual Contact Between Women

Lesbian couples have a lower risk of spreading HIV to each other than do heterosexual or gay couples.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 12:17 pm

A woman in Texas likely infected her female partner with HIV through sexual contact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

The case offers the strongest evidence to date that HIV transmission between women, although rare, is possible.

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Business
9:33 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Overtime Pay Proposal Triggers A New Debate About Wages

Economists are divided about the White House plan to boost overtime pay for workers.
Doug Finger Gainesville Sun/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 11:56 am

On Thursday, President Obama rolled out his plan for strengthening overtime pay protections for millions of workers. In his view, if more workers got fatter paychecks, they could spend more and stimulate the economy.

But if his critics are right, then employers would end up laying off workers to make up for the higher wage costs. And that would hurt the already painfully slow recovery.

Which scenario is right?

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The Salt
9:28 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Advice For Eating Well On A Tight Budget, From A Mom Who's Been There

JuJu Harris is the author of The Arcadia Mobile Market Seasonal Cookbook. A former recipient of government food assistance, she now teaches healthy eating skills to low-income families in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of Molly M. Peterson

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:47 pm

JuJu Harris didn't set out to write a cookbook, but then again, she didn't set out to accept public assistance to feed her son, either. Harris always wanted to work with nature.

"My dream job was, I was going to grow up and be a national park ranger," she says. It didn't quite work out that way. She drifted from job to job in Oakland, Calif., where she was born. At 32, she joined the Peace Corps, traveling to Paraguay to help local farmers improve their crops.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Holder Backs Reduced Sentences For Some Drug Traffickers

Attorney General Eric Holder appearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, in January.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 12:40 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder is backing a proposal to shorten sentences for nonviolent drug dealers in an effort reduce federal spending on prisons.

Holder appeared before the United States Sentencing Commission on Thursday to announce his support of the panel's recommendations to trim federal guidelines for sentencing of drug traffickers to 51 months from 62 months.

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Shots - Health News
9:27 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Statins Might Not Cause Aching Muscles, But Diabetes Risk Is Real

Statins are widely prescribed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but we may not be getting a clear picture of side effect risks.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:22 pm

People taking cholesterol-lowering statins often report having muscle pain and other side effects. Many quit taking the pills as a result.

But the statins aren't to blame, according to an analysis that found muscle problems no more likely with statins than with a placebo pill.

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Shots - Health News
6:29 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Foul Weather Begets Foul Moods Online

Weather got you down? Cheer up. Your social network feels — and is amplifying — your pain.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:23 pm

We already know that cat memes and BuzzFeed lists spread around Facebook quicker than germs in a kindergarten classroom. But can emotions go viral as well?

Perhaps, researchers say. When your Facebook friends post happy things online, you're more likely to do so too, according to a study published Wednesday. And the same applies for negative posts: If your friends are being grumpy online, you're more likely to post something negative.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

U.S. Judge Throws Out Charges Against Indian Diplomat

Devyani Khobragade at an India Studies Stony Brook University fundraiser in Long Island, N.Y., on Dec. 8, 2013.
Mohammed Jaffer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 6:53 am

A federal judge dropped charges on Wednesday against an Indian diplomat because she enjoys diplomatic immunity.

As Krishnadev reported back in January, the case of Devyani Khobragade, who was indicted on charges of falsifying visa documents for her Indian maid, "sparked a diplomatic row between India and the U.S."

According to a grand jury indictment, Khobragade said she was going to pay her maid $9 an hour. She actually paid her $3.

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Law
3:23 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Ruling On Gay Juror May Cause Ripples In Same-Sex Marriage Cases

A legal dispute between pharmaceutical companies Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham ended up before a federal appeals court. The court's ruling may have implications for laws that concern gays and lesbians.
Tim Boyle Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:14 pm

There was a small development in a case before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals this month that could have a major impact on the legal battle over same-sex marriage. The case involves a dispute between two pharmaceutical companies, a gay juror and the level of legal scrutiny directed by the appellate court.

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Senate Panel Clears Ukraine Aid Package

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 1:54 pm

A bill aimed at punishing Russia for sending its forces into Crimea by imposing sanctions on Moscow and providing economic aid to Ukraine has passed a key vote in the U.S. Senate.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 14-3 to pass the measure that authorizes $1 billion in loan guarantees to the new government in Kiev as well as the freezing certain Russian assets in the U.S.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

New Jersey Judge Rules Women Can Keep Fathers Out Of Delivery Room

The case of whether a woman could keep the biological father of her child out of the delivery room was argued while she was in the hospital to give birth.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 5:39 am

A New Jersey judge likely made history this week when he released an opinion that found women can keep the biological father of their children out of the delivery room.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports that the ruling involves a couple who got engaged after the woman became pregnant but later broke up. The man sued for the right to be present at the birth of his child. Jennifer filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The case was argued by telephone — while the New Jersey woman was in the hospital to give birth.

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Business
2:42 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Health Care Law Helps Entrepreneurs Quit Their Day Jobs

The Affordable Care Act could encourage people to start new businesses by solving an age-old problem: job lock.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 3:37 am

The Affordable Care Act — which many see creating challenges for businesses — could benefit a particular group of business people: entrepreneurs.

Joshua Simonson was reluctant to give up his job at a Portland, Ore., area grocery store, New Seasons Market, which he says had provided excellent health care for him and his family. He had a pre-existing condition that has prevented him from getting insurance in the private market, but one key development helped convince him to quit and start a farm.

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History
1:31 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Without World War I, A Slower U.S. Rise, No 'God Bless America'

Without World War I, the woman's suffrage movement might have been slower to gain traction.
Paul Thompson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:45 pm

This is part of an All Things Considered series that imagines a counterfactual history of World War I.

This summer marks 100 years since the start of World War I. Many argue that the conflict was inevitable — but what if it wasn't?

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Around the Nation
1:29 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Government's Empty Buildings Are Costing Taxpayers Billions

A 132-year-old building owned by the federal government, just six blocks from the White House, has been sitting empty for three decades.
Laura Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 9:07 am

On a street corner in downtown Washington, D.C., David Wise is opening a century-old iron gate in front of an old, boarded-up brick building.

Wise is an investigator for the Government Accountability Office, the government's watchdog group. His mission is to figure out why the government owns so many buildings, like this one, that it doesn't use.

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Theater
1:28 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Road Between Broadway And Hollywood Isn't A One-Way Street

Andy Karl stars in the musical adaptation of Rocky, the story of an underdog boxer who gets a shot at the world championship. "You have to honor, I think, the integrity of what the original film is, but not be constrained by it," says Rocky producer Bill Taylor.
Matthew Murphey Polk & Co.

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:14 pm

Rocky: The Musical. Really?

Producer Bill Taylor says even the show's creators didn't buy the idea at first. "If you speak to all of the authors and all of the creative team, their instinctive reaction, when first hearing about Rocky becoming a musical, ranges from incredulity to plain crazy," he says.

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Shots - Health News
1:28 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

How A Series Of Mistakes Hobbled Minnesota's Health Exchange

Becky Fink, a MNsure navigator, helps Mic-Ryan Freeman, 22, fill out a paper application for health insurance in February at Nucleus Clinic in Coon Rapids, Minn.
Jennifer Simonson/MPR News Photo courtesy of Minnesota Public Radio News and NPR-Kaiser Health News-Member Station Reporting Project. © 2014 Minnesota Public Radio

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 5:14 pm

Minnesota is expected to pick a new lead technology contractor for its health insurance marketplace in the coming weeks. The state has been working hard to improve its website, but in its first few months serious technical problems made it difficult if not impossible to use.

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