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Found Recipes
2:49 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Americans, Just Get Over It And Make The Souffle

Even one fluffy forkful of souffle is a worthy reward for making the effort.
Kelly Gorham Courtesy of Kelly Gorham Photography

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 9:41 am

The souffle shares this in common with some of nature's most vicious predators: It can sense fear. This, at least, according to noted American chef James Beard, who once observed, "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it."

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

What's A Breath Of Fresh Air Worth? In China, About $860

Beijing artist Liang Kegang poses in a Beijing art gallery earlier this week with the jar of fresh air he collected in Provence, France.
Didi Tang AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 9:37 am

It's a classic example of supply and demand: How much would you pay for a bottle of fresh air in one of the world's most polluted cities?

When Beijing artist Liang Kegang returned home from a vacation in France, he brought with him a jar of clean air he had collected from Provence. At auction in a group of about 100 fellow artists and collectors, the jar of air fetched the equivalent of $860, according to The Associated Press.

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Book Reviews
2:25 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

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Shots - Health News
1:22 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Scientists Publish Recipe For Making Bird Flu More Contagious

Street vendors sell chickens at a market in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in early 2013. Last year Cambodia reported more cases of H5N1 bird flu than any other country.
Mak Remissa EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 12:13 pm

The Dutch virologist accused of engineering a dangerous superflu a few years ago is back with more contentious research.

In 2011, Ron Fouchier and his team at Erasmus Medical Center took the H5N1 flu virus and made it more contagious. Now the team has published another study with more details on the exact genetic changes needed to do the trick.

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Parallels
1:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

What A Ban On Taxi Apps In Shanghai Says About China's Economy

The Shanghai government has banned the use of taxi-booking apps such as Kuaidi Dache during rush hour. Here, a Shanghai resident displays the app on his smartphone in Shanghai, on Jan. 23.
Imagine China/Corbis

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 9:58 am

The Chinese mega-city of Shanghai has been cracking down on popular taxi-booking apps, banning their use during rush hour. The government says apps discriminate against older people and those who don't have smartphones.

But economists and some customers see the crackdown as a small, textbook case of something much bigger: the battle between the government and market forces in the world's second-largest economy.

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Shots - Health News
1:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Even A Very Weak Signal From The Brain Might Help Paraplegics

Kent Stephenson, a research participant at the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, has his level of muscle activity and force measured by Katelyn Gurley.
Courtesy of the University of Louisville

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 3:47 am

A report that four young men who are paralyzed below the waist were able to move toes, ankles or knees when their lower spine was electrically stimulated was hailed as a breakthrough.

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Parallels
1:20 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

How Rwanda's Only Ice Cream Shop Challenges Cultural Taboos

Alphansine Uwimana writes an order at Inzozi Nziza, or Sweet Dreams, Rwanda's first and only ice cream shop. There are logistical challenges, like power cuts, as well as cultural ones in a country where ice cream is not traditionally popular and women don't often run businesses.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:44 am

Rwanda has a warm climate, and the people love milk. You'd think ice cream would be an easy sell.

But mention ice cream to Chantal Kabatesi, and she rubs her jaw like she's at the dentist with a toothache. When she first tasted ice cream at the age of 35 "it was like eating hailstones," the kind that fall on her childhood village once or twice a year.

"I thought, 'Oh no, what are we serving to our customers? Is it dangerous?' " she said.

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Around the Nation
1:20 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

A Year After Bombings, Some Say 'Boston Strong' Has Gone Overboard

The phrase Boston Strong sprang up after last year's marathon bombings and is now ubiquitous around town. But some wonder if the commercialization of the slogan also trivializes the tragedy.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

The phrase Boston Strong emerged almost immediately after last year's marathon bombings as an unofficial motto of a city responding to tragedy. But now some are wondering whether the slogan is being overused.

The words are everywhere: Boston Strong is plastered on cars, cut into the grass at Fenway, tattooed on arms, bedazzled on sweatshirts and printed on T-shirts (and everything else).

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

GM To Take $1.3 Billion Charge Linked To Recall

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, last Wednesday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:19 pm

General Motors said on Thursday it will take a charge of $1.3 billion in the first quarter to cover its recall of more than 2 million vehicles, primarily for ignition switch problems.

The announcement comes on the same day that the Detroit automaker said it would need to make additional fixes to the ignition switch mechanism on some of the 2.2 million cars it has already recalled. GM also said it was suspending two engineers with pay in a disciplinary move related to the problem.

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The Salt
10:55 am
Thu April 10, 2014

No Plows, Cows, Sows: Not Your (Grand)Father's Youth Farm Group

Reece Melton, 18, of Longmont, Colo., is one of 580,000 FFA members across the country.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:38 am

A record number of kids are donning the blue corduroy jacket of FFA, formerly known as Future Farmers of America. The jacket is an icon of rural life — the organization is sort of like Boy Scouts for farming, and it dates back to the 1920s.

Even though fewer and fewer young people grow up on farms these days, the extracurricular activity is attracting more urban and suburban kids interested in food and agricultural science.

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Movie Interviews
10:55 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Nicolas Cage Trades Theatrics For Authenticity In 'Joe'

Nicolas Cage (left) and Tye Sheridan star in the film adaptation of Larry Brown's 1991 novel, Joe.
Ryan Green Courtesy of Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:18 am

A new movie makes an unlikely hero out of a violent and reclusive man. Set in small-town Texas, Joe is about a hard-working, hard-living ex-con — played by Nicolas Cage — who's trying to stay out of trouble. He finds that the best way to do that is to not get involved with people — until he meets a teenage boy, played by Tye Sheridan, in need of help.

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Parallels
10:43 am
Thu April 10, 2014

A Reporter Reflects On Rwanda: 'It's Like A Madness Took Over'

NPR's Jackie Northam reporting from Rwanda during the country's genocide in 1994.
NPR

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:54 am

There was a thin mist in the early morning air when we set off for the Rwandan capital, Kigali, on April 11, 1994. The genocide had begun four days earlier.

There were no flights into the country, so I and three fellow journalists crossed into Rwanda from neighboring Burundi, hitching a ride with a French priest who was shuttling Tutsi nuns out of the country. He took us to the town of Butare, where a Belgian inn keeper rented us an old cream-colored Renault and drew us a map of how to get to Kigali.

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Book Reviews
10:43 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Glossy As Film, This Handbook Was Made For The Multiplex

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:00 am

First, a confession: I've been a serial intern. Like so many other millennials, I've hopped from internship to internship, my wages often paid more in promises than recognized currency. And though my last internship — here at NPR Books — was one of the best things to happen to me (hi there, Boss!), it's safe to say that I carried into Shane Kuhn's new novel some preconceived notions. Even before I opened The Intern's Handbook, I knew that my review might need some sort of disclaimer. Consider this it.

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Justice: Albuquerque Police Show 'Pattern Of Excessive Force'

Riot police launch tear gas toward activists in downtown Albuquerque, N.M., last month following a 10-hour protest around the city, in response to a deadly police shooting.
Russell Contreras AP

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 12:10 pm

The Justice Department says it has found "patterns of excessive force" in the Albuquerque Police Department.

Justice said it found "reasonable cause to believe that APD engages in a pattern or practice of excessive force in violation of the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution."

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The Salt
10:11 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Arab Israeli Celebrity Chef Aims To Foster Peace Through Cooking

Microbiologist Nof Atamna-Ismaeel took the top prize in the fourth season of Israeli reality cooking show Master Chef.
Courtesy of Channel 2

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 9:25 am

Reality cooking shows have propelled many an aspiring chef to foodie stardom in the U.S. — Harold Dieterle, Jeff Mauro and Mike Isabella, to name a few.

But unlike her American counterparts, the most recent winner of Israel's Master Chef does not aspire to launch her own show or even open her own restaurant.

At first blush, the Arab Israeli cook Nof Atamna-Ismaeel has smaller ambitions: opening a Jewish-Arab cooking school. But her ultimate goal — to create common ground between Arab and Jewish Israelis — is anything but modest.

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