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The Two-Way
9:00 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Wire Fox Terrier Wins Best In Show At Westminster

Sky, a wire fox terrier, is shown here competing in the terrier group before winning best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show Tuesday.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 3:06 am

A wire fox terrier named Sky has become America's new top dog.

Sky won best in show at the 138th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on Tuesday, beating out dogs in six other groups, including a standard poodle, Portuguese water dog, bloodhound, Irish water spaniel, Cardigan Welsh corgi and a miniature pinscher.

It was the 14th time a wire fox terrier won best in show, more than any other breed since the Westminster show began in 1877.

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Politics
4:01 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

House Passes 'Clean' Debt Limit Bill

A woman looks at the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 31 in Washington.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:00 pm

Tuesday saw a rarity in Congress these days: a "clean" bill.

The House passed one to raise the debt limit, a move that avoids a possible default later this month.

In the past, House Republicans have used this debate to extract concessions from President Obama and congressional Democrats.

But not this time. House Republicans demanded nothing in return. The House passed the no-strings-attached debt hike Tuesday evening — though just 28 Republicans voted with the Democratic minority to pass the extension, 221 votes to 201 votes.

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Cabin Fever Playlist
4:00 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

A Little Love And Lots Of Music To Break Your Cabin Fever

Galina Barskaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:00 pm

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The Salt
3:59 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Thank You, Shirley Temple, For The Original 'Mocktail'

A Classic Shirley Temple
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:38 pm

Generations of little girls have watched the ebullient Shirley Temple light up Depression-era black and white films, her glossy curls bouncing and her voice chirping. Generations, too, developed a taste for the Shirley Temple drink — traditionally, ginger ale with a dash of grenadine, maraschino cherry and lemon for garnish.

The drink, it seems, has a shelf life as long as her movies.

That's because the saccharine beverage in a girly pinkish hue has long embodied glamour in a glass for tweens and the younger set.

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Budget Pruning Leaves Canadian Potted Plants Out To Dry

GCSurplus, the Canadian Government's site for the sale of surplus goods. Plants from the House of Commons may soon join them." href="/post/budget-pruning-leaves-canadian-potted-plants-out-dry" class="noexit lightbox">
Plants for auction on GCSurplus, the Canadian Government's site for the sale of surplus goods. Plants from the House of Commons may soon join them.
Courtesy of Public Works And Government Services Canada

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 3:50 pm

In Canada, even the ficus trees haven't been spared the budget cut hatchet.

The potted plants in Canada's House of Commons buildings, the CBC reports, will soon be rounded up and auctioned off as part of federal belt-tightening measures.

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Around the Nation
3:55 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Going To College May Cost You, But So Will Skipping It

A new study shows that the income gap between young adults who go to college and those who don't only continues to grow.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:00 pm

In America, total student loan debt tops $1 trillion and a four-year college degree can cost as much as a house — leaving many families wondering if college is really worth the cost.

Yes, a new study of young people finds. The study, released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center, looks at income and unemployment among young adults. Paul Taylor, executive vice president of special projects at Pew, says it's pretty much case closed when it comes to the benefits of going to college.

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Around the Nation
3:54 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Straw Buyers Exchange Vermont Guns For East Coast Drugs

An evidence locker at the Vermont field office of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is filled with confiscated guns.
Taylor Dobbs VPR

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:00 pm

In Vermont, opiate addiction is the high-profile focus of Gov. Peter Shumlin's latest set of policy initiatives. But the state's addiction problem has led to another dangerous issue:

Vermont's loose gun laws and a high demand for drugs make a lucrative market for drug dealers who accept guns in return for the drugs they sell.

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U.S.
2:16 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Nonprofits Pull In Investors To Tackle Housing Affordability

Melissa Conklin, 23, stands in the kitchen of her two-bedroom apartment at Woodmere Trace in Norfolk, Va. She earns about $30,000 a year at a nearby car dealership, and says these apartments are not only convenient, but affordable. She pays about $900 a month here, far less than other apartments in the area.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 9:56 am

One of the biggest problems facing low-income families in the U.S. today is a lack of affordable housing.

According to a recent report by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard, more than 7 million low-income households now spend more than half of their income for rent, which leaves little money for anything else. And the situation is expected to get worse.

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Shots - Health News
2:01 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Cervical Cancer Vaccine Also Helps Prevent Genital Warts

University of Miami pediatrician Judith Schaechter gives a girl an HPV vaccination in 2011.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:31 pm

The HPV vaccine was created to protect women against the virus that causes cervical cancer. But it also helps prevent genital warts, a common sexually transmitted disease caused by the same virus, a study finds.

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Code Switch
1:30 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

George Washington Carver, The Black History Monthiest Of Them All

The George Washington Carver National Monument in Diamond, Mo., was the first dedicated to a nonpresident.
John S. Stewart AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:43 am

Peanuts.

He did something, probably a lot of somethings, with peanuts.

That's basically the response I got when I asked people — my friends, folks on Twitter — what they knew about about George Washington Carver.

The details were hazy, but folks remembered that Carver was really important.

Oh, and something about Tuskegee! Wait, did he invent the peanut?

They half-remembered writing book reports about him in elementary school. And then a lot of them sheepishly acknowledged their ignorance.

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The Edge
1:29 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

PHOTO: Sochi Olympic Park As Seen From Space

A photo of Sochi's Olympic Park as seen from the International Space Station.
NASA

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:02 pm

The Johnson Space Center tweeted a view of the Olympics we haven't seen before. It's a view of Sochi's Olympic Park as seen by the astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

There's not much more to add, so we'll just leave you with the image:

Parallels
1:26 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Iran's President Marks Revolution With Call For Negotiations

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani delivers a speech during an annual rally commemorating the anniversary of the Islamic Revolution at the Azadi Square in Tehran, on Tuesday. Rouhani called for "respectful, constructive" nuclear talks with world powers — a departure from the hard line of his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 6:58 pm

Iran on Tuesday marked the 35th anniversary of its Islamic revolution, a day when the country's religious conservatives and military hard-liners take center stage, and calls of "Death to America" echo across the country.

In Tehran's Azadi Square, one man waving an orange "Down with the USA" flag condemned the U.S. and Israel, and then, perhaps not sure of the nationality of the reporter standing nearby, threw in England and France for good measure.

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Shots - Health News
12:47 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

In Illinois Deal, The Onion Will Promote Health Insurance (Really)

Would you buy health insurance from this man?
Get Covered Illinois

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 5:58 am

In a story that you'd think was ripped straight from the headlines of America's foremost made-up-news website, The Onion said it's coming up with ads to promote health insurance for young people in Illinois.

But it's true.

Get Covered Illinois, the state's health insurance exchange, has hired Onion Labs, The Onion's in-house ad team, to develop banner ads, a video and other online material to persuade people to sign up for insurance coverage.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Oscar-Nominated Documentary Looks At Prison Hospice

"Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall" tells the story of the final months in the life of a terminally ill prisoner. (HBO)

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:39 pm

Up for an Oscar in the “Best Documentary (Short Subject)” category next month is HBO’s “Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall.” The film looks at the hospice program at the Iowa State Penitentiary in Fort Madison, Iowa.

Funded by contributions and staffed by inmates, the hospice cares for prisoners serving life sentences whose health is failing.

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The Salt
12:33 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

After 23 Years, Your Waiter Is Ready For A Raise

A Denny's waitress delivers breakfast to customers in Emeryville, Calif. The tipped minimum wage has been stuck at $2.13 since 1991.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 1:21 pm

When Woody Harrelson's character got hired as a bartender on Cheers, he was so excited, he insisted on working for no more than the minimum wage. "I'd work like a slave," he said, "and, of course, I'd wash your car."

Most bar and restaurant workers would prefer to bring home a little more cash. They may be in luck.

As part of his plan to raise the minimum wage, President Obama has called for substantially increasing the base wage paid to tipped workers for the first time in decades.

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