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All Tech Considered
1:37 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Tech Week: Heartbleed, The Latest Bubble And Windows XP Retires

Each new billion-dollar IPO is raising the speculation that another tech bubble will soon burst.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:50 am

Site administrators were sent scrambling this week when researchers disclosed the potentially catastrophic Heartbleed bug, a coding error that left much of the Internet vulnerable to data theft since March 2012. Here's our look back at Heartbleed coverage — and more.

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This Week's Must Read
5:33 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Poisoned Cigars And A Painful Chapter In Our History

Courtesy of New Press

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 8:54 am

The 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act is almost upon us, but the celebrations began this week at the Johnson presidential library. A speech by President Obama referenced "doors of opportunity" swung open by the passage of this piece of landmark legislation. But for those of us who remember when the doors were tightly shut, other images come to mind. No, it's not the soft, grainy black-and-white images of well-dressed men and women marching nobly to end the evils of segregation. What we see is churches on fire, smoke and violence.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Millennials 'Talk To God,' But Fewer Rely On Religion, Survey Finds

Mormon missionaries walk through the halls at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah, in January 2013. A new survey by Carnegie Mellon University shows that more millennials report they "talk to God" than turn to religion for guidance.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 4:35 am

Barely half of millennials say they look to religion for guidance, but a higher percentage "talk to God," suggesting that the 18-to-34 demographic is more spiritual than sectarian, according to a new survey by the Integrated Innovation Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The survey of 2,000 U.S. men and women, ages 18-34, found that 62 percent said they talk to God, while 52 percent said they look to religion for guidance.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Obama Taxes Show Big Drop In Income, Charitable Giving

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama arrive at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on Friday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 4:15 pm

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama released their tax returns for 2013 on Friday. They show the couple saw a big drop in income and charitable giving.

They paid $98,169 in federal taxes on a $481,098 income. In 2012, their income was $608,611.

The AP reports:

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Shots - Health News
2:51 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Ebola Drug Could Be Ready For Human Testing Next Year

In this colored transmission electron micrograph, an infected cell (reddish brown) releases a single Ebola virus (the blue hook). As it exits, the virus takes along part of the host cell's membrane (pink, center), too. That deters the host's immune defenses from recognizing the virus as foreign.
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Science Source

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:13 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is terrifying because there's no drug to treat this often fatal disease. But the disease is so rare, there's no incentive for big pharmaceutical companies to develop a treatment.

Even so, some small companies, given government incentives, are stepping into that breach. The result: More than half a dozen ideas are being pursued actively.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
2:35 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

South Texas Oil Brings Boom — As Well As Pollution's 'Toxic Soup'

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:13 pm

While the South Texas oil boom has meant a flood of cash and people to formerly impoverished communities, there have also been serious repercussions — namely, rampant air pollution. Jim Morris of the Center for Public Integrity explains the boom's environmental effects.

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The Salt
2:33 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

The Latest Wacky Food Adventure: A Year Without Sugar

A new memoir highlights the experience of a family going without sugar for an entire year.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 12:26 pm

Why would anyone put her family of four through a radical food experiment that would deprive her children of Halloween candy and chocolate-chip cookies?

A cynic who happens upon Eve Schaub's recently published book, Year Of No Sugar, might say that banning sugar from your home for a year to document the effects on your family is no more than a gimmick veiled in a health halo, and a harsh one, at that. "This experiment was pretty much guaranteed to wreak all kinds of unpredictable havoc with our lives," Schaub admits early on in the memoir. "I loved it."

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Movie Reviews
2:32 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Big Names, High Production Values ... And These Are Indie Flicks?

Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton play some really hip vampires in Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive.
Sandro Kopp Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:13 pm

A small budget doesn't mean a film can't have big-name stars or high production values. Witness the rural Southern drama Joe, which brings Nicolas Cage back to indie films, and Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive, which turns the city of Detroit into an otherworldly landscape. Their low-budget aesthetic also allows these films to turn Hollywood conventions inside out.

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All Tech Considered
2:32 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 10:49 am

Many of Don Kluemper's management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive "friend" requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

"They didn't know why they were being friended," Kluemper says. "If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile."

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

NSA Denies It Knew About Heartbleed Bug Before It Was Made Public

The Heartbleed bug has exposed up to two-thirds of the Internet to a security vulnerability.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 4:34 am

The National Security Agency says it did not know about a critical security bug until it became public earlier this month.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Father-Son Team To Run One Last Boston Marathon

Rick and Dick Hoyt, Boston Marathon stalwarts since 1981, by the Hamilton Reservoir behind their home in Holland, Mass. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 11:57 am

Later this month is the 118th running of the Boston Marathon, and this year’s race is especially significant because it’s the first time it’s being run since last year’s bombing at the finish line. Because of that attack, two people will be taking part in this year’s Boston Marathon who hadn’t intended to be there: Dick and Rick Hoyt.

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The Two-Way
2:31 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Total Eclipse Of The Moon Next Week Throughout North America

The moon seen from Manila, Philippines, during a total lunar eclipse in December 2012, as the Earth casts a shadow across the face of our nearest celestial neighbor.
Bullit Marquez AP

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 4:34 am

If you're willing to stay up late and the skies are clear early next week, you can catch the first total lunar eclipse in more than three years that's visible throughout North America.

The total eclipse, the first visible throughout the U.S. since December 2012, will peak at about 3 a.m. EDT.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
2:31 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 10:34 pm

Today Cotulla, Texas, is reaping the benefits of an oil and natural gas boom in the Eagle Ford Shale. But in 1928, the South Texas town was incredibly poor — and that's how Lyndon Johnson saw it when he had his first job there at age 20.

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The Salt
12:54 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Pass The Chipotle-Marrow Matzo Balls, It's Mexican Passover

Pozole soup Jalisco-style with chipotle-marrow matzo balls.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:27 am

The typical American Seder meal served on the first night of Passover tends to be hearty, comforting and pretty bland. But it doesn't have to be.

At Rosa Mexicano, a New York-based chain of upscale Mexican restaurants, tried and true dishes like matzo ball soup and beef brisket are getting a spicy makeover this year for its 12th annual Mexican Passover week.

Wait, you may be saying. Mexican Passover? There are Jews in Mexico? Actually, yes, although the country is 97 percent Catholic.

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Shots - Health News
11:19 am
Fri April 11, 2014

How A Person Can Recover From Ebola

Testing for Ebola, a scientist in a mobile lab at Gueckedou, Guinea, separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate the virus's genetic sequence.
Misha Hussain Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 12:38 pm

At least eight Ebola patients in Guinea have beaten the odds. They have recovered and been sent home. In past outbreaks, the death rate has been as high as 90 percent. In Guinea so far, about 60 percent of the 157 suspected cases have ended in death.

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