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Theater
2:54 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Deepwater, Center-Stage: Disaster Through Survivors' Eyes

Gary Barthelmy, Oyster Fisherman is a portrait by Reeva Wortel, used in conjunction with the production of Spill, a play that runs through March 30 at the Swine Palace in Baton Rouge.
Reeva Wortel

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:50 pm

Eleven died and hundreds of millions of gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico when BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010. But beneath the tragedy, there's a complex story about people's relationships to oil. That's what's explored in Spill, a new play by one of the creators of The Laramie Project.

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Shots - Health News
2:54 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Young People Are Falling Into A Health Insurance Subsidy Gap

Ashante Thurston, John Riascos and Julieth Riascos talk with Mario Ricart, a private insurance agent, about buying health insurance at a kiosk at the Mall of the Americas in Miami last year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:50 pm

Some young people seeking to buy health insurance are finding themselves falling into a subsidy gap that leaves them ineligible for financial assistance that was heavily advertised.

Subsidies in the health law were designed to lower insurance costs for people who make around $11,000 to $46,000 a year.

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Study: The Chicken Didn't Cross The Pacific To South America

A Filipino chicken vendor in Quezon City, east of Manila, Philippines. Researchers say Pacific island chicken are genetically similar to the variety found in the Philippines, but different from South American chicken.
Rolex Dela Pena EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:07 pm

An analysis of DNA from chicken bones collected in the South Pacific appears to dispel a long-held theory that the ubiquitous bird first arrived in South America aboard an ancient Polynesian seafarer's ocean-going outrigger.

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Krulwich Wonders...
2:02 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

Booklist American Library Association

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:38 pm

This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That's what happened here — but this is a true story.

It's about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue ...

... just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland.

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Shots - Health News
1:57 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Teens Say They Don't Text Or Drink While Driving

I'm not really texting. I'm checking my homework assignments.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:03 am

Many teen drivers are earnest when they say they know the risks of drinking and driving or texting behind the wheel. But it seems many either ignore those dangers or don't fully understand what it means to drive safely.

About half of teens who say they never text while driving admitted to texting at red lights or stop signs, according to a survey released Tuesday. And while 86 percent of teens consider driving under the influence to be dangerous, one in 10 who say they never drive under the influence actually do drive after drinking.

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Report: NSA Can Record, Store Phone Conversations Of Whole Countries

Nicolas Armer DPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:17 pm

The United States has the capability to record "100 percent" of a country's phone calls, The Washington Post reports today citing people "with direct knowledge" and documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

According to the paper, the U.S. keeps those recordings for a month. The paper adds:

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The Salt
11:41 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Thank Your Gut Bacteria For Making Chocolate Healthful

Bacteria in your gut can break down the antioxidants in chocolate into smaller, anti-inflammatory compounds.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:50 am

Boy, it's a good time to be a dark-chocolate lover.

We've noted before the growing evidence that a daily dose of the bitter bean may help reduce blood pressure. There also seems to be a link between a regular chocolate habit and lower body weight.

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It's All Politics
11:41 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Top Democrat Insists Party Will Hold Senate — But Turnout Is Key

Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz speaks to party members during their meeting last summer in Scottsdale, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:00 pm

As increasingly confident Republican leaders predict big midterm election gains, the head of Democratic National Committee put on her game face Tuesday and insisted the party will hold control of the Senate.

The Democrats' grass-roots organization, said Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and what she characterized as the GOP's continuing alienation of women, minority, LGBT and middle-class voters, bodes well for her party this fall.

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The Protojournalist
10:45 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Kids Think The Darndest Thoughts

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 8:13 am

When you were growing up, did you believe something that you later learned — as an adult — wasn't true?

We tossed that question to the Internet and answers came flooding in – more than 7,000. (Thank you all.) Turns out, many people had endlessly entertaining thoughts as children.

Certain ideas popped up over and over: Teachers live at school. Quicksand will swallow me up. Factory smoke stacks are cloud-making machines.

Perhaps misconception – like misery – loves company.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:37 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Pitch Perfect: 3 Must-Hear Vocal Albums

A late 15th-century icon of St. Sergius of Radonezh with the Saints of Rostov adorns the cover of a new album of Russian Orthodox Church music by the vocal ensemble Conspirare.
Harmonia Mundi

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 9:47 am

The human voice, the true original instrument, is still the most expressive and personal of all. It's one reason more than 42.5 million Americans sing in choirs, and why we seem to be hardwired to tell our stories through song. It also probably explains why I'm a vocal music junkie, eagerly pawing over the operas, recitals and choir albums that land on my desk and in my download folder.

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Parallels
10:36 am
Tue March 18, 2014

After 300 Years Of Marriage, Scotland Contemplates U.K. Divorce

Pro-independence campaigners attend a rally In Edinburgh, Scotland, in September.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:22 am

Scotland has been part of the United Kingdom for more than 300 years. This fall, that could change. In mid-September, a referendum on independence will determine whether Scotland breaks off from England, Northern Ireland and Wales to become a sovereign nation.

Scotland's largest city, Glasgow, is ground zero in this debate. The East End of this city is poor and run down, with some of the worst health figures in Europe. Men here are expected to live into only their mid-50s, some 30 years less than in wealthy areas.

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Shots - Health News
10:36 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Despite Setbacks, Bipartisan Support Remains For Colorado Exchange

Patty Fontneau, executive director and CEO, of Connect for Health Colorado, acknowledged there were problems with the exchange when it opened.
Eric Whitney for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:56 am

Being the first to try something can be rewarding. Remember how amazing it was to have the first iPhone? But then, sometimes there's a downside, like using that early version of the iPhone map tool that led to some wrong turns.

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Space
10:35 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Space Thief Or Hero? One Man's Quest To Reawaken An Old Friend

Early days: NASA's International Sun-Earth Explorer C (also known as ISEE-3 and ICE) was undergoing testing and evaluation inside the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber when this photo was snapped in 1976.
NASA

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:56 pm

More than 30 years ago, Robert Farquhar stole a spacecraft.

Now he's trying to give it back.

The green satellite, covered with solar panels, is hurtling back toward the general vicinity of Earth, after nearly three decades of traveling in a large, looping orbit around the sun.

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All Tech Considered
10:35 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Weekly Innovation: Paper Notebooks That Become Digital Files

Mod Notebooks sell for $25 each, which includes a prepaid envelope and digitization.
Courtesy of Mod Notebooks

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 9:14 am

Each week, we highlight an innovation you might not have heard of yet. This week's innovation is a twist on something invented thousands of years ago: paper.

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Paying For College
10:34 am
Tue March 18, 2014

How The Cost Of College Went From Affordable To Sky-High

World War II veterans and other students at the University of Iowa in 1947. That year, due to federal assistance from the GI Bill, 60 percent of the school's enrollment was made up of veterans.
Margaret Bourke-White Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 10:59 am

If you want to get an earful about paying for college, listen to parents from states where tuition and fees have skyrocketed in the last five years. In Arizona, for example, parents have seen a 77 percent increase in costs. In Georgia, it's 75 percent, and in Washington state, 70 percent.

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