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Goats and Soda
11:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes

Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 2:15 pm

A few weeks ago, we took a look at nonverbal greetings around the world. In Japan, they bow. Ethiopian men touch shoulders. And some in the Democratic Republic of the Congo do a type of head knock.

But the American fist bump stood apart from the rest.

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Chances Are Pretty Good That's A Bill Collector Calling

According to the Urban Institute report, the typical adult in trouble with bill collectors has a median debt of $1,350.
DNY59 iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 11:43 am

In about one-third of U.S. households, the sound of a phone or doorbell ringing may trigger a desire to duck.

That's because roughly 77 million adults with a credit file have at least one debt in the collection process, according to a study released by the Urban Institute, a research group. A credit file includes all of the raw data that a credit bureau can use to rank a borrower's creditworthiness.

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Shots - Health News
11:15 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Report Says Big Changes Are Needed In How Doctors Are Trained

Proposed changes in medical training would shift money away from big teaching hospitals to clinics.
Erikona/iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 12:38 pm

The way American doctors are trained needs to be overhauled, an expert panel recommended Tuesday, saying the current $15 billion system is failing to produce the medical workforce the nation needs.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Tue July 29, 2014

This One Is Worth Watching: New Zealand Retirees Join 'Happy' Meme

Senior citizens dance to "Happy."
YouTube

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 1:35 pm

At this point, you've surely decided that you've watched more than enough Internet remakes of Pharrell's infectious anthem to felicity, "Happy."

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Middle East
10:16 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Two Years, He Smuggled Photos Of Torture Victims Out Of Syria

This is one of the some 55,000 images the former Syrian military police photographer known as Caesar smuggled out of the country between 2011 and 2013. The regime used numbers — written on white cards and sometimes directly on the skin — to identify the dead, which branch of the Syrian government had held them, and when they died.
Courtesy of Syrian Emergency Task Force

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 12:01 pm

Warning: This report contains descriptions and an image that could disturb some readers.

The savage and protracted conflict in Syria has left more than 170,000 dead. Now, there are allegations of torture and killing of political prisoners opposed to the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Those allegations appear to be supported by evidence: tens of thousands of photographs.

The man who says he took the pictures worked as a military police photographer for the Assad regime and defected last year.

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The Salt
9:38 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Could Specialty Cocoa Be Haiti's Golden Ticket To Prosperity?

Maman Pye cacao, a Haitian supertree, can produce 20 times as many cacao pods as ordinary trees, and the pods themselves are denser with cacao seeds than ordinary pods.
Shutterstock

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:50 am

In Robillard, a tiny hamlet deep in the Haitian hinterland, Valmir Mamonvil is standing next to a would-be national hero: Maman Pye cacao, which in Haitian Creole means "mother cacao tree." His father planted it 30 years ago, but for Mamonvil, the tree is more than a family heirloom. It could be his kids' ticket to prosperity — and his country's chance to cash in on surging chocolate demand around the world.

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Shots - Health News
9:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Medicare's Costs Stabilize, But Its Problems Are Far From Fixed

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 5:12 pm

Medicare's Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which finances about half of the health program for seniors and the disabled, won't run out of money until 2030, the program's trustees said Monday. That's four years later than projected last year, and 13 years later than projected the year before the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Tue July 29, 2014

NCAA Reaches $75 Million Settlement In Head-Injury Lawsuit

Penn State running back Evan Royster eludes a tackle by Eastern Illinois' Adrian Arrington during a 2009 NCAA college football game in State College, Pa. Arrington was one of the athletes who sued the NCAA over concussions.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:40 am

The NCAA has reached a settlement with former athletes that provides $75 million for medical monitoring and research into head injuries. The settlement also calls for a change in the way schools handle head trauma.

As USA Today explains, the NCAA currently requires that member schools only have a concussion management plan. The settlement would require schools to make changes to their policies and "institute return-to-play guidelines."

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Shots - Health News
9:24 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Getting Hospice Care Shouldn't Have To Mean Giving Up

Patients who get the comforts of palliative care as well as disease treatment live longer, studies show, than those who only get treatment for the disease.
Annette Birkenfeld iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 11:31 am

It's a painful dilemma for seriously ill Medicare patients: To receive the extra support, counseling and care provided by the program's hospice benefit, they have to agree to stop receiving curative treatment for their disease.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, lives in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza. The plight of the "sad bear" has spawned more than 400,000 signatures on a petition to get him moved to a "better life" in Canada.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 10:55 am

Despite a public outcry that resulted in more than a half-million petition signatures and a personal appeal by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Arturo, Argentina's "sad bear," has been deemed too old to migrate to Canada.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:10 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Who Is Most To Blame For Climate Change?

Flooding in a cemetery on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands in December 2008.
Giff Johnson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 9:42 am

Here in southeastern Virginia, our biggest city, Norfolk, is saddled with an unwanted claim to fame. As The Washington Post has reported, Norfolk is the place "where normal tides have risen 1.5 feet over the past century and the sea is rising faster than anywhere else on the East Coast."

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Shots - Health News
9:55 am
Thu July 24, 2014

When Federal Privacy Laws Protect Hospitals Instead Of Patients

ProPublica

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 8:50 am

In the name of patient privacy, a security guard at a hospital in Springfield, Mo., threatened a mother with jail for trying to take a photograph of her own son.

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The Two-Way
9:30 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Wreckage Of Air Algerie Flight With 116 Aboard Found In Mali

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 7:21 pm

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET.

The Air Algerie MD-83 en route from the capital of Burkina Faso to Algiers with 116 passengers and crew aboard has been found with no survivors.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, reporting for our Newscast team, that a presidential aide in neighboring Burkina Faso says the remains of the missing aircraft have been found just across the border in Mali, in an isolated area about 60 miles south of the town of Gao.

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Shots - Health News
9:49 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Federal Health Exchange Stays Busy After Open Enrollment Ends

Even after the open enrollment deadline, HealthCare.gov remained a popular destination.
J. David Ake AP

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 1:52 pm

For months, journalists and politicians fixated on the number of people signing up for health insurance through the federal exchange created as part of the Affordable Care Act. It turned out that more than 5 million people signed up using HealthCare.gov by April 19.

But perhaps more surprising is that, according to federal data released Wednesday to ProPublica, there have been nearly 1 million transactions on the exchange since then. People are allowed to sign up and switch plans after certain life events, such as job changes, moves, the birth of a baby, marriages and divorces.

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Other News
1:05 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Inslee Says Feds Will Help Restore Power In Fire Zone

Map of current large fire locations in the Northwest

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:42 pm

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said Tuesday President Obama has pledged immediate federal aid to help fire-swept areas of north central Washington.

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