Environment
5:49 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

Hanford sets record for groundwater treatment in November

Tanks filled with an ion exchange resin inside the 100-HX groundwater treatment facility. Photo courtesy Dept. of Energy

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 2:41 pm

RICHLAND, Wash. – The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is treating more contaminated groundwater than ever before. In November alone, pumping stations at the southeast Washington site churned out a record 100 million gallons of treated groundwater. That could fill more than 150 Olympic-size swimming pools.

Deep beneath Hanford there are massive plumes of contaminated groundwater inching toward the Columbia River. The plumes carry toxic stuff like radioactive contamination and hexavalent chromium.

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The Arts
4:00 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

Seattle creates theater district

Seattle's Moore Theatre is one of five venues included in the newly designated Downtown Historic Theater District.
Kevin Cease Flickr

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn has signed a resolution designating a Downtown Historic Theatre District.

The resolution, unanimously approved by the Seattle City Council, supports the preservation, promotion and maintenance of five historic venues: The 5th Avenue TheatreThe Paramount Theatre, The Moore Theatre, ACT – A Contemporary Theatre and Town Hall Seattle.

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Clean Air Act
3:42 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

Federal ruling could force state to work harder to regulate oil refineries

A big ruling in a federal suit brought against the state aims to force more regulation of one of the biggest sources of air pollution: oil refineries.

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Science
10:19 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Native Americans lost half of population in European conquest, new research shows

A new study used the DNA from Native American women in North and South America to show the indigenous population decreased by about half in the centuries following European contact.
miracc Flickr photo

A new study is shedding some light on a long-debated question about Native Americans. Just how much smaller was the indigenous population in North and South America after the European conquest? 

Clues can be found in DNA, according to research conducted at the University of Washington and University of Goettingen in Germany. 

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Holiday spirit
9:57 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Diamond ring dropped in Spokane Salvation Army kettle

Moved by the holiday spirit, someone put a $5,000 ring in a Salvation Army red kettle.
Evan P. Cordes Flickr

SPOKANE, Wash. — An anonymous donor dropped a diamond ring wrapped in a dollar bill in a Salvation Army red kettle in the Spokane area.

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Environment
9:45 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Jordan Cove : Decision On Gas Export License Could Come This Week (script)

The boom in natural gas drilling in the U.S. has led a handful of companies to propose liquefying the gas for export. one project in Oregon could be close to a decision on its export license.

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Park rules
9:30 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Vancouver, Wash., council bans tobacco in city parks

The freedom to smoke no longer includes parks in Vancouver, Wash.
Simen Svale Skogsrud Flickr

VANCOUVER, Wash. — The Vancouver City Council voted Monday to ban tobacco from city parks and recreation centers.

The council heard from at least one speaker who called the ban a form of discrimination.

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Law
9:07 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Novice rustlers may have shot Woodland cattle

WOODLAND, Wash. — Woodland rancher Bob Smith says he's selling off the 25 cattle remaining in his herd because of recent attacks that may be the work of novice rustlers.

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Budget crisis
9:04 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Washington parks face emergency budget cuts

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington’s state park system is facing an emergency funding crisis. The Parks Commission will meet Tuesday to vote on a plan to immediately cut $11 million from the budget.

The crisis comes as sales of the new Discover Pass lag.

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Books
4:30 am
Tue December 6, 2011

Gerry Hadden covers his years as an NPR foreign correspondent

Central American migrants wait for nightfall just south of the U.S. border outside Sasabe, Mexico.
Gerry Hadden

Any dedicated public radio listener has probably wondered what it's like to be a foreign correspondent for NPR. Reporter Gerry Hadden gives us a glimpse into that world in his memoir, Never the Hope Itself.

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