Environment
3:37 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Idaho couple puts wetlands rules to the test in U.S. Supreme Court

Chantell and Mike Sackett say the EPA violated their right to due process when it said they were building a house on a wetland and ordered them to restore the land.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

PRIEST RIVER, Idaho – A fight over less than an acre of land in a remote part of the Northwest could alter the way the government enforces environmental regulations across the country.

The U.S. Supreme Court this winter will hear a case brought against the EPA by Mike and Chantell Sackett of north Idaho.

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Global Health
2:46 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Head of Seattle's PATH heading over to Gates Foundation

Chris Elias, head of Seattle-based PATH, announced today that he is leaving, after a decade, to take over as head of the global development program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read more on Humanosphere.

All Hallows' Eve
2:07 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Halloween myth that won't stay dead: Razors and poisons in treats!

In the 1980s, fruit and other unwrapped food disappeared from the Halloween trick or treat landscape because of the urban myth that they could contain razors or poisons.
Loren Javier Flickr

Back in the early '80s, when Blondie's "Call Me," Dire Straits' "Money for Nothing" and "Every Breath You Take" by the Police were topping the charts, the urban myth of razor-blade apples and poisoned candy paralyzed parents of would-be trick-or-treaters.

And if you are still worried, at least one hospital in the state will X-ray your candy for you!

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The Impact of War
1:03 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

One Cold War Era Hanford Worker Remembers His Days On the Site

James Bresina, 64, remembers working on the Hanford Nuclear site during the Cold War. Photo by Anna King.

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 5:31 pm

RICHLAND, Wash. — Sunday is the National Day of Remembrance honoring Cold War nuclear workers. In the Tri-Cities, Washington, dozens of the people who worked at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation to help make plutonium for bombs gathered Friday. Correspondent Anna King met James Bresina , and she has this audio postcard about his time on the nuclear site.

When I started out there I was what they call a 'youth opportunity trainee.' I made $1.25 and hour for my wages.

My name is James Bresina, and I worked at Hanford from 1966 to 1995. It was very secretive. Very tense.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Halloween is more funny than scary in St. Louis

At Washington University in St. Louis on Sunday, student Andrew Dwoskin was handing out candy to local children during a "Safe Trick-or-Treat" event.

Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 10:01 am

Being a comedian, Joe Marlotti is always afraid he won't get laughs. But he grows especially nervous this time of year. After all, a comedian doesn't want his kids to bomb when it comes time to tell jokes.

Marlotti hails from St. Louis, where local Halloween tradition calls for children not to say "trick or treat," but to tell a joke in order to earn candy.

"I've been all around the block — literally — telling them that it's important to tell the joke right, or it makes me look bad," Marlotti says.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Boeing to build new spacecraft in old shuttle hangar

Boeing released this artist's rendering of its planned CST-100 which can carry a crew of seven.

Boeing ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 10:41 am

There's a new private spacecraft in development to fly astronauts to the International Space Station and its maker, Boeing, has decided to build it in Florida. Boeing is leasing an old shuttle hangar from the Kennedy Space Center to construct the Crew Space Transportation-100 vehicle, or the CST. The facility has to be refurbished and staff hired, and Boeing says if it continues to win government contracts for the vehicle, the CST-100 will make its first test flights by the end of 2015.

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Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Talk of the Nation, Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Earshot Jazz Festival
11:25 am
Mon October 31, 2011

The Bad Plus ‘rocked!’ at Earshot Jazz as festival continues

The Bad Plus rocked the house during Earshot Jazz Festival.

The Bad Plus aren’t the kind of trio that swings, you’re much more likely to hear after-show comments like “That rocked!” or “Those guys are epic!”

Playing songs mostly from their upcoming as-yet-untitled new album, the trio used all of the acoustic advantages of Seattle’s Town Hall – having no problem filling the room with at-times pounding piano-bass-n-drums, at times so quiet as to have all of us in the audience holding our breath.

Read the full review on Groove Notes.

All Hallows' Eve
9:09 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Old Port Townsend hotels known for ghosts

Guests and visitors to the Palace Hotel in Port Townsend, WA have claimed to either see or sense the presence of "The Blue Lady" since the 1960s.
studio-d Flickr

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash. — A couple of historic hotels in Port Townsend may give visitors more than a pleasant night's sleep.

The Peninsula Daily News reports some guests say they are haunted by ghosts.

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Other News
9:01 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Tests on mastodon bone vindicate WSU prof

This CT scan image shows a section of mastodon rib where researchers found a spear point lodged in the bone. The spear would have passed through more than 10 inches of hide, tissue and muscle.
Center for the Study of the First Americans

Modern tests have vindicated the theory of a now-retired Washington State University professor who found a mastodon bone in Sequim in 1977 with a shaft sticking in it.

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