Books
7:52 am
Sun January 22, 2012

'Cultural Revolution Cookbook': A taste of humanity

Braised Pork In Soy
Melisa Goh NPR

Originally published on Sun January 22, 2012 3:33 am

From about 1966 to 1976, China's leader Mao Zedong enforced a brutal agenda. Everything was rationed during the Cultural Revolution. Millions of people were forced out of the cities and into the countryside, where food was even scarcer. The government controlled people's movements, their livelihoods, even their thoughts.

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National Security
7:50 am
Sun January 22, 2012

CIA Tracks Public Information For The Private Eye

A student paints the Facebook logo on a mural commemorating Egypt's revolution last spring. The team from the CIA's Open Source Center monitors social media activity overseas.
Manoocher Deghati AP

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 6:24 am

Secrets: the currency of spies around the world.

The rise of social media, hash-tags, forums, blogs and online news sites has revealed a new kind of secret — those hiding in plain sight. The CIA calls all this information "open source" material, and it's changing the way America's top spy agency does business.

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Rachel Martin is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Middle East
9:57 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Wins In Landslide

Egyptian women show their ink-stained fingers after voting at a polling station earlier this month. According to the election results, less than 2 percent of parliamentarians will be female.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 6:27 am

The final results for Egypt's parliamentary elections are in, and while there are no surprises, the Muslim Brotherhood exceeded expectations by capturing 47 percent of the vote.

The final election results were read out Saturday with little ceremony, but the final tally cemented what most people in Egypt already know: Islamist groups are the new political powerhouse in post-revolutionary Egypt.

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

It's All Politics
9:56 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

'Dirty' Politics As Usual In South?

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 2:27 pm

  • 1988: The Willie Horton Ad
  • 2008: McCain's 'Bill Ayers' Anti-Obama Ad
  • Robo-Call: Newt's Baggage
  • Robo-Call: Santorum Supports Romney

South Carolinians are voting today in the GOP primary, which some pundits see as the candidates' last stand for getting the GOP nomination to run in the general election.

On weekends on All Things Considered today, host Guy Raz talked with Danielle Vinson, the chair of the political science department at Furman University in Greenville, S.C., about what is often considered "dirty" South Carolina primary politics.

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Presidential Race
9:55 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

After Gingrich 'Slam Dunk,' GOP Battle Intensifies

Gingrich supporters celebrate his win at a rally in Columbia, S.C.
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:05 am

Newt Gingrich's win in South Carolina was big enough to ensure that the Republican primary season will remain competitive for weeks to come.

But even in the immediate aftermath of the former House speaker's 12 percentage point victory over Mitt Romney, analysts were asking whether Gingrich's newfound momentum would be enough to sustain a serious challenge.

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It's All Politics
9:54 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

Herman Cain Gets 'A Colbert Bump' In South Carolina

Former GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain waves at a rally the College of Charleston on January 20, 2012. Comedian Stephen Colbert held the event with Cain, titled "Rock Me Like a Herman Cain South Cain-olina Primary Rally", as part of his pseudo-run for president of "The United States of South Carolina."
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 12:01 pm

Herman Cain suspended his bid for the GOP presidential nominee back in December, but that's not stopping him from picking up votes in South Carolina's primary.

Could his mini surge of one percent of the vote be thanks to a late-breaking endorsement by Comedy Central comedian Stephen Colbert?

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Simon Says
10:07 am
Sat January 21, 2012

Should the 'leap second' be abolished? Could you repeat that?

Every few years, official clocks around the world repeat a second. It's not much, but in an age of atomic clocks, it's time enough to give the matter a second thought.
Uwe Merkel iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 6:57 am

Let me take a second here.

Not very long, was it?

But a second tied up delegates to the UN's International Telecommunication Union, who postponed a decision this week on whether to abolish the extra second that's added to clocks every few years to compensate for the earth's natural doddering.

The earth slows down slightly as we spin through space. No one falls off, but earthquakes and tides routinely slow the earth by a fraction of a fraction of a second, which makes clocks minutely wrong. If not corrected, it could make a minute of difference a century.

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Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

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