Education
8:19 am
Fri August 6, 2010

High Anxiety at Colleges Over Federal Funds

University of Washington students on campus, February 2010.
AP Photo

High anxiety is coursing through public colleges and universities these days. Federal funds for programs that serve first-generation college goers and minority students are on hold.

College counselors know it as the tipping point', that period between a student's first and second year, when drop out rates historically increase.

"When I entered college I was this shy little kid."

Corbin Sonneman will start his second year at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom next month. He credits the school's Student Support Services program with helping him stay in school.

Read more
Legal Marijuana
5:00 am
Wed July 23, 2014

New FBI Head In Seattle Encounters Pot Smokers Near Office

While marijuana is legal in Washington, it remains illegal under federal law.

So a recent encounter in front of the Federal Bureau of Investigation offices in Seattle proved a little awkward for the new special agent in charge of the Seattle division.

Read more
Life Reinvented
5:00 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Four Years After A Life-Changing Tragedy, A Pilot Meets His Rescuers

Lance Leone embraces one of his rescuers.
Ed Ronco KPLU

In a thick Pacific fog, James Island completely disappears from view. But it sits just a few hundred yards from La Push, a small community on the outer edge of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Even with the landmark obscured by heavy gray, Lt. Lance Leone can point to where it all happened. The power lines extended out this way. The helicopter broke apart in mid-air right here. The cockpit hit the water over there.

Of the four on board, Leone was the only survivor of the crash. Four years later to the day, he returned to meet the people who saved him, and to tell them how the crash changed his life and ended his Coast Guard career.

Read more
Food for Thought
5:00 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Fun With Making Your Own Banh Mi Viet Subs And The Pickles, Too

Nancy's pickled snap peas variation on a recipe in Andrea Nguyen's cookbook
Nancy Leson

I'm a recent though enthusiastic consumer of banh mi and a longtime fan of Andrea Nguyen's superb cookbooks. Her newest, "The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches," was just released.

That subtitle is no overstatement.  If you're unfamiliar with banh mi (bunn mee) Viet sub sandwiches, it's time to try one. And what better way to get started than to make your own with the easy to follow instructions in Andrea's handbook. 

Read more
Oso Slide
4:34 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Scientists Say Smaller 2006 Landslide Set The Stage For Oso Disaster

The 2014 Oso slide "remobilized" the zone of a smaller slide from 2006.
WSDOT

A small landslide in 2006 set the stage for the catastrophe that claimed 43 lives in Oso, Washington this past March, say a panel of scientists in a federally-funded study.

The hills above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River had slid before, at least 15 times over the centuries, according to the study.

But one slide in particular left Oso vulnerable. In 2006, that smaller slide left a loosely-packed mass of debris perched dangerously above the Steelhead Haven development and its neighbors.

Read more
Youth & Education
4:30 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Report Faults Seattle Schools For 'Lack Of Urgency' In Serving Most Vulnerable Students

Students listen to their teacher in a special education classroom in Florida.
Lynne Sladky AP Photo

Seattle Public Schools' efforts to educate students with disabilities of all sorts are "in need of urgent, substantial and significant improvement," according to a scathing report released Tuesday, faulting district staff from the administrative offices all the way down to individual schools.

The report itself was commissioned by the district office's special education team as part of an effort to correct, as the authors call it, "an obvious and chronic lack... of urgency" around special education — and to bring Seattle Public Schools back in the good graces of both state officials and of federal law.

Read more
Studio Sessions
4:06 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Welcoming Home Sara Gazarek

Sara Gazarek performing live in the KPLU Seattle studios.
Justin Steyer KPLU

Listen to the full interview and performance

We were very excited to welcome back singer/songwriter, Sara Gazarek, a graduate from the Roosevelt High School jazz program who has since made a home in the L.A. jazz scene. 

Sara stopped by the KPLU Seattle studios for this interview and performance while in town at Jazz Alley with Band members Josh Nelson (piano), Hamilton Price (bass), Zach Harmon (drums) and Larry Koonse (guitar).

Wildfire Danger
10:57 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Fire Evacuees Find Help With Donation Centers, Shelters

Volunteers hang cardboard signs to point people in the direction of donation centers and shelters.
Courtney Flatt

The Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department ordered more homeowners to evacuate Monday afternoon after firefighters saw a brief relief from high winds and hot weather Sunday.

Donations are coming in by the truckload to the Pateros High School in central Washington. Piles of clothes hip-deep fill the gym. Stacks of food, water and pet food line the hallways.

Read more
Fish Consumption Rate
5:00 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Wash. To Host First Public Meeting On Inslee's Fish Consumption Rate Proposal

How much fish we eat — or the government's recorded assumption about our consumption — is one factor in an equation that determines how much water pollution industries are allowed to discharge.

Washington is slowly moving ahead with a long-delayed plan to update its water quality rules. Tuesday's will be the first public meeting on Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposal to dramatically increase the fish consumption rate, which determines how clean discharged water must be. But some say the proposal doesn’t go far enough.

Read more
Eating Bugs
5:00 am
Tue July 22, 2014

5 Reasons Eating Bugs Could Save The World, According To Seattle's Own 'Bug Chef'

Here's a deep-fried tarantula.
Chugrad McAndrews of Seattle "The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook," published by Ten Speed Press.

Seattle author David George Gordon would be more than happy to share his recipe for his three bee salad or cricket nymph risotto. Try the deep-fried tarantula, the bloomin’ onion of arachnids.

Gordon is known as “the bug chef,” and has written one of the more comprehensive cookbooks showcasing bugs and their kin. He is also a true believer in insects as a food source for an ever-hungrier planet, as laid out in a lengthy U.N. report last year.

Read more

Pages