News

Pages

Jazz Northwest
3:00 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

More Earshot Previews With John Gilbreath On Jazz Northwest

Lew Tabackin Trio
Howard A. Gitelson

The Earshot Jazz Festival started last weekend and will continue through November 11 with dozens of performances in various venues around Seattle. Earshot director John Gilbreath joins Jim Wilke on KPLU's Jazz Northwest  to provide some highlights from a dizzying array of world class talent appearing during the Earshot Jazz Festival.  Highlighted on this program are performances by Lew Tabackin, Chad Mccullough, Miguel Zenon, Pharoah Sanders, Davie Liebman and Anton Schwartz. 

Read more
BirdNote
9:00 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Waterfowl Migration In Flux

Credit Teddy Llovet & Aaron Maizlish

  Waterfowl such as this Greater White-fronted Goose have long followed a predictable schedule, flying south in autumn after breeding in the north. But for some birds, climate change may be delaying fall migration. Beginning in 1979, scientists in northern Europe recorded migration dates of geese and ducks during a period of 30 years. The data revealed six species that delayed southward migration. The reasons are complex, but a general trend of delayed fall migration will make waterfowl conservation increasingly challenging.

BirdNote
9:00 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Chorus Line In The Sky

Credit Bob Stevens

  A flock of small shorebirds (like these Western Sandpipers) twists and turns, glittering in the sky. When threatened by a falcon, these birds take to the air, flying so close together that it's hard for a predator to capture one. A bird at one edge turns toward the middle, and a wave sweeps across the entire flock in less than a second.

Read more
Paid Sick Leave
2:32 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Seattle City Auditor: No More Kid Gloves For Violators Of Sick Leave Ordinance

Seattle's auditor said it's time to step up enforcement of an ordinance requiring businesses to offer paid sick leave to workers.
Sean MacEntee Flickr

A city department has enforced Seattle’s mandatory sick leave ordinance mainly by sending violators a polite letter. Now the city auditor says it’s time to get tougher.

Seattle’s Office of Civil Rights used a pretty light touch during the first year of requiring businesses to provide paid sick leave for workers. The department would typically respond after a worker complained, sending the employer a “non-adversarial letter.”

Read more
Weather with Cliff Mass
10:39 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Mass: Enjoy The Mild Weekend Before The 'Real Wet Stuff' Returns Next Week

Tim Durkan

This weekend will start off wet and cloudy, but the rain will give way to milder conditions, says KPLU weather expert Cliff Mass.

Mass says things will steadily improve over the weekend, with each day a bit better than the last.

Read more
Taking The Plunge
10:09 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Chilly Water No Deterrent To Growing Numbers Of 'Wild Swimmers'

Swimmers enter the water for a mid-October, one-mile "excursion" at Alki Beach in Seattle.
Tom Banse

More swimmers in the Northwest are trading the comfort of the pool for a workout in open water.

The English call these people "wild swimmers." It seems an appropriate description when you consider the chilly temperature of most Northwest lakes, rivers and bays. And yet the popularity of open-water swimming is rising.

Read more
Investment
9:44 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Wash. State's Exotic Investment Opens On Tahitian Island Once Owned By Brando

The Washington State Investment Board is a majority owner of the company that owns a resort on a Tahitian island once owned by Marlon Brando.
Wikimedia

A new luxury resort has opened on a Tahitian island once owned by Marlon Brando and it could soon start to pay a dividend to Washington state’s retired public employees.

That’s because the Washington State Investment Board is a majority owner of the company that owns the resort.

Read more
BirdNote
9:00 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Great Missoula Flood - Scablands And Plunge Pools

Credit Moo Moo Savaloy

  During the last ice age, a lobe of the ice sheet covering western Canada dammed the Clark Fork River, creating a vast lake in what is now northwestern Montana. Several times during the past 15,000 years, the ice dam broke, sending hundreds of cubic miles of water roaring across the inland Northwest and down the Columbia River Gorge. It left 100-ton boulders scattered across the land, gorges 1000 feet deep, and enormous potholes. Now on a quiet, sunny October day, Mallards (like this female), pintails, and Gadwalls bathe and preen in a pool created by one of the greatest floods the Earth has ever known.

Sports with Art Thiel
5:00 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Can UW's 'Mad Scientist' Help Huskies Break 10-Year Losing Spell Against Oregon?

UW coach Chris Petersen on the sidelines of the Huskies' game against California, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014.
Ben Margot AP Photo

The unranked Washington Huskies take on the No. 9 Oregon Ducks Saturday in Eugene. The Ducks are heavily favored to win, as they have the past 10 years.

But the Huskies may be able to turn their luck around this year with the help of a man known as “the mad scientist.”

Read more
Environment
10:07 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

EPA Orders Navy To Fix Gorst Creek Landfill

The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered the U.S. Navy to reroute a creek and clean up a decades-old dump in Kitsap County.

The EPA says contamination from the Gorst Creek Landfill is posing risks to public health and salmon habitat.

Read more
Ebola
4:09 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Ebola Makes West Africa A No-Go Zone For Washington Investment Officers

FILE - This undated photo made available by the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, shows the Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope.
AP Photo/Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa means Washington state investment officers won’t be traveling to that region anytime soon.

Read more
Environment
3:48 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Methow Valley Irrigation Gets Overhaul For Salmon, Steelhead, Bull Trout

Methow River
myriverguide.com Flickr

Construction begins this week on a state project in the Methow Valley to give fish a boost of cold, clean water in rivers near Twisp, Washington. The state and a trout conservation group are pouring about $10 million into a whole new irrigation system there.

Read more
Weather with Cliff Mass
2:35 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Got A Question About The Weather? Ask Cliff Mass

"Old Seattle proverb: If you don't like the weather, just wait 30 minutes."
Tim Durkan

Find yourself wondering about a certain weather pattern or phenomenon? Ask KPLU weather expert Cliff Mass. 

Every Friday, Mass chats with KPLU's environment reporter Bellamy Pailthorp about the weekend weather and the science behind it.

Read more
Gun Initiative
10:25 am
Thu October 16, 2014

Rural Farmers On I-594: Make Your Gun Laws, But We Won’t Abide

From left to right, Ben and Frank Wolf are brothers who farm together in the Palouse in southeast Washington.
Anna King

In rural parts of the Northwest, many believe owning a gun is sort of like owning a garden trowel. You just have one or two around.

In November, Washington voters will decide on two gun-related initiatives. Initiative 594 aims to close loopholes on gun sales without background checks. The initiative is likely to pass, according to a recent poll. But in rural Washington, some people are skeptical the initiative will hit its intended target.

Read more
Hanford Nuclear Reservation
9:51 am
Thu October 16, 2014

EPA Fines Hanford For Stagnating Radioactive Waste Near Columbia River

The K-East and K-West reactors were shut down in 1970 and 1971.
U.S. Department of Energy

The Environmental Protection Agency intends to fine the U.S. Department of Energy up to $10,000 per week if radioactive waste just a stone's throw from the Columbia River isn’t cleaned up.

Behind the old called the K-West reactor at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is a huge concrete swimming pool-like basin. It was built in the 1950s and meant to last for 20 years. That’s where workers dumped hot irradiated rods until they cooled. Later, they were shuttled off to be further refined into plutonium for bombs.

Read more

Pages