News

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The Seattle Sounders kick off their 2015 season Sunday night. They host the New England Revolution at 6:30 at CenturyLink Field.

The Major League Soccer season begins with a brand new contract between the league and its players’ union.

Note: Each month, KPLU invites a teen guest DJ to play his or her favorite pieces on the air.  The program is part of KPLU's School of Jazz.

Puget Sound Community School's Margaux Bouchegnies is the Student DJ for the month of March.  Margaux's hour will air from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. on March 5.  

Justin Steyer

Song List: 

  1. "Feeling Good"
  2. "The Music Is The Magic"
  3. "I Love Being Here With You"

Lynne Arriale (piano), Carla Cook (vocals) and Grace Kelly (saxophone) are all headline jazz artists who lead their own bands.  Not long ago, though, these three extremely talented players decided it would be fun to get together and pay tribute to the musicians and the songs that initially inspired them to pursue a life in jazz.

Study Highlights Washington's Gender Wage Gap

Mar 4, 2015
Ted S. Warren / AP Images

The year 2071 is when the state's gender wage gap is projected to close if things continue as they are.  

A new study commissioned by the Women's Funding Alliance shows that more immediate change would not only close the gender wage gap, but also boost the state's economy.

The study says there has been some progress.  Women here are more likely to earn a college degree than they were 20 years ago.  Voter turnout rates are higher for Washington women than in the nation as a whole, and the gender wage gap has narrowed since the 1950s. 

Nancy Leson

I've never been able to make Italian potato Gnocchi (NYOH-kee).  I admitted my secret shame to Nancy Leson in this week's Food for Thought. "I just end up with this soggy, waterlogged mess.  They almost dissolve.  Where am I goin' wrong, here?"  Nancy's answer was a question.

Lansing Wild Birds Unlimited

Some birds are born with the ability to sing. Others learn to sing while they're young — just like humans, who must learn to speak.

It turns out that vocal learning in songbirds and humans may have more in common than anyone suspected. Recent DNA research reveals that songbirds and humans share a set of roughly 50 genes that appear crucial to vocal learning.

And it's possible that because scientists now understand the genetic similarities between speech and birdsong learning, they can use that insight to study human speech acquisition in new ways.  

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

March 2 is the birthday of Theodor Geisel, better known to readers everywhere as Dr. Seuss. He would have turned 111 this year.

KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Ed Ronco remembered the children's author during Monday's Morning Edition ... in full Seussian rhyme.

BirdNote: An Avian Big Bang

Mar 2, 2015
Johnx1 - FreakingNews.com

Many scientists believe that the demise of the dinosaurs began when an asteroid struck the earth 66 million years ago. Some dinosaurs survived, and among them were the early ancestors of birds.

Recently an international research team sequenced the genomes of 45 birds of diverse lineages. The results revealed a surprising discovery: the common ancestor of today’s birds — among them warblers, parrots, woodpeckers, falcons, and owls — was a top-of-the-food-chain carnivore!

This "bird," however, is a flight of fancy, courtesy of FreakingNews.com.  

A federal court will hear oral arguments Monday in Seattle, in a case that pits the United States against the State of Washington. It has to do with who gets to take how much fish.

U.S. District Judge Ricardo S. Martinez has set aside 3 weeks in his calendar to hear issues involved.

Three tribes are mentioned in the current litigation: the Makah, the Quileute and the Quinault Indian Nations. They’re fighting with each other.

Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times

She may be an accomplished public speaker, but Bellevue teacher Kristin Leong says she's still "secretly super introverted." Getting comfortable with public performance, she tells her students, is about "faking it 'til you make it."

But Leong says she starts every year in her middle school humanities classes at the International School in Bellevue with the same promise to her students: 'all of them will be performers this year.'

Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times

Editor's note: Andrea Soroko teaches English at Seattle's Garfield High School. This post has been adapted from a story she told during a recent Seattle Times storytelling event, "Why I Teach." The Seattle Times' Education Lab project put on the event in partnership with KPLU and the UW College of Education. The names of the students Soroko mentions have been changed.

I have a student named "Johnny."

"Johnny" does well in school. "Johnny" completes his homework on time. "Johnny" is a good football player. My student, "Johnny," has a dream. It's a dream many of us share — the American Dream. He dreams of a family, a house, a car. The world is his oyster and Johnny is not afraid to dream big.

Worker rights advocates say it’s great that Washington is considering raising the minimum wage and that several cities have already passed higher wage and paid sick leave laws.

But they say it’s important to make sure such measures are enforced. That’s why a union local is teaming up with the University of Washington School of Law.

Jim Levitt

There's lots of current music to listen to and talk about on Jazz Northwest this week.   Ingrid Jensen and Steve Treseler head an all-star Quintet at The Royal Room where they'll record a show for NPR, Dee Daniels is Artistic Director at the DeMiero Jazz Festival in Edmonds next week, Thomas Marriott has a great new video and there's much more.  

Greg Lavaty

The small, nondescript Pied-billed Grebe has an astonishing talent. The grebe is the master of its own buoyancy.

It can squeeze out both the air trapped in its feathers and in its internal air-sacs and sink effortlessly. Learn more about the amazing, sinking Pied-billed Grebe at Cornell's AllAboutBirds. 

How To Make A Mini Zine

Feb 28, 2015

In this week's episode of Sound Effect, KPLU's Arwen Nicks spoke with poet Amanda Laughtland about her poetry zines and small press, Teeny Tiny. 

Watch Arwen demonstrate how to create a mini zine out of a single sheet of paper.

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