News

Pages

BirdNote
9:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Snail Kite - Bird Of The Everglades

Credit Aida Villaronga

  When Florida became a state in 1845, the legislature declared the Everglades, America's largest wetland, totally worthless. In 1905, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward was elected governor on a campaign to drain them. So over the years, the slowly flowing "River of Grass" has been replaced by a series of reservoirs with little water movement. The endangered Snail Kite feeds only on the Apple Snail. And neither kites nor snails flourish in places that are permanently under water. Learn more at StateOfTheBirds.org.

History
8:01 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Cross-Time Photos Show Snapshots Of Seattle's Past And Present, Side By Side

"A lot of cities across America had "Hoovervilles," shanty towns that sprang up after the Great Depression hit. Seattle was no exception."
Courtesy of Clayton Kauzlaric

If Seattle's streets could talk, they’re likely to tell you the stories depicted in Clayton Kauzlaric’s photos.

Kauzlaric uses Photoshop to juxtapose archival photos with modern-day images of the same location.

Take, for instance, the stretch of Alaskan Way that houses the ferry terminal on Seattle’s waterfront. These days, it’s an unremarkable place where a McDonald’s sign greets passersby. But it has quite a history — it’s also the same place Japanese residents were made to board trains headed to internment camps back in 1942.

Read the full story on our companion site, Quirksee.org >>>

Charitable Giving
5:01 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Seattle Nonprofit Veteran Says Push To Cut 'Overhead' Starves Charities

Longtime PATH executive Eric Walker says overhead is often necessary for a healthy organization.
Courtesy of PATH

If you’re a shareholder in a company, you probably want that business to run as efficiently as possible. Lately it’s gotten easier to apply that mentality to nonprofit charities, too, with online rating sites that score charities on how much of your gift goes directly to the mission, and, in some cases, call out organizations with high overhead.

It sounds like a smart way to give, but Eric Walker says it’s a troubling trend.

“Wouldn’t that be a good thing if 99 cents of my dollar went to the soup in the soup kitchen?” Walker asked. “The problem is there's a whole bunch of work to put that soup in the pot and get it to the soup kitchen that there’s nobody to pay for.”

Read more
How Teens See Race
5:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

In Light Of Ferguson, Students Of Seattle's Least White High School Talk About Race

Rainier Beach High School students watch a video about Emmett Till, who was 14 when he was murdered in Mississippi in 1955, as part of a discussion of this summer's demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

This summer's events in Ferguson, Missouri aren't the only things that make Jaedyn Colly, who is black, wonder what makes him different from the police. 

"I have family members — they've been arrested," said Colly, a sophomore at Rainier Beach High School. "You just question, 'What is the difference? What makes [a police officer] so better than me? What gives you the power to have control over me?'"

It's the kind of frustration Rainier Beach High teachers want to bring out into the open. Just ten days into their young school year, they've already carved out half-hour blocks over three days to discuss the police shooting of the unarmed black teenager Michael Brown and the racially-charged demonstrations that followed.

Read more
Going Places
5:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Don't Panic If You Lose Your Credit Card While Traveling

FILE - In this photo taken on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2009 tourists gather in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome.
Alessandra Tarantino AP Photo

Credit cards are essential travel tools for many. But they’re also targets for thieves and also easy to lose. KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley says the most important thing is not to panic. 

Read more
Marijuana License
5:06 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Wash. State: Dozens Of Pot-Shop Applications In Jeopardy

A pamphlet titled "Marijuana Use in Washington State," is displayed Monday, July 7, 2014, at the Cannabis City recreational marijuana shop in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP Photo

Washington state is warning dozens of people who applied to run legal marijuana shops that their chance of getting a license is in jeopardy.

The Liquor Control Board on Wednesday began sending letters to 56 businesses. The board says they scored lucky numbers in lotteries conducted in April, putting them in a good position to win a coveted marijuana retail license, but they haven't moved forward with their applications since then.

Read more
Space Travel
3:10 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Bezos' Company Blue Origin Chosen To Build NASA's Rocket

FILE - This photo released by Blue Origin shows the development vehicle Goddard being moved back into the barn in remote Culberson County in West Texas, after a test flight on Nov. 13, 2006.
AP Photo/Blue Origin

The U.S. has been wanting to ferry astronauts from U.S. soil to the International Space Station, but for now, American astronauts rely on Russia to get to space. That’s about to change, now that Boeing and Blue Origin, another Northwest company, are on board to build the rocket.

Read more
Unemployment
12:08 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

With Jobless Rate Holding Steady, 2014 On Track To Be 'Best Statewide Since 2005'

FILE - In this March 1, 2011 photo, Mariam Bario, recently relocated to Seattle from Kenya, fills out an application with others at a job fair, in SeaTac, Washington.
Elaine Thompson AP Photo

Washington state’s unemployment rate held steady at 5.6 percent in August — a half-percentage point below the national rate, according to a report released Wednesday by the state’s Employment Security Department.

State labor economist Paul Turek said improving economic conditions bode well for job seekers going into fall.

Read more
Preserving History
10:24 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Federal Grants To Help Preserve History Of WWII Japanese Internment Sites

Five men playing board game in barracks at the Kooskia Internment Camp. ca. 1944.
University of Idaho Digital Initiatives

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, U.S. government officials rounded up Japanese Americans and sent them to harsh, ill-equipped camps. Now, the National Park Service has announced $3 million in new grants to help preserve that important history.

Stacey Camp, an associate professor at the University of Idaho, is leading an effort to survey the Kooskia Internment site with help from federal Park Service grants.

Read more
BirdNote
9:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Nighttime Flights Of Songbirds

Credit Composite image by Bob King

  Some cloudless night in September, when the air is clear, you may see birds flying across the yellow face of the moon! September is peak migration time for millions of songbirds heading south from North America to more tropical latitudes. Nocturnal migrants of the same species, such as orioles, warblers, sparrows, and tanagers, call as they fly, enabling flock-mates to stick together. Many of these flight calls are distinctive, enabling those with an excellent ear to identify them as they pass.

Food for Thought
5:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Wok This Way — Not Nancy Leson's Way, Says Stein

Still life with curry paste
Nancy leson

Nancy Leson keeps a lot of stuff on hand to do what she characterizes as stir-frying. These techniques include first searing meat on the grill rather than in the wok. Tut-tut.

She also uses "stir-fry" as a noun, as in "my favorite stir-fry." I am left with no choice but to remonstrate.

Read more
News Jokes
5:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

'Wait Wait' Host Peter Sagal Talks Comedy, News And What It's Like To Run In Seattle

"Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!" host Peter Sagal
Alain McLaughlin for NPR

The popular NPR news quiz "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" is coming to Seattle's Paramount Theatre on Thursday. On the weekly game show, a panel of comedians and writers crack wise about the news. The show also features celebrity guests taking the  quiz — everyone from actors and comedians to Supreme Court justices. (This week, it's travel expert Rick Steves.) KPLU spoke with "Wait Wait..." host Peter Sagal about the news, comedy and even a famous incident involving that animated paperclip from Microsoft.

Read more
Infectious Diseases
4:30 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Suspected Enterovirus Outbreak Widens In Northwest

Jenny Ingram Flickr

Public health authorities in Washington and Idaho are now investigating at least 79 cases of a serious respiratory illness that affects children.

The widening disease outbreak is suspected — but not confirmed — to be enterovirus D68, a rare strain of the virus.

Read more
Space Travel
1:21 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

NASA Picks Boeing And SpaceX To Ferry Astronauts

In this undated image provided by NASA, astronaut Randy Bresnik prepares to enter The Boeing Company's CST-100 spacecraft for a fit check evaluation at the company's Houston Product Support Center.
AP Photo/NASA

NASA is a giant step closer to launching Americans again from U.S. soil.

On Tuesday, the space agency announced it has picked Boeing and SpaceX to transport astronauts to the International Space Station in the next few years.

Read more
Politics
9:58 am
Tue September 16, 2014

PACs Face Quirk In Washington Law Before They Can Spend Money

File photo of Tom Steyer
Steve Helber AP Photo

California billionaire Tom Steyer is poised to help Democrats try to win back control of the Washington Senate. But first, his NextGen political action committee had to satisfy a quirk in the law.

Call it the ten-ten rule. In Washington, political committees have to jump a small hurdle before they can play in Washington’s political sandbox. The rule is the committee must receive $10 or more from at least 10 registered Washington voters. Now that NextGen has this bit of local skin in the game, climate activist Tom Steyer is free to start spending some serious on Washington races.

Read more

Pages