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Environment
5:47 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Proposed Emergency Legislation Aims To Address Starfish Wasting Syndrome

A sick ochre star.
Courtesy of Drew Harvell

Most people who've grown up in the Northwest can remember walking on the beach as a kid, enjoying tide pools full of brightly-colored starfish. But beachcombing has become less joyful over the past year. An epidemic known as sea star wasting syndrome has devastated huge populations of starfish, especially on the West Coast.

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Legal Marijuana
5:39 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Wash. Marijuana Tax Collections Starting To Roll In, Millions More Expected

This July 1, 2014, photo shows packets of a variety of recreational marijuana named "Space Needle" during packaging operations at Sea of Green Farms in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP Photo

In a manner of speaking, millions of dollars of "drug money" are starting to flow into Washington state coffers.

The state's chief economic forecaster updated budget writers Thursday on how much tax money they can expect from recreational marijuana now that the first state licensed stores have opened.

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Northwest Salmon
5:11 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Chinook Salmon Head Up The Columbia In Big Numbers

Retired Hanford pipe fitter Melvin Miller, 60, was fishing early for Chinook salmon on the Columbia River near Columbia Point Marina in Richland, Washington.
Anna King

Fisheries experts say the return of chinook salmon to the Columbia River may not quite break records this fall as expected.

Last year’s run of nearly 1.3 million salmon was a record, but future years may not bring those kinds of numbers.

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World Population
2:49 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

UW Researchers Forecast More Crowded Planet, Warn Population Could Hit 11 Billion

World population could hit 11 billion by the year 2100.
NASA

The planet could be much more crowded by the end of the century than previously thought, according to a new report by University of Washington researchers.

That contradicts a general consensus that world population growth is likely to stabilize before long. The population has been expected to rise from the current seven billion or so to about nine billion, before leveling off and possibly declining.

But new projections, based on new statistical models, suggest the numbers will not tail off after all. Instead, statistician and sociologist Adrian Raftery said we could hit 11 billion and counting by century’s end.

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Jazz Caliente
12:00 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

A Unique Musical Blend: Pablo Menendez And Mezcla, Direct From Cuba

Pablo Menéndez and Mezcla
B. Leyva

Guitarist Pablo Menéndez takes fusion to the next level.  His band Mezcla (meaning "mixture") blends jazz, blues, rock and several styles of Cuban and African music into one raucous, joyous expression of life.

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BirdNote
9:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Snail Kite - Bird Of The Everglades

Credit Aida Villaronga

  When Florida became a state in 1845, the legislature declared the Everglades, America's largest wetland, totally worthless. In 1905, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward was elected governor on a campaign to drain them. So over the years, the slowly flowing "River of Grass" has been replaced by a series of reservoirs with little water movement. The endangered Snail Kite feeds only on the Apple Snail. And neither kites nor snails flourish in places that are permanently under water. Learn more at StateOfTheBirds.org.

History
8:01 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Cross-Time Photos Show Snapshots Of Seattle's Past And Present, Side By Side

"A lot of cities across America had "Hoovervilles," shanty towns that sprang up after the Great Depression hit. Seattle was no exception."
Courtesy of Clayton Kauzlaric

If Seattle's streets could talk, they’re likely to tell you the stories depicted in Clayton Kauzlaric’s photos.

Kauzlaric uses Photoshop to juxtapose archival photos with modern-day images of the same location.

Take, for instance, the stretch of Alaskan Way that houses the ferry terminal on Seattle’s waterfront. These days, it’s an unremarkable place where a McDonald’s sign greets passersby. But it has quite a history — it’s also the same place Japanese residents were made to board trains headed to internment camps back in 1942.

Read the full story on our companion site, Quirksee.org >>>

Charitable Giving
5:01 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Seattle Nonprofit Veteran Says Push To Cut 'Overhead' Starves Charities

File image
401(K) 2012 Flickr

If you’re a shareholder in a company, you probably want that business to run as efficiently as possible. Lately it’s gotten easier to apply that mentality to nonprofit charities, too, with online rating sites that score charities on how much of your gift goes directly to the mission, and, in some cases, call out organizations with high overhead.

It sounds like a smart way to give, but Eric Walker says it’s a troubling trend.

“Wouldn’t that be a good thing if 99 cents of my dollar went to the soup in the soup kitchen?” Walker asked. “The problem is there's a whole bunch of work to put that soup in the pot and get it to the soup kitchen that there’s nobody to pay for.”

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How Teens See Race
5:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

In Light Of Ferguson, Students Of Seattle's Least White High School Talk About Race

Rainier Beach High School students watch a video about Emmett Till, who was 14 when he was murdered in Mississippi in 1955, as part of a discussion of this summer's demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

This summer's events in Ferguson, Missouri aren't the only things that make Jaedyn Colly, who is black, wonder what makes him different from the police. 

"I have family members — they've been arrested," said Colly, a sophomore at Rainier Beach High School. "You just question, 'What is the difference? What makes [a police officer] so better than me? What gives you the power to have control over me?'"

It's the kind of frustration Rainier Beach High teachers want to bring out into the open. Just ten days into their young school year, they've already carved out half-hour blocks over three days to discuss the police shooting of the unarmed black teenager Michael Brown and the racially-charged demonstrations that followed.

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Going Places
5:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Don't Panic If You Lose Your Credit Card While Traveling

FILE - In this photo taken on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2009 tourists gather in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome.
Alessandra Tarantino AP Photo

Credit cards are essential travel tools for many. But they’re also targets for thieves and also easy to lose. KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley says the most important thing is not to panic. 

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Marijuana License
5:06 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Wash. State: Dozens Of Pot-Shop Applications In Jeopardy

A pamphlet titled "Marijuana Use in Washington State," is displayed Monday, July 7, 2014, at the Cannabis City recreational marijuana shop in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP Photo

Washington state is warning dozens of people who applied to run legal marijuana shops that their chance of getting a license is in jeopardy.

The Liquor Control Board on Wednesday began sending letters to 56 businesses. The board says they scored lucky numbers in lotteries conducted in April, putting them in a good position to win a coveted marijuana retail license, but they haven't moved forward with their applications since then.

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Space Travel
3:10 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Bezos' Company Blue Origin Chosen To Build NASA's Rocket

FILE - This photo released by Blue Origin shows the development vehicle Goddard being moved back into the barn in remote Culberson County in West Texas, after a test flight on Nov. 13, 2006.
AP Photo/Blue Origin

The U.S. has been wanting to ferry astronauts from U.S. soil to the International Space Station, but for now, American astronauts rely on Russia to get to space. That’s about to change, now that Boeing and Blue Origin, another Northwest company, are on board to build the rocket.

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Unemployment
12:08 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

With Jobless Rate Holding Steady, 2014 On Track To Be 'Best Statewide Since 2005'

FILE - In this March 1, 2011 photo, Mariam Bario, recently relocated to Seattle from Kenya, fills out an application with others at a job fair, in SeaTac, Washington.
Elaine Thompson AP Photo

Washington state’s unemployment rate held steady at 5.6 percent in August — a half-percentage point below the national rate, according to a report released Wednesday by the state’s Employment Security Department.

State labor economist Paul Turek said improving economic conditions bode well for job seekers going into fall.

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Preserving History
10:24 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Federal Grants To Help Preserve History Of WWII Japanese Internment Sites

Five men playing board game in barracks at the Kooskia Internment Camp. ca. 1944.
University of Idaho Digital Initiatives

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, U.S. government officials rounded up Japanese Americans and sent them to harsh, ill-equipped camps. Now, the National Park Service has announced $3 million in new grants to help preserve that important history.

Stacey Camp, an associate professor at the University of Idaho, is leading an effort to survey the Kooskia Internment site with help from federal Park Service grants.

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BirdNote
9:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Nighttime Flights Of Songbirds

Credit Composite image by Bob King

  Some cloudless night in September, when the air is clear, you may see birds flying across the yellow face of the moon! September is peak migration time for millions of songbirds heading south from North America to more tropical latitudes. Nocturnal migrants of the same species, such as orioles, warblers, sparrows, and tanagers, call as they fly, enabling flock-mates to stick together. Many of these flight calls are distinctive, enabling those with an excellent ear to identify them as they pass.

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