robots http://www.kplu.org en Robot Baristas? Here's Starbucks CEO Schultz's Take http://www.kplu.org/post/robot-baristas-heres-starbucks-ceo-schultzs-take <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The coffee world has been abuzz lately with news of barista robots—machines that can custom-make a cappuccino or </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">chai</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> latte. Naturally, the question becomes whether the world’s largest coffee chain, Seattle-based Starbucks, would replace humans with automation.&nbsp;</span></p> Mon, 02 Dec 2013 13:01:00 +0000 Ashley Gross 11318 at http://www.kplu.org Robot Baristas? Here's Starbucks CEO Schultz's Take Underwater robots evolve, teach us about nature http://www.kplu.org/post/underwater-robots-evolve-teach-us-about-nature <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Robots are everywhere these days. They’re working in factories, and are the focus of student competitions. They are also teaching us about nature, especially in the case of robotic fish.</span></p><p>It might seem a little Hollywood to talk about "robo-fish." And as an engineering professor, <a href="http://www.aa.washington.edu/research/ndcl/underwaterVehicle.html#uvGallery" target="_top">Kristi Morgansen</a> is a little shy about that.</p><p>“We usually call them fish robots, or robotic fish,” she said.</p> Tue, 18 Jun 2013 11:57:00 +0000 Keith Seinfeld 9086 at http://www.kplu.org Underwater robots evolve, teach us about nature 'Sort of' alive: Researchers probe how kids think about robots http://www.kplu.org/post/sort-alive-researchers-probe-how-kids-think-about-robots <p>One way young kids learn to organize the world is by dividing it into living and non-living things. But now that robots vacuum our floors and smart phones talk back to us, do children think of technology as alive? A team of Washington researchers is exploring how kids interact with robots, and what that might reveal about both their brains and ours.</p><p> Mon, 17 Jun 2013 12:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 9073 at http://www.kplu.org 'Sort of' alive: Researchers probe how kids think about robots