Science http://www.kplu.org en UW Researchers: Tiny-Brained Fruit Flies Are Top Gun Fliers http://www.kplu.org/post/uw-researchers-tiny-brained-fruit-flies-are-top-gun-fliers <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">New research out of the University of Washington shows that an insect with a brain smaller than a salt grain can take complex evasive action in flight. The findings could have value for engineers.</span></p><p>Consider the fruit fly,&nbsp;Drosophila melanogaster. It’s — actually, wait. You really should click this soundtrack before you read any further.</p><p></p> Fri, 18 Apr 2014 12:00:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 16106 at http://www.kplu.org UW Researchers: Tiny-Brained Fruit Flies Are Top Gun Fliers Seattle-Area Skygazers May See Glimpse Of 'Blood Moon' — If They're Persistent http://www.kplu.org/post/seattle-area-skygazers-may-see-glimpse-blood-moon-if-theyre-persistent <p>The Puget Sound region won’t be the best place to take in the lunar eclipse in the wee hours of Tuesday morning. High clouds are likely to obscure the so-called “blood moon,” which flushes reddish in the shadow of the Earth.</p><p>University of Washington atmospheric scientist Cliff Mass says the northwest Washington coast might fare better. And cloud breaks might give even Seattle-area moon-gazers a glimpse — if they keep looking. &nbsp;</p> Mon, 14 Apr 2014 22:12:55 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 16020 at http://www.kplu.org Seattle-Area Skygazers May See Glimpse Of 'Blood Moon' — If They're Persistent UW Team Invents Gesture Recognition Technology That Pulls Power From Thin Air http://www.kplu.org/post/uw-team-invents-gesture-recognition-technology-pulls-power-thin-air <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A University of Washington research team has developed technology that could let people control devices with hand gestures. And the sensor doesn’t use battery power; it pulls electricity out of thin air.</span></p><p>Technology to read hand gestures already exists in devices like Microsoft’s Kinect. But most of it uses cameras or beams, which make it expensive and hungry for electricity.</p> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 23:01:11 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 14291 at http://www.kplu.org UW Team Invents Gesture Recognition Technology That Pulls Power From Thin Air Losing Voice To ALS, Kent Man Recording All He'll Ever Want To Say http://www.kplu.org/post/losing-voice-als-kent-man-recording-all-hell-ever-want-say <p style="margin-bottom: 1.3em; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; line-height: 21px;">It's hard to imagine a more devastating diagnosis than ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease. For most people, it means their nervous system is going to deteriorate until their body is completely immobile. That also means they'll lose their ability to speak.</p> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 22:04:23 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 14081 at http://www.kplu.org Losing Voice To ALS, Kent Man Recording All He'll Ever Want To Say Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain http://www.kplu.org/post/orphans-lonely-beginnings-reveal-how-parents-shape-childs-brain Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development.<p>More than a decade of research on children raised in institutions shows that "neglect is awful for the brain," says <a href="http://dms.hms.harvard.edu/neuroscience/fac/Nelson.php">Charles Nelson</a>, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. Mon, 24 Feb 2014 17:05:02 +0000 Jon Hamilton 14017 at http://www.kplu.org Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain Seattle Scientists: Supplements Thought To Protect Against Cancer Increase Risk http://www.kplu.org/post/seattle-scientists-supplements-thought-protect-against-cancer-increase-risk <p>Two nutrient supplements once thought to protect against cancer may actually increase the risk of prostate cancer, <a href="http://www.fhcrc.org/en/news/center-news/2014/02/vitamin-e-selenium-prostate-cancer-risk.html">according to a study </a>led by researchers at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.</p><p>The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study looked at 4,856 men taking large doses of vitamin E and selenium, either alone or together, or a placebo.</p><p> Sat, 22 Feb 2014 00:18:44 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 13967 at http://www.kplu.org Seattle Scientists: Supplements Thought To Protect Against Cancer Increase Risk Did UW Researchers Back The Right Horse In One Of Physics' Hottest Questions? http://www.kplu.org/post/did-uw-researchers-back-right-horse-one-physics-hottest-questions <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Think of the immense amount of stuff in the cosmos: stars, planets, interstellar dust and clusters of galaxies. Now consider this: all that stuff is probably only about one-sixth of the matter in the universe.</span></p><p>The rest is thought to be a mysterious invisible substance called dark matter — something scientists have been hunting for decades. Now an unexpected turn of events has put a low-key research team in Seattle right at the center of the dark matter search.</p><p> Thu, 30 Jan 2014 13:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 13036 at http://www.kplu.org Did UW Researchers Back The Right Horse In One Of Physics' Hottest Questions? 10 Hours Of Brain Training Keeps Elderly Sharper Even 10 Years Later, Study Finds http://www.kplu.org/post/10-hours-brain-training-keeps-elderly-sharper-even-10-years-later-study-finds <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Scientists have long known that brain training can help older adults stay sharp, but </span><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.12607/abstract" style="line-height: 1.5;" target="_blank">a new study </a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">co-authored by a Seattle scientist shows those benefits also have remarkable staying power.</span></p><p>The advantages from just a little bit of training — about 10 total hours — can last at least a full decade, according to a large national study called the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly, or ACTIVE study.&nbsp;</p><p> Tue, 14 Jan 2014 01:07:13 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 12550 at http://www.kplu.org 10 Hours Of Brain Training Keeps Elderly Sharper Even 10 Years Later, Study Finds NFL Money Will Fund Seattle Doctor's Concussion Research http://www.kplu.org/post/nfl-money-will-fund-seattle-doctors-concussion-research <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The National Football League is paying for a Seattle scientist to study head injuries in student athletes, testing a solution to the problem of how to diagnose and measure concussions.</span></p><p>With all the focus on sports and head trauma lately, it may come as a surprise that medicine actually doesn’t have great ways to measure common brain injuries. They don’t usually show up on brain scans, even though we know they can cause serious and lasting neurological problems.</p><p> Thu, 02 Jan 2014 13:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11972 at http://www.kplu.org NFL Money Will Fund Seattle Doctor's Concussion Research Seattle Scientists Look To Make Drug Research More Like Fantasy Football http://www.kplu.org/post/seattle-scientists-look-make-drug-research-more-fantasy-football <p><em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15.454545021057129px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 21.988636016845703px;">Editor's Note: This is the second installment of a two-part series. Learn how scorpion vemon led local researchers to the brink of discovery of a new class of drugs in <a href="http://kplu.org/post/how-scorpions-sting-led-seattle-scientists-brink-discovery">Part 1</a>.</em></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Consider the chemical elegance of a potato. Or a petunia. Or a horseshoe crab.</span></p><p>Somewhere in each of those organisms is a special little protein uniquely equipped to do what medicines do: barge in on biological processes and mess with them. With a little tweaking, it’s possible they could be trained to, say, keep cancer cells from spreading.</p><p>A few years ago, Dr. Jim Olson and his team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center had figured out how to make those proteins by the thousands, but they hadn’t yet figured out how to pay for it.</p><p> Wed, 18 Dec 2013 13:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11819 at http://www.kplu.org Seattle Scientists Look To Make Drug Research More Like Fantasy Football How A Scorpion's Sting Led Seattle Scientists To The Brink Of Discovery http://www.kplu.org/post/how-scorpions-sting-led-seattle-scientists-brink-discovery <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Deathstalker</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> scorpion is about the size of your palm. It’s yellow and surly, its venom a seething cocktail of </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">neurotoxins</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span></p> Tue, 17 Dec 2013 13:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11770 at http://www.kplu.org How A Scorpion's Sting Led Seattle Scientists To The Brink Of Discovery Treating the Cow to Save the Kid: Where Human and Animal Health Intersect http://www.kplu.org/post/treating-cow-save-kid-where-human-and-animal-health-intersect <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">People fighting hunger in the developing world have noticed a troubling mystery: malnourished children sometimes fail to get healthier even when given a lot of extra nutrients.</span></p><p>The key to helping them may be to focus not on the kids, but on their cows, according to a team led by a University of Washington professor.</p><p>The researchers from UW, Washington State University and CDC-Kenya just received a Gates Foundation grant to examine the values of a holistic approach—one that focuses on the intersection of human, animal and environmental health.</p><p> Wed, 11 Dec 2013 13:01:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11575 at http://www.kplu.org Treating the Cow to Save the Kid: Where Human and Animal Health Intersect Organic Milk More Nutritious than Regular Milk, WSU Study Finds http://www.kplu.org/post/organic-milk-more-nutritious-regular-milk-wsu-study-finds <p></p><p>Organic dairy products may have a major nutritional advantage over conventional milk, Washington researchers <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0082429">have found in a study</a> that could affect the ongoing debate about the health benefits of organics.</p><p>A Washington State University-led team studied about 400 samples of whole milk, both traditionally-produced and organic, and found a key difference in the balance of fatty acids. Organic milk seems to have a much higher proportion of omega-3s compared with omega-6s.</p><p> Mon, 09 Dec 2013 22:00:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11528 at http://www.kplu.org Organic Milk More Nutritious than Regular Milk, WSU Study Finds Research Groups Team Up to Fight Cancer with 'Ninja Warrior T-Cells' http://www.kplu.org/post/research-groups-team-fight-cancer-ninja-warrior-t-cells <p></p><p>Seattle researchers and investors are making a massive bet on a new cancer-fighting technology.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The new startup, called Juno Therapeutics, is working on ways to take T-cells out of a patient’s body and genetically engineer them to attack his or her specific tumor.</span></p><p> Wed, 04 Dec 2013 22:07:56 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11422 at http://www.kplu.org Research Groups Team Up to Fight Cancer with 'Ninja Warrior T-Cells' Martian Mystery: How Water Could Have Flowed on Chilly Mars http://www.kplu.org/post/martian-mystery-how-water-could-have-flowed-chilly-mars <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A University of Washington researcher may have </span><a href="http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo2000.html" style="line-height: 1.5;" target="_blank">helped solve a Martian mystery</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;by</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;explaining how the chilly surface of Mars could have once flowed with water.</span></p> Wed, 27 Nov 2013 23:10:42 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 11328 at http://www.kplu.org Martian Mystery: How Water Could Have Flowed on Chilly Mars