Frank Langfitt http://www.kplu.org en What A Ban On Taxi Apps In Shanghai Says About China's Economy http://www.kplu.org/post/what-ban-taxi-apps-shanghai-says-about-chinas-economy The Chinese mega-city of Shanghai has been cracking down on popular taxi-booking apps, banning their use during rush hour. The government says apps discriminate against older people and those who don't have smartphones.<p>But economists and some customers see the crackdown as a small, textbook case of something much bigger: the battle between the government and market forces in the world's second-largest economy.<p>The apps are designed to address a supply and demand problem. Shanghai has at least 50,000 cabs but nearly 24 million people, according to the government. Thu, 10 Apr 2014 20:21:47 +0000 Frank Langfitt 15901 at http://www.kplu.org What A Ban On Taxi Apps In Shanghai Says About China's Economy Who's Behind The Mass Stabbing In China? http://www.kplu.org/post/whos-behind-mass-stabbing-china The Chinese government has blamed the deadly stabbing attack in southwest China on Muslim separatists from the country's northwest, but it has yet to provide hard evidence for the claim.<p>Police said they have captured the final three suspects in a knife attack that killed 29 people and left more than a 140 injured in the city of Kunming on Saturday, according to the state-run New China News Service.<p>Police say they shot and killed four suspects and captured an injured female suspect at the Kunming Rail Station, the scene of the massacre. Mon, 03 Mar 2014 20:22:36 +0000 Frank Langfitt 14365 at http://www.kplu.org Who's Behind The Mass Stabbing In China? Hong Kong To Destroy Ivory Stockpile, But Will It Curb Demand In China? http://www.kplu.org/post/hong-kong-destroy-ivory-stockpile-will-it-curb-demand-china Lucy Skrine, 11, was walking through the bustling streets of Hong Kong a few months ago with fellow animal activists, holding signs in Chinese and English that read: "Say No to Ivory."<p>"There was one mainland Chinese that came around, and she said, 'Why can't we buy ivory?' " the sixth-grader recalled. Lucy explained that poachers had to kill the elephant to extract the tusks.<p>"When she learned this, she was like, 'What? Mon, 17 Feb 2014 19:25:45 +0000 Frank Langfitt 13723 at http://www.kplu.org Hong Kong To Destroy Ivory Stockpile, But Will It Curb Demand In China? Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style http://www.kplu.org/post/shanghai-warms-new-cuisine-chinese-food-american-style Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here.<p>Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. Wed, 12 Feb 2014 17:06:21 +0000 Frank Langfitt 13556 at http://www.kplu.org Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style In Fast-Changing China, Reality Can Overtake Fiction http://www.kplu.org/post/fast-changing-china-reality-can-overtake-fiction One of the challenges of writing about China is the country moves fast — sometimes faster than the publishing business. Take <em>Enigma of China</em>, the latest detective novel by Chinese-American author Qiu Xiaolong.<p>In one scene, Qiu's main character, Inspector Chen, sits in a Shanghai restaurant scanning a hotel where government agents are holding a corrupt official in secret detention.<p>Recently, Qiu took me on a tour of the book's real-life settings, including the site of that eatery.<p>"It's a restaurant with a red lantern, so it's lovely," recalls Qiu, returning to the spot. Mon, 06 Jan 2014 21:00:37 +0000 Frank Langfitt 12310 at http://www.kplu.org In Fast-Changing China, Reality Can Overtake Fiction In Violent Hospitals, China's Doctors Can Become Patients http://www.kplu.org/post/violent-hospitals-chinas-doctors-can-become-patients Several hundred doctors and nurses jammed the courtyard of the No. 1 People's Hospital in Wenling, a city with a population of about 1 million in Zhejiang province, a four-hour train ride south of Shanghai.<p>They wore surgical masks to hide their identities from the government and waved white signs that read, "Zero tolerance for violence."<p>"Doctors and nurses must be safe to take care of people's health!" video shows them chanting.<p>The medical workers were reacting to a triple stabbing at the hospital three days earlier. Wed, 06 Nov 2013 17:08:18 +0000 Frank Langfitt 10866 at http://www.kplu.org In Violent Hospitals, China's Doctors Can Become Patients Someone In Central China Really Stinks At Photoshop http://www.kplu.org/post/someone-central-china-really-stinks-photoshop Local Chinese government propagandists have outdone themselves in what seems to be the increasingly competitive category of bad Photoshop.<p>This week's entry hails from Ningguo County in central China's Anhui province. The workmanship is so bad, it seems almost, well, effortless.<p>The photo, which <a href="http://beijingcream.com/2013/10/today-in-horrible-photoshops-officials-visiting-woman/">was posted</a> to the county's civil affairs website, purports to portray government officials visiting a 100-year-old woman. Wed, 30 Oct 2013 16:43:48 +0000 Frank Langfitt 10718 at http://www.kplu.org Someone In Central China Really Stinks At Photoshop