Jazz Northwest
11:37 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Bass players rule on Jazz NW!

 It's not often the bass player steps from the back of the band to front his own group but there are notable exceptions.... Charles Mingus, Ray Brown, and Ron Carter among others come to mind.  There are three with strong Seattle connections on Jazz Northwest this Sunday: Chuck Deardorf, the late Chuck Metcalf and Clipper Anderson.   We'll also hear an outstanding young alto saxophonist from Portland, Hailey Niswanger who recently graduated from Berklee College of Music in Boston. She's playing two gigs in the area next week.

NPR food
8:04 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

Chewing Chia Packs A Superfood Punch

The chia plant is "a petite nutrient-packed powerhouse" writes Wayne Coates. There is evidence that the Aztecs used the seeds as early as 3,500 B.C.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 3:10 pm

When you hear the word chia, you probably think of chia pets. Maybe you even mutter that catchy slogan: "ch-ch-ch-chia."

Or maybe not, but lately, chia seed has been getting buzz beyond those terra cotta figurines. It's becoming a popular health food. Rich in fiber, protein and the highest plant source of Omega 3s, the little seeds pack a major nutritional punch.

Wayne Coates grows and sells chia seeds and has a book called Chia: The Complete Guide to the Ultimate Superfood.

Read more
Artscape
5:03 am
Sun July 15, 2012

John Cage: a great of the musical avant-garde, with Seattle roots

The prepared piano in the lobby of the Cologne Philharmonic - an installation honoring John Cage's centennial as part of the Acht Bruecken festival of new music. Cage invented the prepared piano while in Seattle.
Photo by Bellamy Pailthorp KPLU News

Many experts call him the greatest iconoclast of 20th-century music.

The avant-garde composer John Cage is perhaps best known for his pioneering use of silence in music. He also broke ground with the use of everyday objects as instruments, electronics and chance in composition.

He was born in California and died in New York. But some of his most formative years took place in Seattle.

Read more
Education
5:10 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

Publicity turns up the heat on Tacoma schools' sunscreen ban

Zoe and Violet came home from a field trip badly burned. Both sunscreen and hats were prohibited by school policy.
Jesse Michener

A couple of bad sunburns have left Tacoma’s school district smarting, and could help spur policy changes about students and sunscreen. Tacoma school officials say they’ll revisit a policy banning the use of sunscreen by students, except with a doctor’s note.

The district is getting national attention after a Tacoma mom’s story went viral in late June. Jesse Michener says it never occurred to her to jump through the hoops it would take to get her daughters sunscreen when they left for a field trip on a rainy morning, but they came home burned badly enough that Michener took them to the hospital.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
1:02 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

Electric Fans May Do More Harm Than Good In A Heat Wave

Researchers say that when temperatures rise above 95 degrees, a fan might make you even hotter, and maybe even sick.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 9:26 am

Assuming you can't spend a heat wave bobbing up and down in some cool body of water, the next best option is to hunker down inside with air blowing on you, right?

Preferably it's from an air conditioner set on arctic chill.

But if there's no AC, then an electric fan would be the next best thing, wouldn't you think?

Well, it turns out health experts aren't so sure about electric fans. And they say using one in a really brutal heat wave can sometimes do more harm than good.

Read more
Weather with Cliff Mass
9:09 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Summer thunderstorms will continue, says Cliff Mass

Lightning over Puget Sound on Thursday night, as seen from the northern Kitsap town of Hansville.
Greg Johnson www.skunkbayweather.com

If you were in the mountains or northern Puget Sound last night, you may have seen some spectacular lightning bolts and thunderstorms. Those are rare in the northwest, compared with the midwest. But KPLU weather expert Cliff Mass says the right conditions are here now, and will be with us through Saturday.

Mass, a professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Washington, explains why, in this week's interview.

Read more
Business
8:43 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Cities near Seattle may lose tax revenue if arena gets built

The Sonics playing the Pistons at KeyArena in 2007
Mike Kelley

A new professional basketball and hockey arena in Seattle could steal tax dollars from neighboring communities. That’s according to the analysis of University of Washington geography professor Bill Beyers, who has spent a lot of time studying the economic impact of professional sports.

Beyers has done previous analyses about the Mariners and Seahawks, as well as KeyArena.  As part of an expert panel, Beyers presented his initial thoughts on the proposed NBA and NHL arena to the King County Council.

Read more
I Wonder Why ... ?
4:05 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Why is "Louie Louie" Washington's theme song?

In the 1980’s, the Washington State Legislature considered making it the official state song. The measure failed, but “Louie Louie” is still listed on government websites as the “unofficial” state rock song.

Sure it’s got a good beat and it’s easy to dance to, but is a song about a Jamaican sailor longing for his girl really the best tune to represent Washington State?

How did this classic party song become so much a part of our cultural DNA, anyway?

Read More on "I Wonder Why ... ?"

Sports with Art Thiel
1:15 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Why should Seattle dance with Stern, NBA again?

N.B.A. Commissioner David Stern, pictured here in Houston, in February, 2012.
David J. Phillip AP Images

If the backers of a plan to build a new sports arena in Seattle's SoDo area are successful, they'll be looking to attract both a professional hockey club and a professional basketball team as marquis tenants.

Seattle and King County lawmakers are poring over the proposal's details. In the coming weeks they'll cast votes on the arena plan, its call for up to $200 million in public bonds (to be paired with $300 million in private funds), a plan championed by investor Chris Hansen.

Read more
Business
4:10 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Boeing wins big 737MAX order from United

Boeing had a triumphant announcement today - a big order from United Continental for its 737 narrow-body airplanes, which are made in Renton. United is buying 150 737s, Boeing's popular single-aisle jet. Two-thirds of those planes will be the newest version – the 737MAX, which Boeing announced last August.

Boeing was rushing to catch up with its rival Airbus, which had already announced hundreds of orders for its new narrow-body plane, the A320neo. Randy Tinseth is a vice president of marketing for Boeing.

Read more
biotech and life sciences
12:41 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Health technology has jobs, but walks on shifting sands

The Seattle area biotech and medical device industry is not likely to produce any companies as big as Microsoft or Amazon. But smaller companies, with strange names, keep popping up—like Etubics, Numera, Obenomics, and NanoString.

And, apparently, this sector is adding jobs.

That’s the word at the annual Life Science Innovation Northwest conference, in Seattle this week.

Read more
Summer Movies
11:15 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Ten outdoor venues for a summer flick

Participants wait for the sun to set at Redhook Brewery's Summer Moonlight Cinema.
Redhook Brewery

Summer in Seattle has arrived and venues around the Puget Sound are complementing the weather. Grab some chairs, blankets, snacks, family and friends to hit the nearest starlit theater near you.

Most venues are family-friendly, but the Redhook Brewery's Summer Cinema and Fremont's Outdoor Cinema host a few 21 and older showings for their R-rated flicks. Some events are free while others require donations or admission payments. All shows start at dusk.

Take a look at ten featured venues around the Puget Sound:

Read more
Synthetic Drugs
9:07 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Fake Pot Is A Real Problem For Regulators

A screengrab from the Mr. Nice Guy site shows the company's products, including Relaxinol, which was blamed for contributing to an accidental death.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 10:09 am

This week, President Obama signed a law banning synthetic marijuana and other synthetic drugs. Dozens of states and local governments have already tried to outlaw fake marijuana, which has been blamed for hundreds of emergency room visits and a handful of fatalities.

But the bans have proved largely ineffective, and there are fears that the federal law won't be any different.

Synthetic marijuana looks a bit like dried grass clippings. It's readily available on the Internet and in convenience stores and smoke shops, where it's sold as herbal incense or potpourri.

Read more
Health
8:26 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Nightly glass of wine may protect boomer women's bones

Cheers! Moderate drinking might slow age-related bone loss in women.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 7:00 am

It's well-known that exercise is good for our bones, even as we age, but how about that nightly glass of wine?

A new study of women in their 50s and early 60s finds that moderate alcohol consumption may help prevent bone loss. The women in the study consumed about 1 1/2 drinks per day.

Read more
Record Bin Roulette
4:30 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Tour de France Inspires Pop Music Gold

The Tour de France is the world’s epic bicycle race, a grueling 2,000 mile ride that takes 3 weeks.  It’s arguably the most demanding athletic event, said the New York Times, comparing it to running a marathon several days a week for three weeks. With the 99th Tour underway right now, we salute the humble velocipede and their sore-bottomed riders.

Read more

Pages