Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has pardoned thousands of inmates to make room in the country's overcrowded, cash-strapped prisons.

The move is "set to decongest national prisons and promote better living conditions," the state-run Herald reports. But as Reuters notes, this also comes as "prisons struggle to feed inmates due to lack of funding from the government."

News that a subsidiary of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield will stop selling bronze-level health plans on the Virginia marketplace next year prompted speculation that it could signal a movement by insurers to drop that coverage level altogether.

The reality may be more complicated and interesting, some analysts said, based on a look at plan data.

Forty-one employees of the Secret Service have been disciplined for improperly accessing data about Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the secretary of Homeland Security said Thursday.

Secretary Jeh Johnson says the employee responsible for leaking that private information to the press has already resigned from the Secret Service.

The incident in question happened last year — one of a series of scandals that embarrassed the Secret Service, the agency charged with protecting the president, among other duties.

As we reported at the time:

Parker Miles Blohm / KPLU

Two-time Grammy nominee Jane Monheit returned to our studios for another exclusive session this spring, hot on the heels of her latest album, a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald's legendary recordings of the Great American Songbook.

Monheit is no stranger to these timeless standards, as she reminds us with gorgeous, intimate performances of classics by Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, and the Gershwins - with her longtime musical partner Michael Kanan her only accompaniment at the piano.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The Mariners host the Twins this weekend at Safeco Field. After two big wins this week and a highly successful road trip, the team has one of the best records in Major League Baseball.

KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel talks about why the team and its fans are in some unfamiliar territory.

She sails by the memory of the stars.

Her bones are lashed together with 6 miles of rope. Her twin wooden masts are lowered and outstretched only by the power of muscled arms. And once fully extended, the red, V-shaped sails announce who she is.

She is the Hokule'a, Hawaii's famous voyaging canoe, built in the double-hulled style used by Polynesian navigators thousands of years ago to cross the Pacific.

As the U.S. Army Air Corps prepared to unleash the world's first attack by an atomic bomb on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, Japanese schoolgirl Kikue Takagi, age 12, woke up feeling sick and stayed home that day.

Her classmates were sent to Hiroshima's city center to clean up debris, doing their part in the war effort as Japan struggled to hold off the rapidly approaching U.S. military. Those students were near ground zero when the American bomb obliterated the city.

At home on the outskirts of Hiroshima, Takagi was spared.

It has been five years since NASA retired the space shuttle, ending a federal program that employed some 10,000 people around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The loss of those jobs was a blow to Florida's Space Coast, an area closely identified with NASA and the nation's space program. But the region's economy is bouncing back and attracting companies that are in a new space race.

If you've been following the Democratic presidential contest, you might be wondering how it is possible that Bernie Sanders seems to have all the energy and enthusiasm and, yet, Hillary Clinton is way ahead in the race to the nomination.

A listener named Gerard Allen wrote into the NPR Politics Podcast with an observation:

"Seventy-one years ago, on a bright, cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed," President Obama said Friday, in the first visit by a sitting U.S. president to Hiroshima, Japan.

In 1945, the United States dropped the first atomic bomb used in warfare on that city, killing an estimated 140,000 people. A second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki three days later. Within weeks, Japan surrendered, ending the war in the Pacific Theater.

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