Ashley Gross / KPLU

Seattle Council Elections, District 6: Pace Of Development Troubles Ballard Residents

If you think Seattle’s already struggling with growth, imagine adding another 120,000 people. That’s the jump in population the city expects over the next two decades. But where do you put those folks? People in neighborhoods such as Ballard say there’s already too much construction.
Read More

Saturdays beginning at 10 a.m.

Kyle Stokes / KPLU News

Mary Ann Fordyce didn't think there was anything she could do about the proposed development that will cast a shadow over the garden in her backyard.

After her neighbor died, a developer paid $755,000 for the modest house and a 5,000-square-foot lot on the other side of Fordyce's fence and drew up plans to replace with five townhomes.

Then another neighbor, Catherine Smith, came to her door — she lived just across from the lot in question on North 46th St. in Seattle's Wallingford neighborhood — with an idea on how to fight the proposal.

Austin Jenkins

Washington state regulators are tightening their grip on medical marijuana this week by targeting dubious patient authorizations. But some clinics say the changes, which begin Friday, will put them out of business.

The new Cannabis Patient Protection Act requires any health care provider who authorizes more than 30 medical cannabis patients in a month to report to the Department of Health.

One third of homeless people in King County live out of their cars.  People with large vehicles like RVs and even buses tend to cluster in industrial areas -- until they’re asked to move on. 

Jennifer Smith lives in her RV with her 15-month-old daughter, Willow. “Its basically got a bus back end and a truck front end,” Smith said.

Her vehicle has been parked in this spot in the Wallingford neighborhood of Seattle for three weeks, but she’s lived in the area along North Northlake Way since April. She was ticketed once and received several warnings. Legally a car can’t be parked in the same spot for more than 72 hours in Seattle.

But neighbors say some 15 RV’s have been parked along this stretch of Lake Union and they don’t seem to budge. Until a recent notice.

NASA / Flickr

Boeing says it’s confident the company will still be able to deliver 18 tanker aircraft to the U.S. Air Force two years from now in spite of problems that emerged in the most recent quarter. 

The KC-46 tanker program was the focus of a big fight between Boeing and Airbus for years before the contract finally went to Boeing. Now, the first tankers are being built in Everett.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

Microsoft shares slumped more than 3 percent after the company reported a net loss of $3.2 billion in the most recent quarter as it wrote down much of the value of its Nokia acquisition.

Total revenue fell 5 percent in the June quarter, with a 13 percent drop in Microsoft's Devices and Consumer division, which included a steep drop in revenue from Windows due to declining personal computer sales. Revenue in the commercial side of the business was little changed from a year earlier.

AP Images

It's been nearly a year since a train derailed under a busy Seattle bridge, tipping three oil tanker cars off the tracks in Magnolia during the morning commute. No one was hurt in the accident but the near-miss spurred city officials into action.  

A new resolution is going before the city council that outlines Seattle's wish list for regulations of crude oil shipments by rail. 

Jennifer Wing


When you drive over the South Park Bridge you leave Georgetown and Boeing Field behind. You cross a super fund site, the Duwamish River. A picturesque marina filled with sailboats is off to the left.

Nancy Leson

"So Stein," Nancy asks me.  "Do you say APP-ricot or AYP-ricot?"  Sure, I know that an AYP-ricot is where an ape sleeps but as a certified fruit-o-phobic I prefer not to say either.  Even typing out the word "apricot" makes me a little queasy, but in the interest of Art I'll tough it out.

Nancy's apricot tree, an under-performer for decades, finally came across.  This week's Food for Thought covers some of the stuff that she, her son Nate, and her dog (video follows) did with all that fruit.

Ashley Gross / KPLU

To live in the Northwest is, to some extent, to roll the dice. If you lived through the 1965 Seattle earthquake, or the Nisqually in 2001, or if you just read the New Yorker article about the “really big one” destined to hit our region, you know this well: There are forces under our feet that could just shrug our cities off into the abyss.

The push and pull of continental plates is so huge compared with a puny little human. And yet, for a man named Kelcy Allen, the act of a child shielded him from the seismic forces. He’s spent decades feeling grateful to the boy who died saving his life.

Bellamy Pailthorp / KPLU

The promise of light rail goes far beyond people’s hopes for swift passage between Seattle neighborhoods and the airport; It’s also supposed to deliver money in the form of commerce to business owners it rolls past.

But that’s not really panning out yet for many residents of Seattle’s District 2.

Pages