Business
5:00 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Seattle Business Owners Turn To An Unlikely Source Of Consultants: UW Undergrads

Kristi Brown Wokoma, a Seattle chef, makes a unique kind of hummus out of black-eyed peas. She's turned to UW undergraduates for consulting help.
Ashley Gross KPLU

Business owners in Seattle and around the state are lining up to tap the expertise of an unusual group of consultants: undergraduates at the University of Washington. That may sound surprising, since the students mostly just have a few internships on their resumes.

But their consulting class pushes them to dive deep into their clients’ business problems and deliver tangible, practical advice.

For one local chef, it’s a partnership that has yielded results.

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Health Insurance
5:00 am
Mon April 21, 2014

New State Rules Could Limit Cheaper Health Plans With 'Narrow Networks'

Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidelr (File image)
Ted S. Warren Associated Press

The practice of offering relatively inexpensive health plans with bare-bones provider networks has created tension between making health care affordable and keeping it accessible. It’s set to come to a head this week in Olympia.

The growth of “narrow networks” in Washington comes as the Affordable Care Act limits the ability of insurance companies to control their costs. That’s made it harder to offer plans at a range of prices — something the companies want to do as they compete for comparison shoppers on the health exchanges.

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On Resilience
4:59 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Washington's Own Bill Iffrig A Reluctant Hero Of Boston Marathon Bombing

Bill Iffrig
Jessica Robinson

An elderly man from Lake Stevens has become a reluctant symbol of resilience in the face of terrorism. 

An image of 79-year-old Bill Iffrig, blown off his feet in an orange singlet near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, went around the world. He was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated, and interviewed for a 12-minute online documentary titled "The Finish Line." 

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Liquor Law
4:30 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Stores With High Shoplifting Rate Could Lose Liquor License Under New State Law

Steve Helber AP Photo

Grocery store owners who are losing liquor to shoplifters could pay a hefty price. Under a new law that takes effect June 13, the state can take away the store's license to sell liquor.

The crack down is aimed at keeping liquor out of the hands of underage drinkers.

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Jazz Appreciation Month
3:38 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Song Of The Day: Lionel Hampton's 'I Got A Heartful Of Music'

smithsonianjazz.org

Lionel Hampton is a towering figure in the world of jazz. He was one of the first people to play the vibraphone and make that instrument popular, he played in one of the first racially integrated bands in the world, and the list of people he played and recorded with reads like a who's who of jazz: Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Charles Mingus, Dizzy Gillespie, Wes Montgomery, Art Tatum, Stan Getz and on and on. It's also his birthday today, so I thought we'd fire up some of his best.

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Jazz Northwest
1:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Kendra Shank And John Stowell Performing At SAM

Kendra Shank and John Stowell in concert at Seattle Art Museum.
Jim Levitt

Former Seattle resident Kendra Shank now lives in New York, and John Stowell resides in Portland when he's not touring. They first performed together in Portland over twenty years ago but when they re-discovered how much they liked making music together, it resulted in a new CD "New York Conversations."

The duo is currently on a West Coast tour with 13 dates which began in Seattle with a concert at The Seattle Art Museum.

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Religion
12:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

This May Be Rogue Parishioners' Last Easter In Closed Church

Since 2004, members of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church have continuously occupied the building to keep it from shutting down.
Maryellen Rogers

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 8:53 am

Nearly a decade has passed since the doors of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church were shut and its holy water dried up.

With the Archdiocese of Boston strapped for cash, it was one of dozens of churches in the area to be closed and sold off. At the time, the archdiocese was in the throes of the clergy sex abuse crisis. It had agreed to pay nearly $85 million to more than 500 people who said they were abused by priests.

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Jazz Appreciation Month
1:26 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Song Of The Day: Vijay Iyer's 'Galang,' Trio Riot Version

smithsonianjazz.org

Pianist Vijay Iyer is one of the most celebrated and talked-about musicians of his generation. His list of accomplishments and accolades is impressive, including Grammy Nominations, Jazz Musician of the Year awards, and even a MacArthur Genius Award. His body of work is as broad as it is creative, and he's a powerful piano player and a skillful composer. He was recently added to the music faculty at Harvard, so he must be a pretty good teacher, too!

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Salmon vs. Sea Lions
11:49 am
Sat April 19, 2014

First Nuisance Sea Lions Of 2014 Killed At Bonneville Dam

This file photo shows a California sea lion consuming a salmon just below the Columbia River's Bonneville Dam.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

 

State wildlife officers trapped and killed six salmon-chomping sea lions at Bonneville Dam earlier this week.

It's part of a renewed campaign against nuisance predators who follow the spring salmon run.

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Shots - Health News
10:14 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Mental And Physical Toll Of Bullying Persists For Decades

The longitudinal British study checked in with 8,000 families across 40 years to trace the trajectory of a bullied child.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 3:56 pm

What doesn't kill us only makes us stronger, right? Well, not when it comes to bullying.

Some may still consider bullying a harmless part of growing up, but mounting evidence suggests that the adverse effects of being bullied aren't something kids can just shake off. The psychological and physical tolls, like anxiety and depression, can follow a person into early adulthood.

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:13 am
Sat April 19, 2014

So This Is How They Do It! Zebras Getting Stripes

Ricardo Solis

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:42 am

How did it happen? How'd the zebra get its stripes?

In Rudyard Kipling's version, a gray, horsey-looking beast went into "a great forest 'sclusively full of trees and bushes and stripy, speckly, patchy-batchy shadows," stayed there awhile, and after a "long time"... got stripy.

OK. Not bad.

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Jazz Appreciation Month
9:42 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Song Of The Day: Sonny Rollins' 'Without A Song'

smithsonianjazz.org

“I want to be connecting with the subconscious, if I can call it that, because there are not to many words to describe the real deep inner part of a human being…I want to be at that place where everything is blotted out and where creativity happens, and to get there I practice, you know I’m a prolific practicer, I still practice every day…You have to have the skills, then you want to not think when you’re playing, that’s when you let whatever deep level of creativity, spirituality, I mean, you know these words are so inadequate these days but you want to get to this place where they exi

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Controversial Book
7:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Campaign To Get Sherman Alexie Book To Idaho Students Tops Goal

File photo of "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian."
Kraemer Family Library Flickr

Two women in Washington have raised enough money to send 350 copies of a controversial book by Sherman Alexie to students in Meridian, Idaho. 

The move is in reaction to the Meridian School Board's decision to suspend use of “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" after parents complained about profanity and sexual content in the novel.

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The Salt
6:58 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Like Ham? There's A Festival For That In French Basque Country

Visitors look at Bayonne hams displayed on the first day of the yearly ham fair.
Gaizka Iroz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:52 pm

In Bayonne, they take their ham very, very seriously.

This medieval fortress of a town is minutes from the French seaside ports of Barritz and St. Jean de Luz, and not far from Spain's St. Sebastian. It has reigned as a cultural and commercial center for a millennium, according to historian Mark Kurlansky in The Basque History of the World.

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Shots - Health News
10:48 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Why Mumps And Measles Can Spread Even When We're Vaccinated

Potent but not perfect: Medical assistant Elissa Ortivez prepares a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at a clinic in Walsenburg, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 10:25 am

More than two months ago, a nasty mumps virus triggered fever, headache and painfully swollen glands among a handful of students at Ohio State University. Now the outbreak has ballooned to 234 cases at last count, and has spilled into the surrounding community in Columbus, Ohio.

"Columbus officials are calling it the city's biggest outbreak since the development of the mumps vaccine in the 1940s," WOSU reporter Steve Brown tells Shots. "It even pushed them to open a new clinic."

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